I started using ASP.NET Core for my new REST API project after using regular ASP.NET Web API for many years. I don't see a good way to handle exceptions in ASP.NET Core Web API. I tried to implement exception handling filter/attribute:

public class ErrorHandlingFilter : ExceptionFilterAttribute
{
    public override void OnException(ExceptionContext context)
    {
        HandleExceptionAsync(context);
        context.ExceptionHandled = true;
    }

    private static void HandleExceptionAsync(ExceptionContext context)
    {
        var exception = context.Exception;

        if (exception is MyNotFoundException)
            SetExceptionResult(context, exception, HttpStatusCode.NotFound);
        else if (exception is MyUnauthorizedException)
            SetExceptionResult(context, exception, HttpStatusCode.Unauthorized);
        else if (exception is MyException)
            SetExceptionResult(context, exception, HttpStatusCode.BadRequest);
        else
            SetExceptionResult(context, exception, HttpStatusCode.InternalServerError);
    }

    private static void SetExceptionResult(
        ExceptionContext context, 
        Exception exception, 
        HttpStatusCode code)
    {
        context.Result = new JsonResult(new ApiResponse(exception))
        {
            StatusCode = (int)code
        };
    }
}

And here is my Startup filter registration:

services.AddMvc(options =>
{
    options.Filters.Add(new AuthorizationFilter());
    options.Filters.Add(new ErrorHandlingFilter());
});

The issue I was having is that when exception occurred in my AuthorizationFilter it's not being handled by ErrorHandlingFilter. I was expecting it to be caught there just like it worked with old ASP.NET Web API.

So how can I catch all application exceptions as well as any exceptions from Action Filters?

  • Have you tried UseExceptionHandler middleware? – Pawel Aug 3 '16 at 9:54
up vote 275 down vote accepted

Exception Handling Middleware

After many experiments with different exception handling approaches I ended up using middleware. It worked the best for my ASP.NET Core Web API application. It handles application exceptions as well as exceptions from filters and I have full control over exception handling and creating a response json. Here is my exception handling middleware:

public class ErrorHandlingMiddleware
{
    private readonly RequestDelegate next;

    public ErrorHandlingMiddleware(RequestDelegate next)
    {
        this.next = next;
    }

    public async Task Invoke(HttpContext context /* other dependencies */)
    {
        try
        {
            await next(context);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            await HandleExceptionAsync(context, ex);
        }
    }

    private static Task HandleExceptionAsync(HttpContext context, Exception exception)
    {
        var code = HttpStatusCode.InternalServerError; // 500 if unexpected

        if      (exception is MyNotFoundException)     code = HttpStatusCode.NotFound;
        else if (exception is MyUnauthorizedException) code = HttpStatusCode.Unauthorized;
        else if (exception is MyException)             code = HttpStatusCode.BadRequest;

        var result = JsonConvert.SerializeObject(new { error = exception.Message });
        context.Response.ContentType = "application/json";
        context.Response.StatusCode = (int)code;
        return context.Response.WriteAsync(result);
    }
}

Register it before MVC in Startup class:

app.UseMiddleware(typeof(ErrorHandlingMiddleware));
app.UseMvc();

Here is an example of exception response:

{ "error": "Authentication token is not valid." }

You can add stack trace, exception type name, error codes or anything you want to it. Very flexible. Hope it's a good starting point for you!

  • 1
    I have been beating my head against the desk trying to get a custom middleware to work today, and it works basically the same way (I'm using it to manage unit of work/transaction for a request). The problem I'm facing is that raised exceptions in 'next' are not caught in the middleware. As you can imagine, this is problematic. What am I doing wrong/missing? Any pointers or suggestions? – brappleye3 Feb 17 '17 at 2:43
  • 2
    I typically do a mix of both middleware and IExceptionFilter. The filter handles the controller errors directly, and I use the middleware for a more "low level" handling. As a hint, if someone needs to execute code by exception type in the global handler, to make it more "readable" feel free to give a look at a small library I made just for that: medium.com/@nogravity00/… – João Simões Feb 17 '17 at 19:35
  • 2
    @brappleye3 - I figured out what the problem was. I was just registering the middleware in the wrong place in the Startup.cs class. I moved app.UseMiddleware<ErrorHandlingMiddleware>(); to just before app.UseStaticFiles();. The exception seems to be caught correctly now. This leads me to believe app.UseDeveloperExceptionPage(); app.UseDatabaseErrorPage(); app.UseBrowserLink(); Do some internal magic middleware hackery to get the middleware ordering right. – DarthJam Mar 28 '17 at 10:36
  • 2
    I agree that custom middleware can be very useful but would question using exceptions for NotFound, Unauthorised and BadRequest situations. Why not simply set the status code (using NotFound() etc.) and then handle it in your custom middleware or via UseStatusCodePagesWithReExecute? See devtrends.co.uk/blog/handling-errors-in-asp.net-core-web-api for more info – Paul Hiles May 25 '17 at 19:35
  • 1
    I use a very simillar approach myself. I would just like to add that this middleware will serialize to json by default Uppercase property names, while MVC will do it with lowercase. This is easily fixable just by adding a JsonSerializerSettings with a CamelCasePropertyNamesContractResolver to the JsonConvert.SerializeObject(obj, settings) call. – Erik Božič Aug 1 at 11:02

