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I am developing a REST API in ASP.Net Web API. My API will be only accessible via non-browser based clients. I need to implement security for my API so I decided to go with Token based authentication. I have a fair understanding of token based authentication and have read a few tutorials, but they all have some user interface for login. I don't need any UI for login as the login details will be passed by the client through HTTP POST which will be authorized from our database. How can I implement token based authentication in my API? Please note- my API will be accessed in high frequency so I also have to take care of performance. Please let me know if I can explain it any better.

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    someone, somewhere would have to put the username and password in in order to do the initial validation; are you suggesting that anyone who gets a copy of your app will use the same username and password? and if that's the case, are you intending to hard code the username and password values in your code?
    – Claies
    Jul 29, 2016 at 14:22
  • I can have multiple registered users, so initial login details will be passed by them via HTTP POST. Next is what? Jul 29, 2016 at 14:24
  • that doesn't make any sense. how can you server pass credentials to your client? how is the server supposed to know which client is which?
    – Claies
    Jul 29, 2016 at 14:24
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    You will have to programmatically authenticate, passing credentials to your Authentication service in your preferred way that doesn't require your user interface, which will pass you back a token. You can then use this token to make calls as you would usually.
    – plusheen
    Jul 29, 2016 at 14:25
  • @Claies Sorry for the confusion. The idea is to have the clients pass the login details and my API generate a token. Is this feasible? Please let me know if there is any other approach. Jul 29, 2016 at 14:28

2 Answers 2

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I think there is some confusion about the difference between MVC and Web Api. In short, for MVC you can use a login form and create a session using cookies. For Web Api there is no session. That's why you want to use the token.

You do not need a login form. The Token endpoint is all you need. Like Win described you'll send the credentials to the token endpoint where it is handled.

Here's some client side C# code to get a token:

    //using System;
    //using System.Collections.Generic;
    //using System.Net;
    //using System.Net.Http;
    //string token = GetToken("https://localhost:<port>/", userName, password);

    static string GetToken(string url, string userName, string password) {
        var pairs = new List<KeyValuePair<string, string>>
                    {
                        new KeyValuePair<string, string>( "grant_type", "password" ), 
                        new KeyValuePair<string, string>( "username", userName ), 
                        new KeyValuePair<string, string> ( "Password", password )
                    };
        var content = new FormUrlEncodedContent(pairs);
        ServicePointManager.ServerCertificateValidationCallback += (sender, cert, chain, sslPolicyErrors) => true;
        using (var client = new HttpClient()) {
            var response = client.PostAsync(url + "Token", content).Result;
            return response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result;
        }
    }

In order to use the token add it to the header of the request:

    //using System;
    //using System.Collections.Generic;
    //using System.Net;
    //using System.Net.Http;
    //var result = CallApi("https://localhost:<port>/something", token);

    static string CallApi(string url, string token) {
        ServicePointManager.ServerCertificateValidationCallback += (sender, cert, chain, sslPolicyErrors) => true;
        using (var client = new HttpClient()) {
            if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(token)) {
                var t = JsonConvert.DeserializeObject<Token>(token);

                client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Clear();
                client.DefaultRequestHeaders.Add("Authorization", "Bearer " + t.access_token);
            }
            var response = client.GetAsync(url).Result;
            return response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync().Result;
        }
    }

Where Token is:

//using Newtonsoft.Json;

class Token
{
    public string access_token { get; set; }
    public string token_type { get; set; }
    public int expires_in { get; set; }
    public string userName { get; set; }
    [JsonProperty(".issued")]
    public string issued { get; set; }
    [JsonProperty(".expires")]
    public string expires { get; set; }
}

Now for the server side:

In Startup.Auth.cs

        var oAuthOptions = new OAuthAuthorizationServerOptions
        {
            TokenEndpointPath = new PathString("/Token"),
            Provider = new ApplicationOAuthProvider("self"),
            AccessTokenExpireTimeSpan = TimeSpan.FromDays(14),
            // https
            AllowInsecureHttp = false
        };
        // Enable the application to use bearer tokens to authenticate users
        app.UseOAuthBearerTokens(oAuthOptions);

And in ApplicationOAuthProvider.cs the code that actually grants or denies access:

//using Microsoft.AspNet.Identity.Owin;
//using Microsoft.Owin.Security;
//using Microsoft.Owin.Security.OAuth;
//using System;
//using System.Collections.Generic;
//using System.Security.Claims;
//using System.Threading.Tasks;

public class ApplicationOAuthProvider : OAuthAuthorizationServerProvider
{
    private readonly string _publicClientId;

    public ApplicationOAuthProvider(string publicClientId)
    {
        if (publicClientId == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("publicClientId");

