16

I have a model (fit), based on historic information until last month. Now I would like to predict using my model for the current month. When I try to invoke the following code:

predicted <- predict(fit, testData[-$Readmit])

I get the following error:

Error in UseMethod("predict") : no applicable method for 'predict'
    applied to an object of class "train"

Notes:

  1. The fit model was created via: train function from caret package, using random forest algorithm
  2. The predict is a generic function that will invoke the specific predict function based on the first input argument. In my case it will be:

    >fit$modelInfo$label

    [1] "Random Forest"

Therefore the predict method invoked will be: predict.randomForest. See [caret documentation][3] for more info.

Here the summary source code for generating the model and invoking it:

# Script-1: create a model:
fit <- train(testData[-$Readmit], testData$Readmit)
saveRDS(fit, modelFileName) # save the fit object into a file

# Script-2: predict
fit <- readRDS(modelFileName) # Load the model (generated previously)
predicted <- predict(fit, testData[-$Readmit])

Note: The execution time for generating the model is about 3 hours, that is why I save the object for reusing after that.

The data set from the training model as the following structure:

> str(fit$trainingData)
'data.frame':   29955 obs. of  27 variables:
$ Acuity                : Factor w/ 3 levels "Elective  ","Emergency ",..: 2 2 2 1 1 2 2 2 1 1 ...
$ AgeGroup              : Factor w/ 10 levels "100-105","65-70",..: 8 6 9 9 5 4 9 2 3 2 ...
$ IsPriority            : int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
$ QNXTReferToId         : int  115 1703712 115 3690 1948 115 109 512 481 1785596 ...
$ QNXTReferFromId       : int  1740397 1724801 1711465 1704170 1714272 1731911 1535 1712758 1740614 1760252 ...
$ iscasemanagement      : Factor w/ 2 levels "N","Y": 2 1 1 2 2 1 2 1 2 2 ...
$ iseligible            : Factor w/ 2 levels "N","Y": 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 ...
$ referralservicecode   : Factor w/ 11 levels "12345","278",..: 1 1 1 9 9 1 1 6 9 9 ...
$ IsHighlight           : Factor w/ 2 levels "N","Y": 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
$ admittingdiagnosiscode: num  439 786 785 786 428 ...
$ dischargediagnosiscode: num  439 0 296 786 428 ...
$ RealLengthOfStay      : int  3 1 6 1 2 3 3 7 3 2 ...
$ QNXTPCPId             : int  1740397 1724801 1711465 1704170 1714272 1731911 1535 1712758 1740614 1760252 ...
$ QNXTProgramId         : Factor w/ 3 levels "QMXHPQ0839     ",..: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
$ physicalzipcode       : int  33054 33712 33010 33809 33010 33013 33142 33030 33161 33055 ...
$ gender                : Factor w/ 2 levels "F","M": 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 2 1 ...
$ ethnicitycode         : Factor w/ 4 levels "ETHN0001       ",..: 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 ...
$ dx1                   : num  439 786 296 786 428 ...
$ dx2                   : num  439 292 785 786 428 ...
$ dx3                   : num  402 0 250 0 0 ...
$ svc1                  : int  0 120 120 762 762 120 120 120 762 762 ...
$ svc2                  : int  120 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
$ svc3                  : int  0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ...
$ Disposition           : Factor w/ 28 levels "0","APPEAL & GRIEVANCE REVIEW                                   ",..: 11 11 16 11 11 11 11 11 11 11 ...
$ AvgIncome             : Factor w/ 10 levels "-1",">100k","0-25k",..: 3 6 3 8 3 4 3 5 4 4 ...
$ CaseManagerNameID     : int  124 1 1 19 20 1 16 1 43 20 ...
$ .outcome              : Factor w/ 2 levels "NO","YES": 1 2 2 1 1 1 2 2 1 1    ...

now the testData will have the following structure:

> str(testData[-$Readmit])
'data.frame':   610 obs. of  26 variables:
$ Acuity                : Factor w/ 4 levels "0","Elective  ",..: 3 2 4 2 2 2 4 3 3 3 ...
$ AgeGroup              : Factor w/ 9 levels "100-105","65-70",..: 4 3 5 4 2 9 4 2 4 6 ...
$ IsPriority            : int  0 0 0 0 0 0 1 1 1 1 ...
$ QNXTReferToId         : int  2140 482 1703785 1941 114 1714905 1703785 98 109 109 ...
$ QNXTReferFromId       : int  1791383 1729375 1718532 1746336 1718267 1718267 1718532 98 109 109 ...
$ iscasemanagement      : Factor w/ 2 levels "N","Y": 2 2 2 2 2 2 1 2 2 1 ...
$ iseligible            : Factor w/ 2 levels "N","Y": 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 ...
$ referralservicecode   : Factor w/ 7 levels "12345","IPMAT          ",..: 5 1 1 1 1 1 1 5 1 5 ...
$ IsHighlight           : Factor w/ 2 levels "N","Y": 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
$ admittingdiagnosiscode: num  11440 11317 11420 11317 1361 ...
$ dischargediagnosiscode: num  11440 11317 11420 11317 1361 ...
$ RealLengthOfStay      : int  1 2 4 3 1 1 16 1 1 3 ...
$ QNXTPCPId             : int  3212 1713678 1738430 1713671 1720569 1791640 1725962 1148 1703290 1705009 ...
$ QNXTProgramId         : Factor w/ 2 levels "QMXHPQ0839     ",..: 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
$ physicalzipcode       : int  34744 33175 33844 33178 33010 33010 33897 33126 33127 33125 ...
$ gender                : Factor w/ 2 levels "F","M": 2 1 2 1 2 2 2 1 1 2 ...
$ ethnicitycode         : Factor w/ 1 level "No Ethnicity   ": 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 ...
$ dx1                   : num  11440 11317 11420 11317 1361 ...
$ dx2                   : num  11440 11317 11420 11317 1361 ...
$ dx3                   : num  0 1465 0 11326 0 ...
$ svc1                  : int  52648 27447 50040 27447 55866 55866 51595 0 99221 300616 ...
$ svc2                  : int  76872 120 50391 120 120 38571 120 762 120 0 ...
$ svc3                  : int  762 0 120 0 0 51999 0 0 0 762 ...
$ Disposition           : Factor w/ 14 levels "0","DENIED- Not Medically Necessary                             ",..: 3 5 3 4 3 3 5 3 3 5 ...
$ AvgIncome             : Factor w/ 10 levels "-1",">100k","0-25k",..: 6 7 5 9 3 3 6 4 3 4 ...
$ CaseManagerNameID     : int  1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 7 ...