Your best bet is to use Middleware to achieve logging you're looking for. You want to put your exception logging in one middleware and then handle your error pages displayed to the user in a different middleware. That allows separation of logic and follows the design Microsoft has laid out with the 2 middleware componenets. Here's a good link to Microsoft's documentation: Error Handling in ASP.Net Core

For your specific example, you may want to use one of the extensions in the StatusCodePage middleware or roll your own like this.

You can find an example here for logging exceptions: ExceptionHandlerMiddleware.cs

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app)
{
    // app.UseErrorPage(ErrorPageOptions.ShowAll);
    // app.UseStatusCodePages();
    // app.UseStatusCodePages(context => context.HttpContext.Response.SendAsync("Handler, status code: " + context.HttpContext.Response.StatusCode, "text/plain"));
    // app.UseStatusCodePages("text/plain", "Response, status code: {0}");
    // app.UseStatusCodePagesWithRedirects("~/errors/{0}");
    // app.UseStatusCodePagesWithRedirects("/base/errors/{0}");
    // app.UseStatusCodePages(builder => builder.UseWelcomePage());
    app.UseStatusCodePagesWithReExecute("/Errors/{0}");  // I use this version

    // Exception handling logging below
    app.UseExceptionHandler();
}

If you don't like that specific implementation, then you can also use ELM Middleware, and here are some examples: Elm Exception Middleware

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app)
{
    app.UseStatusCodePagesWithReExecute("/Errors/{0}");
    // Exception handling logging below
    app.UseElmCapture();
    app.UseElmPage();
}

If that doesn't work for your needs, you can always roll your own Middleware component by looking at their implementations of the ExceptionHandlerMiddleware and the ElmMiddleware to grasp the concepts for building your own.

It's important to add the exception handling middleware below the StatusCodePages middleware but above all your other middleware components. That way your Exception middleware will capture the exception, log it, then allow the request to proceed to the StatusCodePage middleware which will display the friendly error page to the user.

To Configure exception handling behavior per exception type you can use Middleware from NuGet packages:

Code sample:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.AddMvc();

    services.AddExceptionHandlingPolicies(options =>
    {
        options.For<InitializationException>().Rethrow();

        options.For<SomeTransientException>().Retry(ro => ro.MaxRetryCount = 2).NextPolicy();

        options.For<SomeBadRequestException>()
        .Response(e => 400)
            .Headers((h, e) => h["X-MyCustomHeader"] = e.Message)
            .WithBody((req,sw, exception) =>
                {
                    byte[] array = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(exception.ToString());
                    return sw.WriteAsync(array, 0, array.Length);
                })
        .NextPolicy();

        // Ensure that all exception types are handled by adding handler for generic exception at the end.
        options.For<Exception>()
        .Log(lo =>
            {
                lo.EventIdFactory = (c, e) => new EventId(123, "UnhandlerException");
                lo.Category = (context, exception) => "MyCategory";
            })
        .Response(null, ResponseAlreadyStartedBehaviour.GoToNextHandler)
            .ClearCacheHeaders()
            .WithObjectResult((r, e) => new { msg = e.Message, path = r.Path })
        .Handled();
    });
}

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env)
{
    app.UseExceptionHandlingPolicies();
    app.UseMvc();
}

First, configure ASP.NET Core 2 Startup to re-execute to an error page for any errors from the web server and any unhandled exceptions.

public void Configure(IApplicationBuilder app, IHostingEnvironment env)
{
    if (env.IsDevelopment()) {
        // Debug config here...
    } else {
        app.UseStatusCodePagesWithReExecute("/Error");
        app.UseExceptionHandler("/Error");
    }
    // More config...
}

Next, define an exception type that will let you throw errors with HTTP status codes.

public class HttpException : Exception
{
    public HttpException(HttpStatusCode statusCode) { StatusCode = statusCode; }
    public HttpStatusCode StatusCode { get; private set; }
}

Finally, in your controller for the error page, customize the response based on the reason for the error and whether the response will be seen directly by an end user. This code assumes all API URLs start with /api/.