        _publicClientId = publicClientId;
    }

    public override async Task GrantResourceOwnerCredentials(OAuthGrantResourceOwnerCredentialsContext context)
    {
        var userManager = context.OwinContext.GetUserManager<ApplicationUserManager>();

        var user = await userManager.FindAsync(context.UserName, context.Password);
        if (user == null)
        {
            context.SetError("invalid_grant", "The user name or password is incorrect.");
            return;
        }

        ClaimsIdentity oAuthIdentity = await user.GenerateUserIdentityAsync(userManager);
        var propertyDictionary = new Dictionary<string, string> { { "userName", user.UserName } };
        var properties = new AuthenticationProperties(propertyDictionary);

        AuthenticationTicket ticket = new AuthenticationTicket(oAuthIdentity, properties);
        // Token is validated.
        context.Validated(ticket);
    }

    public override Task TokenEndpoint(OAuthTokenEndpointContext context)
    {
        foreach (KeyValuePair<string, string> property in context.Properties.Dictionary)
        {
            context.AdditionalResponseParameters.Add(property.Key, property.Value);
        }
        return Task.FromResult<object>(null);
    }

    public override Task ValidateClientAuthentication(OAuthValidateClientAuthenticationContext context)
    {
        // Resource owner password credentials does not provide a client ID.
        if (context.ClientId == null)
            context.Validated();

        return Task.FromResult<object>(null);
    }

    public override Task ValidateClientRedirectUri(OAuthValidateClientRedirectUriContext context)
    {
        if (context.ClientId == _publicClientId)
        {
            var expectedRootUri = new Uri(context.Request.Uri, "/");

            if (expectedRootUri.AbsoluteUri == context.RedirectUri)
                context.Validated();
        }
        return Task.FromResult<object>(null);
    }

}

As you can see there is no controller involved in retrieving the token. In fact, you can remove all MVC references if you want a Web Api only. I have simplified the server side code to make it more readable. You can add code to upgrade the security.

Make sure you use SSL only. Implement the RequireHttpsAttribute to force this.

You can use the Authorize / AllowAnonymous attributes to secure your Web Api. Additionally you can add filters (like RequireHttpsAttribute) to make your Web Api more secure. I hope this helps.

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    u said "for MVC you can use a login form and create a session using cookies. For Web Api there is no session" but form auth can be implemented in web api. so client can send the credentials to web api and web api will issue auth cookie to client. for all subsequent call client has to pass auth cookie to web api......i guess this is possible. Aug 3, 2016 at 8:10
  • picking your code as follows. new KeyValuePair<string, string>( "grant_type", "password" ), new KeyValuePair<string, string>( "username", userName ), new KeyValuePair<string, string> ( "Password", password ) what does mean grant_type=password ? what other option we can use with grant_type instead of password ? please share knowledge. thanks Aug 3, 2016 at 8:13
  • @MonojitSarkar These values are part of the OAuth 2.0 specifications. In particular tools.ietf.org/html/rfc6749. A nice summary of specifications can be found here: docs.identityserver.io/en/release/intro/specs.html
    – user4864425
    Apr 5, 2018 at 20:44
  • but how to check with this token in next process? means we store token into a database or not? after successful login how to maintain token? Jun 6, 2018 at 10:11
  • How can this be configured as a sub site where its parent is using windows authentication
    – mercu
    Oct 10, 2018 at 13:36
22

ASP.Net Web API has Authorization Server build-in already. You can see it inside Startup.cs when you create a new ASP.Net Web Application with Web API template.

OAuthOptions = new OAuthAuthorizationServerOptions
{
    TokenEndpointPath = new PathString("/Token"),
    Provider = new ApplicationOAuthProvider(PublicClientId),
    AuthorizeEndpointPath = new PathString("/api/Account/ExternalLogin"),
    AccessTokenExpireTimeSpan = TimeSpan.FromDays(14),
    // In production mode set AllowInsecureHttp = false
    AllowInsecureHttp = true
};

All you have to do is to post URL encoded username and password inside query string.

/Token/userName=johndoe%40example.com&password=1234&grant_type=password

If you want to know more detail, you can watch User Registration and Login - Angular Front to Back with Web API by Deborah Kurata.

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  • So I will create a POST request to /TOKEN with username and password in the HTTP Header/Body? I will have username and hashed password for all the users in my app database. How should I implement this? Jul 29, 2016 at 16:04
  • You need ASP.Net Identity (I believe you already have one). If not, create a ASP.Net Web API project and see the source code.
    – Win
    Jul 29, 2016 at 16:09
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    what is grant_type=password ? please share knowledge. thanks Aug 3, 2016 at 8:11
  • 4
    I think putting a username and password in the query string is a BAD BAD BAD idea.
    – frenchie
    Nov 5, 2018 at 11:24
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    @frenchie grant_type=password is OAuth 2.0 - Resource Owner Password Credentials Grant Type. It is not something we see in browser's navigation bar.
    – Win
    Nov 5, 2018 at 17:01

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