65

It seems dplyr::case_when doesn't behave as other commands in a dplyr::mutate call. For instance:

library(dplyr)

case_when(mtcars$carb <= 2 ~ "low",
          mtcars$carb > 2 ~ "high") %>% 
  table

works:

.
high  low 
  15   17 

But put case_when in a mutate chain:

mtcars %>% 
  mutate(cg = case_when(carb <= 2 ~ "low",
                        carb > 2 ~ "high"))

and you get:

 Error: object 'carb' not found

while this works fine

mtcars %>% 
  mutate(cg = carb %>% 
           cut(c(0, 2, 8)))
4
  • 1
    Yes, it won't. Check the section on case_when here, and this
    – Sumedh
    Jul 29, 2016 at 2:38
  • as described below, this issue has gone away with dplyr > 0.7.0 Jul 5, 2017 at 19:45
  • Maybe accept one of the answers, looks like this now works.
    – zx8754
    Jan 29, 2019 at 17:42
  • In case you want to divide a range into several intervals, it is worth considering using cut instead of case_when. cut has a labels argument which makes it possible to rename the resulting categories. Feb 10, 2021 at 14:40

7 Answers 7

101

As of version 0.7.0 of dplyr, case_when works within mutate as follows:

library(dplyr) # >= 0.7.0
mtcars %>% 
  mutate(cg = case_when(carb <= 2 ~ "low",
                        carb > 2  ~ "high"))

For more information: http://dplyr.tidyverse.org/reference/case_when.html

2
  • 3
    dplyr < 0.7.0 would benefit from an error message indicating that this is resolved in 0.7.0 rather than Error: object 'carb' not found.
    – Paul
    Jan 19, 2018 at 18:41
  • For completeness' sake, you can add at the end: , .default = "other" as an "else" statement Apr 24, 2023 at 12:57
23

We can use .$

mtcars %>%  
     mutate(cg = case_when(.$carb <= 2 ~ "low",  .$carb > 2 ~ "high")) %>%
    .$cg %>%
    table()
# high  low 
#  15   17 
2
  • sure, I'm familiar with the . operator, but it's not necessary for cut, recode etc...
    – tomw
    Jul 29, 2016 at 2:39
  • 3
    @tomw I was just answering based on the question you posted and as per Sumedh's (deleted post), the case_when is stilll on a experimental stage so some of the regular things that works on other functions may not work here.
    – akrun
    Jul 29, 2016 at 2:40
8

With thanks to @sumedh: @hadley has explained that this is a known shortcoming of case_when:

case_when() is still somewhat experiment and does not currently work inside mutate(). That will be fixed in a future version.

0
6

In my case, quasiquotation helped a lot. You can create in advance a set of quoted formulae that define the mutation rules (and either use known column names as in the first formula or benefit from !! and create rules dynamically as in the second formula), which is then utilized within mutate - case_when combination like here

    library(dplyr)
    library(rlang)
    pattern <- quos(gear == 3L ~ "three", !!sym("gear") == 4L ~ "four", gear == 5L ~ "five")
    # Or
    # pattern <- list(
    #     quo(gear == 3L ~ "three"), 
    #     quo(!!sym("gear") == 4L ~ "four"),
    #     quo(gear == 5L ~ "five"))
    #
    mtcars %>% mutate(test = case_when(!!!pattern)) %>% head(10L)
#>     mpg cyl  disp  hp drat    wt  qsec vs am gear carb  test
#> 1  21.0   6 160.0 110 3.90 2.620 16.46  0  1    4    4  four
#> 2  21.0   6 160.0 110 3.90 2.875 17.02  0  1    4    4  four
#> 3  22.8   4 108.0  93 3.85 2.320 18.61  1  1    4    1  four
#> 4  21.4   6 258.0 110 3.08 3.215 19.44  1  0    3    1 three
#> 5  18.7   8 360.0 175 3.15 3.440 17.02  0  0    3    2 three
#> 6  18.1   6 225.0 105 2.76 3.460 20.22  1  0    3    1 three
#> 7  14.3   8 360.0 245 3.21 3.570 15.84  0  0    3    4 three
#> 8  24.4   4 146.7  62 3.69 3.190 20.00  1  0    4    2  four
#> 9  22.8   4 140.8  95 3.92 3.150 22.90  1  0    4    2  four
#> 10 19.2   6 167.6 123 3.92 3.440 18.30  1  0    4    4  four