[AllowAnonymous]
public IActionResult Error()
{
    // Gets the status code from the exception or web server.
    var statusCode = HttpContext.Features.Get<IExceptionHandlerFeature>()?.Error is HttpException httpEx ?
        httpEx.StatusCode : (HttpStatusCode)Response.StatusCode;

    // For API errors, responds with just the status code (no page).
    if (HttpContext.Features.Get<IHttpRequestFeature>().RawTarget.StartsWith("/api/", StringComparison.Ordinal))
        return StatusCode((int)statusCode);

    // Creates a view model for a user-friendly error page.
    string text = null;
    switch (statusCode) {
        case HttpStatusCode.NotFound: text = "Page not found."; break;
        // Add more as desired.
    }
    return View("Error", new ErrorViewModel { RequestId = Activity.Current?.Id ?? HttpContext.TraceIdentifier, ErrorText = text });
}

ASP.NET Core will log the error detail for you to debug with, so a status code may be all you want to provide to a (potentially untrusted) requester. If you want to show more info, you can enhance HttpException to provide it. For API errors, you can put JSON-encoded error info in the message body by replacing return StatusCode... with return Json....

Firstly, thanks to Andrei as I've based my solution on his example.

I'm including mine as it's a more complete sample and might save readers some time.

The limitation of Andrei's approach is that doesn't handle logging, capturing potentially useful request variables and content negotiation (it will always return JSON no matter what the client has requested - XML / plain text etc).

My approach is to use an ObjectResult which allows us to use the functionality baked into MVC.

This code also prevents caching of the response.

The error response has been decorated in such a way that it can be serialized by the XML serializer.

public class ExceptionHandlerMiddleware
{
    private readonly RequestDelegate next;
    private readonly IActionResultExecutor<ObjectResult> executor;
    private readonly ILogger logger;
    private static readonly ActionDescriptor EmptyActionDescriptor = new ActionDescriptor();

    public ExceptionHandlerMiddleware(RequestDelegate next, IActionResultExecutor<ObjectResult> executor, ILoggerFactory loggerFactory)
    {
        this.next = next;
        this.executor = executor;
        logger = loggerFactory.CreateLogger<ExceptionHandlerMiddleware>();
    }

    public async Task Invoke(HttpContext context)
    {
        try
        {
            await next(context);
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            logger.LogError(ex, $"An unhandled exception has occurred while executing the request. Url: {context.Request.GetDisplayUrl()}. Request Data: " + GetRequestData(context));

            if (context.Response.HasStarted)
            {
                throw;
            }

            var routeData = context.GetRouteData() ?? new RouteData();

            ClearCacheHeaders(context.Response);

            var actionContext = new ActionContext(context, routeData, EmptyActionDescriptor);

            var result = new ObjectResult(new ErrorResponse("Error processing request. Server error."))
            {
                StatusCode = (int) HttpStatusCode.InternalServerError,
            };

            await executor.ExecuteAsync(actionContext, result);
        }
    }

    private static string GetRequestData(HttpContext context)
    {
        var sb = new StringBuilder();

        if (context.Request.HasFormContentType && context.Request.Form.Any())
        {
            sb.Append("Form variables:");
            foreach (var x in context.Request.Form)
            {
                sb.AppendFormat("Key={0}, Value={1}<br/>", x.Key, x.Value);
            }
        }

        sb.AppendLine("Method: " + context.Request.Method);

        return sb.ToString();
    }

    private static void ClearCacheHeaders(HttpResponse response)
    {
        response.Headers[HeaderNames.CacheControl] = "no-cache";
        response.Headers[HeaderNames.Pragma] = "no-cache";
        response.Headers[HeaderNames.Expires] = "-1";
        response.Headers.Remove(HeaderNames.ETag);
    }

    [DataContract(Name= "ErrorResponse")]
    public class ErrorResponse
    {
        [DataMember(Name = "Message")]
        public string Message { get; set; }

        public ErrorResponse(string message)
        {
            Message = message;
        }
    }
}
  • 100% agree, no content negotiation is limited and not fully working approach – Konrad Sep 18 at 10:35

Well accepted answer helped me a lot but i wanted to pass HttpStatusCode in my middleware to manage error status code at runtime.

