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Basically I would like to read the contents of all files in a commit based on the commit hash.

I've tried the following:

try(RevWalk revWalk = new RevWalk(gitRepository))
     {
        RevCommit commit = revWalk.parseCommit(ObjectId.fromString(commitSha));
        RevTree tree = commit.getTree();

        try(TreeWalk treeWalk = new TreeWalk(gitRepository))
        {
           treeWalk.addTree(tree);
           treeWalk.setRecursive(true);

           ObjectId entryId = null;

           while (treeWalk.next())
           {
              entryId = treeWalk.getObjectId(0);
           }

           ObjectLoader loader = gitRepository.open(entryId);
        }

        revWalk.dispose();
     }

but it seems to be picking up files from previous commits as well.

EDIT: I realize that I wasn't very specific in my original post.

Let's say I make a commit (Commit1) where I add a file (File1). Then I make a commit (Commit2) where I add a different file (File2). Then I make another commit (Commit3) where I modified File2. I would now like to get the contents of File2 from Commit2 for whatever reason. Using the above, the treewalk will retrieve the contents of Commit2 AND Commit1 which is not what I want.

  • Not sure that I understand when you ask about "previous commits": are you wanting to see only the commits that were changed between a commit and its parent? – Edward Thomson Jul 29 '16 at 18:41
  • I added an edit which I hope will clarify what I meant about "previous commits" – Amy Jul 29 '16 at 19:09
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As you've noticed, Git does not store a commit as a diff to the prior commit, it stores a commit as a snapshot of the entire repository at that point in time.

This is not terribly obvious, because even git show <commitid> will provide you with a diff between a commit and its parent. But it becomes clear when you iterate over the contents of a commit like you've done.

If you want to emulate git show <commitid> and look at what changes were introduced by a commit, you'll need to compare it to its parent.

Git git = new Git(gitRepository);

ObjectId newTreeId = ObjectId.fromString(commitSha + "^{tree}");
ObjectId oldTreeId = gitRepository.resolve(commitSha + "^^{tree}");

CanonicalTreeParser newTree = new CanonicalTreeParser();
newTree.reset(reader, newTreeId);

CanonicalTreeParser oldTree = new CanonicalTreeParser();
oldTree.reset(reader, oldTreeId);

for (DiffEntry de : git.diff().setNewTree(newTree).setOldTree(oldTree).call())
{
    /* Print the file diff */
    DiffFormatter formatter = new DiffFormatter(System.out);
    formatter.setRepository(gitRepository);
    formatter.format(de);
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you for the reply, it really helped my understanding of how Git works. However, I don't think the above code would work. Aren't newTreeId and oldTreeId commit ids and not tree ids? Also will DiffEntry show the actual changes in the files? – Amy Jul 29 '16 at 23:00
  • @Amy right you are, I think you'll need the ^{tree} syntax. I'll update the answer, but I'm doing this mostly from memory so I may be wrong about that. (Feel free to edit the answer if I've gotten this wrong.) – Edward Thomson Jul 29 '16 at 23:22
  • The above code is throwing a java.lang.NullPointerException upon reaching the first Commit. How shall i get the files of the first commit? – Varun Sharma Mar 30 '17 at 17:03

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