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Since de-referencing nullptr (NULL) is an undefined behavior both in C and C++, I am wondering if expression &(*ptr) is a valid one if ptr is nullptr (NULL).

If it is also an undefined behavior, how does OFFSETOF macro in the linked answer work?

I always thought that ptr->field is a shorthand for (*ptr).field

I think the answer to my question is similar in C and C++.

marked as duplicate by Raymond Chen, πάντα ῥεῖ c++ Jul 27 '16 at 14:38

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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    C11 draft standard n1570: 6.5.3.2 Address and indirection operators 3 The unary & operator yields the address of its operand. If the operand has type ‘‘type’’, the result has type ‘‘pointer to type’’. If the operand is the result of a unary * operator, neither that operator nor the & operator is evaluated and the result is as if both were omitted, except that the constraints on the operators still apply and the result is not an lvalue. – EOF Jul 27 '16 at 14:13
  • I marked this as a duplicate, but be sure to read the discussion under the C++ answer, as well as this discussion, as this is not quite so explicit in the C++ standard. – TartanLlama Jul 27 '16 at 14:17
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    I doubt this is duplicate as OP asks "if dereferencing nullptr is UB how offesetof works" – Slava Jul 27 '16 at 14:22
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    @TartanLlama Since I can't find an equivalent exemption for using &*NULL in c++, I suspect this may be one of the points where the two languages diverge. The supposed duplicate can only stand if the c-tag is removed. – EOF Jul 27 '16 at 14:26
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    The identified duplicate does not answer this question. – Peter Jul 27 '16 at 14:58
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TL;DR &(*(char*)0) is well defined.

The C++ standard doesn't say that indirection of null pointer by itself has UB. Current standard draft, [expr.unary.op]

  1. The unary * operator performs indirection: the expression to which it is applied shall be a pointer to an object type, or a pointer to a function type and the result is an lvalue referring to the object or function to which the expression points. If the type of the expression is “pointer to T”, the type of the result is “T”. [snip]

  2. The result of the unary & operator is a pointer to its operand. The operand shall be an lvalue or a qualified-id. [snip]

There is no UB unless the lvalue of the indirection expression is converted to an rvalue.


The C standard is much more explicit. C11 standard draft §6.5.3.2

  1. The unary & operator yields the address of its operand. If the operand has type "type", the result has type "pointer to type". If the operand is the result of a unary * operator, neither that operator nor the & operator is evaluated and the result is as if both were omitted, except that the constraints on the operators still apply and the result is not an lvalue. Similarly, if the operand is the result of a [] operator, neither the & operator nor the unary * that is implied by the [] is evaluated and the result is as if the & operator were removed and the [] operator were changed to a + operator. Otherwise, the result is a pointer to the object or function designated by its operand.
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If it is also an undefined behavior, how does offsetof work?

Prefer using the standard offsetof macro. Home-grown versions result in compiler warnings. Moreover:

offsetof is required to work as specified above, even if unary operator& is overloaded for any of the types involved. This cannot be implemented in standard C++ and requires compiler support.

offsetof is a built-in function in gcc.

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    OP is referring to the macro from the link: #define OFFSETOF(type, field) ((unsigned long) &(((type *) 0)->field)) – Franko Leon Tokalić Jul 27 '16 at 14:38
  • @Byteventurer No reason to use a home-grown offsetoff, it results in compiler warnings. Use the standard offsetof. – Maxim Egorushkin Jul 27 '16 at 14:40
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    I am not propagating the use of the macro, I am explaining what the OP is referring to when asking the question... – Franko Leon Tokalić Jul 27 '16 at 14:41
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    Perhaps he is. Still, the question was about &(*p) where p is a null pointer, not about offsetof itself, and the offsetof macro he linked to did just that. Before the edit, you missed the point of the question IMO. – Franko Leon Tokalić Jul 27 '16 at 14:48
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    @MaximEgorushkin, I am aware that offsetof and OFFSETOF are different. Nevertheless, the question was not about which one to use. OFFSETOF was just a simple example with 64 upvotes and marked as an accepted answer. I can give another example if that would be more convenient ;-) – TruLa Jul 27 '16 at 14:58

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