The variable structure is the same, just that some factor variables has different levels because some variable has new values. For example: Acuity in the model has 3-levels and in the testing data 4-levels.

I don't have from upfront a way to know all possible level for all variables.

Any advice, please...

Thanks in advance,

David

6
  • 1
    train is not an R function. You can read its documentation like ?library_you_got_it_from::train. They probably mention there whether it has a predict method.
    – Frank
    Commented Jul 27, 2016 at 21:41
  • 1
    Is this from the caret package?
    – liori
    Commented Jul 27, 2016 at 21:42
  • do summary(fit) gives you something logical?
    – abhiieor
    Commented Jul 28, 2016 at 5:00
  • I added more detail in the original post based on the previous comments by ( @loiri @Frank and @ abhiieor ). @ abhiieor the output of str(fit) provide to much information, I got from it the training data structure via: fit$trainingData. The only different from this and other examples I am using too, is that I am saving the variable, then loading it and the test set comes from a new file (it is not part of the train set), but with the same data structure (but not possible all same values or levels). I don't know if this is related with my problem. thanks.
    – David Leal
    Commented Jul 28, 2016 at 13:57
  • 1
    Only the first @name in a comment gets pinged, fyi.
    – Frank
    Commented Jul 28, 2016 at 14:10

3 Answers 3

15

I think I found why this happened...The predict is a generic function from: stats package. I use the namespace ::-notation for invoking the functions from the caret package (that is the recommendation for creating a user packages) and the equivalent predict function from caret package is: predict.train, that is an internal function, that cannot be invoked by an external application. The only way to invoke this function, is using the generic predict function from stats package, then based on the class of the first input argument: predicted <- predict(fit, testData[-$Readmit]) it identifies the particular predict function will be invoked.

For this particular case the class of this function is train, so it would call actually the function: train.predict from caret package. This function also handles the particular function requested for prediction based on the algorithm (method) used, for example: predict.gbm or predict.glm, etc. It is explained, in detail, in the caret documentation section: "5.7 Extracting Predictions and Class Probabilities".

Therefore the ::-notation works well for other functions in the package, such as: caret.train for example, but not for this particular one: predict. In such cases it is necessary to explicitly load the library, so it internally can invoke predict.train function.

In short, the solution is just adding the following line before invoking the predict function:

library(caret)

Then error disappears.

1
  • 1
    The same thing happened to me with the biglm package, after having attached caret but not biglm, so + 1.
    – YCR
    Commented Aug 17, 2017 at 12:38
8

Based on the answer from @David Leal, I tried loading library(caret) before calling the predict function but it did not help.

After trying a bit, I realized that I had to load the library that contains the model itself. In my case, I had to call library(kenlab) for Support Vectors.

1

Came across this thread while troubleshooting a similar problem and wanted to add my solutions. In particular, the answers above involve invoking library() inside of a package, which is strongly discouraged as it can unknowingly alter a user's library search path and lead to namespace conflicts. My answers may be case-specific, but they worked without requiring library() or require().

My goal was to create a package that would allow users to generate predictions from their own data using models that I had already created. These models would be hard-coded into the package. They included a kknn based k-nearest neighbor model and a rpart based decision tree model. Both were created using the tidymodels package.


Starting with the rpart tree model, since it was the most straightforward. When trying to run stats::predict(hla_tree$model, new_data = df), I originally received the same error as OP:

Error in UseMethod("predict") : no applicable method for 'predict'
    applied to an object of class c("_rpart", "model_fit")

Fortunately, in parsnip (the relevant part of tidymodels), predict.model_fit is an exported object, so this could be corrected by simply changing the line to parsnip::predict.model_fit(hla_tree$model, new_data = df)


The kknn k-nearest neighbor model was more challenging. After getting past the initial error as described above, I would get a different error

Error in get(ctr, mode = "function", envir = parent.frame()): object 'contr.dummy' of mode 'function' was not found

This error seemed specific to the kknn package and how the contr.dummy function was referred to as a quoted object within kknn(). My best guess of why this occurs is based on the order of how functions were loaded from the kknn namespace inside of a package. Inside of a package, a call to kknn() would end up referring to contr.dummy before contr.dummy() had been loaded into the namespace, resulting in the error when kknn() was called. Outside of a package, library(kknn) would add contr.dummy() to the name space at the start, so kknn() would succeed.

Fortunately, this had been addressed in a pending pull request to kknn. So I then took the following steps

  • Added the pull-request-specific package to the DESCRIPTION file with usethis::use_dev_package("kknn", remote = "https://github.com/KlausVigo/kknn#24")
  • Added @import kknn to the roxygen comment for my function
  • Changed the relevant predict line to stats::predict(knn_model$fit, df)

After these steps, the package passed all the devtools::check() steps and seemed to be working as intended.

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