I prefer such solution because it allows creating complex rules, e.g. using map2 with LHS conditions and RHS values to generate quoted formulas

    library(rlang)
    library(purrr)
    map2(c(3, 4, 5), c("three", "four", "five"), ~quo(gear == !!.x ~ !!.y))
#> [[1]]
#> <quosure>
#> expr: ^gear == 3 ~ "three"
#> env:  0000000014286520
#> 
#> [[2]]
#> <quosure>
#> expr: ^gear == 4 ~ "four"
#> env:  000000001273D0E0
#> 
#> [[3]]
#> <quosure>
#> expr: ^gear == 5 ~ "five"
#> env:  00000000125870E0

and using it in different places, applying to different data sets without the need to manually type in all the rules every time you need a complex mutation.

As a final answer to the problem, 7 additional symbols and two parentheses solve it

library(rlang)
library(dplyr)
mtcars %>% 
    mutate(test = case_when(!!!quos(gear == 3L ~ "three", gear != 3L ~ "not three"))) %>% 
    head(10L)
#>     mpg cyl  disp  hp drat    wt  qsec vs am gear carb      test
#> 1  21.0   6 160.0 110 3.90 2.620 16.46  0  1    4    4 not three
#> 2  21.0   6 160.0 110 3.90 2.875 17.02  0  1    4    4 not three
#> 3  22.8   4 108.0  93 3.85 2.320 18.61  1  1    4    1 not three
#> 4  21.4   6 258.0 110 3.08 3.215 19.44  1  0    3    1     three
#> 5  18.7   8 360.0 175 3.15 3.440 17.02  0  0    3    2     three
#> 6  18.1   6 225.0 105 2.76 3.460 20.22  1  0    3    1     three
#> 7  14.3   8 360.0 245 3.21 3.570 15.84  0  0    3    4     three
#> 8  24.4   4 146.7  62 3.69 3.190 20.00  1  0    4    2 not three
#> 9  22.8   4 140.8  95 3.92 3.150 22.90  1  0    4    2 not three
#> 10 19.2   6 167.6 123 3.92 3.440 18.30  1  0    4    4 not three

Created on 2019-01-16 by the reprex package (v0.2.1.9000)

0
data_2 = mutate(data, name = case_when(condition_new_var  ~ value, condition_new_var ~ value, condition_new_var ~ value))
1
  • 1
    Welcome to Stack Overflow! Please read How to Answer and edit your answer to contain an explanation as to why this code would actually solve the problem at hand. Always remember that you're not only solving the problem, but are also educating the OP and any future readers of this post.
    – Adriaan
    Nov 24, 2022 at 14:29
-2
library(dplyr) #loading the dplyr package

content150_fortified <- content150 %>% #creating a new variable
mutate(number_yn = case_when( #creating a new column using mutate
        number >= 18 & number <=25 ~ "no", # if number is "none", make number_yn "no"
        number!="none" ~ "yes"  # if number is not "none", make number_yn "yes"
        )
      )
1
  • Okay I'll try something different
    – varun
    Oct 18, 2018 at 22:32
-4

In addition to @akrun's answer above, be aware that the closing parenthesis for the case_when() cannot be put it onto its own line.

For example, this works OK:

mtcars %>%  
   mutate(cg = case_when(
      .$carb <= 2 ~ "low",  .$carb > 2 ~ "high")) 

but this does not:

mtcars %>%  
   mutate(cg = case_when(
      .$carb <= 2 ~ "low",  .$carb > 2 ~ "high")
      ) 
1
  • 3
    Huh? Both work fine for me. I can't imagine that the parser would have problems with something like this (as opposed to the underlying evaluator).
    – Hong Ooi
    Dec 15, 2016 at 5:09

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