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I would like to disable Alt & Application key in windows10 by editing registry key. I found this procedure:

HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\System\CurrentControlSet\Control

  • and click on Keyboard Layout
  • on Edit menu click Add value
  • type in Sancode Map,
  • click REG_BINARY as the Data Type and than click OK
  • insert 00000000000000000300000000005BE000005CE000000000
  • save & restart

as above is for Win keys i wanted to change it for Alt & Application key codes for Win keys are:

Left Win key -> 0x5B
Right Win key -> 0x5C

codes for Alt & Application keys are:

Application key -> 0x5D
Alt key -> 0x12

so i changed value from:

00000000000000000300000000005BE000005CE000000000

to:

00000000000000000300000000005DE0000012E000000000

...but i doesn't work. Any suggestions? I suspect value might be wrong but not sure how to validate.

  • The instructions you found are documented to work for Windows Embedded Standard 2009. Have you verified, that this is supported for your version of Windows as well? And have you really added the registry key "Sancode Map" (as opposed to "Scancode Map")? – IInspectable Jul 28 '16 at 10:34
  • Yes, I added "Scancode Map" as a key and yes it is supported for my version on windows 10 as it is working for Win key but doesnt work for Alt & Application keys so I am suspecting value must be wrong. I was following instruction from here – cheeroke Jul 28 '16 at 11:38
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    Keyboard and mouse class drivers explains the binary data structure for use with the scan code mapper. – IInspectable Jul 28 '16 at 11:49
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Ok, so

  1. procedure works (verified for Win10 IOT Enterprise 2015 LTSB)
  2. problem was with incorrect mapping for desired keys
  3. with help from @Ilnspectable I found correct mapping which is for Alt & Application keys: 38 & E0_5D respectively correct value should be:

    00,00,00,00,00,00,00,00,03,00,00,00,00,00,5D,E0,00,00,38,00,00,00,00,00

Note that in Windows they using byte format called little-endian (multi byte values are stored in memory from lowest values).

logic explained here

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