5

Some program that I am currently working on consumes much more memory than I think it should. So I am trying to understand how glibc malloc trimming works. I wrote the following test:

#include <malloc.h>
#include <unistd.h>

#define NUM_CHUNKS 1000000
#define CHUNCK_SIZE 100

int main()
{
    // disable fast bins
    mallopt(M_MXFAST, 0);

    void** array  = (void**)malloc(sizeof(void*) * NUM_CHUNKS);

    // allocating memory
    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < NUM_CHUNKS; i++)
    {
        array[i] = malloc(CHUNCK_SIZE);
    }

    // releasing memory ALMOST all memory
    for(unsigned int i = 0; i < NUM_CHUNKS - 1 ; i++)
    {
        free(array[i]);
    }

    // when enabled memory consumption reduces
    //int ret = malloc_trim(0);
    //printf("ret=%d\n", ret);

    malloc_stats();

    sleep(100000);
}

Test output (without calling malloc_trim):

Arena 0:
system bytes     =  112054272
in use bytes     =        112
Total (incl. mmap):
system bytes     =  120057856
in use bytes     =    8003696
max mmap regions =          1
max mmap bytes   =    8003584

Even though almost all memory was released, this test code consumes much more resident memory than expected:

[root@node0-b3]# ps aux | grep test
root     14662  1.8  0.4 129736 **118024** pts/10  S    20:19   0:00 ./test

Process smaps:

0245e000-08f3b000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0                                  [heap]
Size:             109428 kB
Rss:              109376 kB
Pss:              109376 kB
Shared_Clean:          0 kB
Shared_Dirty:          0 kB
Private_Clean:         0 kB
Private_Dirty:    109376 kB
Referenced:       109376 kB
Anonymous:        109376 kB
AnonHugePages:         0 kB
Swap:                  0 kB
KernelPageSize:        4 kB
MMUPageSize:           4 kB
Locked:                0 kB
VmFlags: rd wr mr mw me ac 
7f1c60720000-7f1c60ec2000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 
Size:               7816 kB
Rss:                7816 kB
Pss:                7816 kB
Shared_Clean:          0 kB
Shared_Dirty:          0 kB
Private_Clean:         0 kB
Private_Dirty:      7816 kB
Referenced:         7816 kB
Anonymous:          7816 kB
AnonHugePages:         0 kB
Swap:                  0 kB
KernelPageSize:        4 kB
MMUPageSize:           4 kB
Locked:                0 kB

When I enable the call to malloc_trim the output of the test stays almost the same:

ret=1
Arena 0:
system bytes     =  112001024
in use bytes     =        112
Total (incl. mmap):
system bytes     =  120004608
in use bytes     =    8003696
max mmap regions =          1
max mmap bytes   =    8003584

However, the RSS decreases significantly:

[root@node0-b3]# ps aux | grep test
root     15733  0.6  0.0 129688  **8804** pts/10   S    20:20   0:00 ./test

Process smaps (after malloc_trim):

01698000-08168000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0                                  [heap]
Size:             109376 kB
Rss:                   8 kB
Pss:                   8 kB
Shared_Clean:          0 kB
Shared_Dirty:          0 kB
Private_Clean:         0 kB
Private_Dirty:         8 kB
Referenced:            8 kB
Anonymous:             8 kB
AnonHugePages:         0 kB
Swap:                  0 kB
KernelPageSize:        4 kB
MMUPageSize:           4 kB
Locked:                0 kB
VmFlags: rd wr mr mw me ac 
7f508122a000-7f50819cc000 rw-p 00000000 00:00 0 
Size:               7816 kB
Rss:                7816 kB
Pss:                7816 kB
Shared_Clean:          0 kB
Shared_Dirty:          0 kB
Private_Clean:         0 kB
Private_Dirty:      7816 kB
Referenced:         7816 kB
Anonymous:          7816 kB
AnonHugePages:         0 kB
Swap:                  0 kB
KernelPageSize:        4 kB
MMUPageSize:           4 kB
Locked:                0 kB

After calling malloc_trim, the heap got shunked. I assume the 8MB mmap segment is still available because of the last piece of memory which wasn't released.

Why heap trimming isn't performed automatically by malloc? Is there a way to configure malloc such that trimming will be done automatically (when it can save that much of a memory)?

I am using glibc version 2.17.

  • If you are using a lot of memory and need it handled in particular ways, I recommend doing it yourself using mmap on POSIX and VirtualAlloc on Windows. – Zan Lynx Jul 28 '16 at 19:52
4

Largely for historical reasons, memory for small allocations comes from a pool managed with the brk system call. This is a very old system call — at least as old as Version 6 Unix — and the only thing it can do is change the size of an "arena" whose position in memory is fixed. What that means is, the brk pool cannot shrink past a block that is still allocated.

Your program allocates N blocks of memory and then deallocates N-1 of them. The one block it doesn't deallocate is the one located at the highest address. That is the worst-case scenario for brk: the size can't be reduced at all, even though 99.99% of the pool is unused! If you change your program so that the block it doesn't free is array[0] instead of array[NUM_CHUNKS-1], you should see both RSS and address space shrink upon the final call to free.

When you explicitly call malloc_trim, it attempts to work around this limitation using a Linux extension, madvise(MADV_DONTNEED), which releases the physical RAM, but not the address space (as you observed). I don't know why this only happens upon an explicit call to malloc_trim.

Incidentally, the 8MB mmap segment is for your initial allocation of array.

  • Thank you for your answer! I saw that the array indeed resides on the 8MB segment, and I also saw that array[N-1] resides at the end of the heap segment. If it is in the end of it, I now don't understand how it can be trimmed (when calling malloc_trim). – michael Jul 28 '16 at 19:44
  • I understand, thank you. Is there a way for me to reduce the amount of RSS memory consumed? Besides calling malloc_trim every now and then? – michael Jul 28 '16 at 19:52
  • 1
    The first thing I'd try is slotting in jemalloc. – zwol Jul 28 '16 at 19:59
  • Changing malloc implementation is not an option for me. – michael Jul 28 '16 at 20:06
  • 1
    Well, this is fundamentally a limitation in glibc's malloc, so if the control you get from mallopt and malloc_trim is not good enough, replacing the implementation is pretty much your only option. I did mention this limitation to the glibc developers, here: sourceware.org/ml/libc-alpha/2016-07/msg00646.html but that's probably not going to help you anytime soon, especially if you're stuck with 2.17 (when they're about to release 2.24). – zwol Jul 28 '16 at 20:15

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