The implicit conversion of a Python sequence of variable-length lists into a NumPy array cause the array to be of type object.

v = [[1], [1, 2]]
np.array(v)
>>> array([[1], [1, 2]], dtype=object)

Trying to force another type will cause an exception:

np.array(v, dtype=np.int32)
ValueError: setting an array element with a sequence.

What is the most efficient way to get a dense NumPy array of type int32, by filling the "missing" values with a given placeholder?

From my sample sequence v, I would like to get something like this, if 0 is the placeholder

array([[1, 0], [1, 2]], dtype=int32)
up vote 13 down vote accepted

You can use itertools.zip_longest:

import itertools
np.array(list(itertools.zip_longest(*v, fillvalue=0))).T
Out: 
array([[1, 0],
       [1, 2]])

Note: For Python 2, it is itertools.izip_longest.

  • 3
    This seems really good when the the size variation is huge within the list elements based on a quick runtime test for a large dataset. – Divakar Jul 27 '16 at 17:36

Here's an almost* vectorized boolean-indexing based approach that I have used in several other posts -

def boolean_indexing(v):
    lens = np.array([len(item) for item in v])
    mask = lens[:,None] > np.arange(lens.max())
    out = np.zeros(mask.shape,dtype=int)
    out[mask] = np.concatenate(v)
    return out

Sample run

In [27]: v
Out[27]: [[1], [1, 2], [3, 6, 7, 8, 9], [4]]

In [28]: out
Out[28]: 
array([[1, 0, 0, 0, 0],
       [1, 2, 0, 0, 0],
       [3, 6, 7, 8, 9],
       [4, 0, 0, 0, 0]])

*Please note that this coined as almost vectorized because the only looping performed here is at the start, where we are getting the lengths of the list elements. But that part not being so computationally demanding should have minimal effect on the total runtime.

Runtime test

In this section I am timing DataFrame-based solution by @Alberto Garcia-Raboso, itertools-based solution by @ayhan as they seem to scale well and the boolean-indexing based one from this post for a relatively larger dataset with three levels of size variation across the list elements.

Case #1 : Larger size variation

In [44]: v = [[1], [1,2,4,8,4],[6,7,3,6,7,8,9,3,6,4,8,3,2,4,5,6,6,8,7,9,3,6,4]]

In [45]: v = v*1000

In [46]: %timeit pd.DataFrame(v).fillna(0).values.astype(np.int32)
100 loops, best of 3: 9.82 ms per loop

In [47]: %timeit np.array(list(itertools.izip_longest(*v, fillvalue=0))).T
100 loops, best of 3: 5.11 ms per loop

In [48]: %timeit boolean_indexing(v)
100 loops, best of 3: 6.88 ms per loop

Case #2 : Lesser size variation

In [49]: v = [[1], [1,2,4,8,4],[6,7,3,6,7,8]]

In [50]: v = v*1000

In [51]: %timeit pd.DataFrame(v).fillna(0).values.astype(np.int32)
100 loops, best of 3: 3.12 ms per loop

In [52]: %timeit np.array(list(itertools.izip_longest(*v, fillvalue=0))).T
1000 loops, best of 3: 1.55 ms per loop

In [53]: %timeit boolean_indexing(v)
100 loops, best of 3: 5 ms per loop

Case #3 : Larger number of elements (100 max) per list element

In [139]: # Setup inputs
     ...: N = 10000 # Number of elems in list
     ...: maxn = 100 # Max. size of a list element
     ...: lens = np.random.randint(0,maxn,(N))
     ...: v = [list(np.random.randint(0,9,(L))) for L in lens]
     ...: 

In [140]: %timeit pd.DataFrame(v).fillna(0).values.astype(np.int32)
1 loops, best of 3: 292 ms per loop

In [141]: %timeit np.array(list(itertools.izip_longest(*v, fillvalue=0))).T
1 loops, best of 3: 264 ms per loop

In [142]: %timeit boolean_indexing(v)
10 loops, best of 3: 95.7 ms per loop

To me, it seems itertools.izip_longest is doing pretty well! there's no clear winner, but would have to be taken on a case-by-case basis!

  • Your method seems faster in my tests :) i.imgur.com/W8Q2zF8.png – user2285236 Jul 27 '16 at 18:01
  • @ayhan Hmm can't run that on my Python 2 version. Could it be my NumPy version 1.11.1? – Divakar Jul 27 '16 at 18:06
  • 2
    I guess all methods are iterating over v but as the lists inside v are getting larger, your method starts to be faster. I tried it with n=10^3, m=10^4 and it was 5 times faster. I have 1.11.1 in Python 3 but results are very similar to Python 2.7 numpy 1.10.4 – user2285236 Jul 27 '16 at 18:13
  • 1
    @ayhan Appreciate the feedback and honesty! ;) Added another case for that :) – Divakar Jul 27 '16 at 18:34

Pandas and its DataFrame-s deal beautifully with missing data.

import numpy as np
import pandas as pd

v = [[1], [1, 2]]
print(pd.DataFrame(v).fillna(0).values.astype(np.int32))

# array([[1, 0],
#        [1, 2]], dtype=int32)
  • 2
    This is great for data with less size variation, good solution really! – Divakar Jul 27 '16 at 17:38
max_len = max(len(sub_list) for sub_list in v)

result = np.array([sub_list + [0] * (max_len - len(sub_list)) for sub_list in v])

>>> result
array([[1, 0],
       [1, 2]])

>>> type(result)
numpy.ndarray

Here is a general way:

>>> v = [[1], [2, 3, 4], [5, 6], [7, 8, 9, 10], [11, 12]]
>>> max_len = np.argmax(v)
>>> np.hstack(np.insert(v, range(1, len(v)+1),[[0]*(max_len-len(i)) for i in v])).astype('int32').reshape(len(v), max_len)
array([[ 1,  0,  0,  0],
       [ 2,  3,  4,  0],
       [ 5,  6,  0,  0],
       [ 7,  8,  9, 10],
       [11, 12,  0,  0]], dtype=int32)

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