According to this link i got some idea to do the same. So i merged the Andrei Answer with this. So my final code is below:
1. Base class

public class ErrorDetails
{
    public int StatusCode { get; set; }
    public string Message { get; set; }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return JsonConvert.SerializeObject(this);
    }
}

2. Custom Exception Class Type

 public class HttpStatusCodeException : Exception
{
    public HttpStatusCode StatusCode { get; set; }
    public string ContentType { get; set; } = @"text/plain";

    public HttpStatusCodeException(HttpStatusCode statusCode)
    {
        this.StatusCode = statusCode;
    }

    public HttpStatusCodeException(HttpStatusCode statusCode, string message) : base(message)
    {
        this.StatusCode = statusCode;
    }

    public HttpStatusCodeException(HttpStatusCode statusCode, Exception inner) : this(statusCode, inner.ToString()) { }

    public HttpStatusCodeException(HttpStatusCode statusCode, JObject errorObject) : this(statusCode, errorObject.ToString())
    {
        this.ContentType = @"application/json";
    }

}


3. Custom Exception Middleware

public class CustomExceptionMiddleware
    {
        private readonly RequestDelegate next;

    public CustomExceptionMiddleware(RequestDelegate next)
    {
        this.next = next;
    }

    public async Task Invoke(HttpContext context /* other dependencies */)
    {
        try
        {
            await next(context);
        }
        catch (HttpStatusCodeException ex)
        {
            await HandleExceptionAsync(context, ex);
        }
        catch (Exception exceptionObj)
        {
            await HandleExceptionAsync(context, exceptionObj);
        }
    }

    private Task HandleExceptionAsync(HttpContext context, HttpStatusCodeException exception)
    {
        string result = null;
        context.Response.ContentType = "application/json";
        if (exception is HttpStatusCodeException)
        {
            result = new ErrorDetails() { Message = exception.Message, StatusCode = (int)exception.StatusCode }.ToString();
            context.Response.StatusCode = (int)exception.StatusCode;
        }
        else
        {
            result = new ErrorDetails() { Message = "Runtime Error", StatusCode = (int)HttpStatusCode.BadRequest }.ToString();
            context.Response.StatusCode = (int)HttpStatusCode.BadRequest;
        }
        return context.Response.WriteAsync(result);
    }

    private Task HandleExceptionAsync(HttpContext context, Exception exception)
    {
        string result = new ErrorDetails() { Message = exception.Message, StatusCode = (int)HttpStatusCode.InternalServerError }.ToString();
        context.Response.StatusCode = (int)HttpStatusCode.BadRequest;
        return context.Response.WriteAsync(result);
    }
}


4. Extension Method

public static void ConfigureCustomExceptionMiddleware(this IApplicationBuilder app)
    {
        app.UseMiddleware<CustomExceptionMiddleware>();
    }

5. Configure Method in startup.cs

app.ConfigureCustomExceptionMiddleware();
app.UseMvc();

Now my login method in Account controller :

 try
        {
            IRepository<UserMaster> obj = new Repository<UserMaster>(_objHeaderCapture, Constants.Tables.UserMaster);
            var Result = obj.Get().AsQueryable().Where(sb => sb.EmailId.ToLower() == objData.UserName.ToLower() && sb.Password == objData.Password.ToEncrypt() && sb.Status == (int)StatusType.Active).FirstOrDefault();
            if (Result != null)//User Found
                return Result;
            else// Not Found
                throw new HttpStatusCodeException(HttpStatusCode.NotFound, "Please check username or password");
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            throw ex;
        }

Above you can see if i have not found the user then raising the HttpStatusCodeException in which i have passed HttpStatusCode.NotFound status and a custom message
In middleware

catch (HttpStatusCodeException ex)

blocked will be called which will pass control to

private Task HandleExceptionAsync(HttpContext context, HttpStatusCodeException exception) method

.


But what if i got runtime error before? For that i have used try catch block which throw exception and will be catched in catch (Exception exceptionObj) block and will pass control to

Task HandleExceptionAsync(HttpContext context, Exception exception)

method.

I have used a single ErrorDetails class for uniformity.

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