180

I'd like to parse the response of a web request, but I'm getting trouble accessing it as string.

func main() {
    resp, err := http.Get("http://google.hu/")
    if err != nil {
        // handle error
    }
    defer resp.Body.Close()
    body, err := ioutil.ReadAll(resp.Body)

    ioutil.WriteFile("dump", body, 0600)

    for i:= 0; i < len(body); i++ {
        fmt.Println( body[i] ) // This logs uint8 and prints numbers
    }

    fmt.Println( reflect.TypeOf(body) )
    fmt.Println("done")
}

How can I access the response as string? ioutil.WriteFile writes correctly the response to a file.

I've already checked the package reference but it's not really helpful.

302

bs := string(body) should be enough to give you a string.

From there, you can use it as a regular string.

A bit as in this thread
(updated after Go 1.16 -- Q1 2021 -- ioutil deprecation: ioutil.ReadAll() => io.ReadAll()):

var client http.Client
resp, err := client.Get(url)
if err != nil {
    log.Fatal(err)
}
defer resp.Body.Close()

if resp.StatusCode == http.StatusOK {
    bodyBytes, err := io.ReadAll(resp.Body)
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
    bodyString := string(bodyBytes)
    log.Info(bodyString)
}

See also GoByExample.

As commented below (and in zzn's answer), this is a conversion (see spec).
See "How expensive is []byte(string)?" (reverse problem, but the same conclusion apply) where zzzz mentioned:

Some conversions are the same as a cast, like uint(myIntvar), which just reinterprets the bits in place.

Sonia adds:

Making a string out of a byte slice, definitely involves allocating the string on the heap. The immutability property forces this.
Sometimes you can optimize by doing as much work as possible with []byte and then creating a string at the end. The bytes.Buffer type is often useful.

4
  • 1
    Thanks. Do you have any suggestion how could I have figured it out on my own? How does string() do that? Why can't I see it with reflect.TypeOf? Jul 30 '16 at 12:16
  • 1
    @TiborSzasz It is a simple conversion: see blog.golang.org/slices#TOC_12.
    – VonC
    Jul 30 '16 at 12:18
  • 1
    A small improvement to your code would be to use http.StatusOK instead of the raw 200 value!
    – Shadoninja
    Nov 1 '17 at 0:44
  • I've been doing this and finding that my request bodies always have a newline char at the end. Is this normal for a request body or is that cauased by ioutil.ReadAll()??
    – sixty4bit
    Apr 26 '18 at 16:14
44

The method you're using to read the http body response returns a byte slice:

func ReadAll(r io.Reader) ([]byte, error)

official documentation

You can convert []byte to a string by using

body, err := ioutil.ReadAll(resp.Body)
bodyString := string(body)
0
1

string(byteslice) will convert byte slice to string, just know that it's not only simply type conversion, but also memory copy.

1

Go 1.16+ update (February 2021)

Deprecation of io/ioutil

code should be

var client http.Client
resp, err := client.Get(url)
if err != nil {
    log.Fatal(err)
}
defer resp.Body.Close()

if resp.StatusCode == http.StatusOK {
    bodyBytes, err := io.ReadAll(resp.Body)
    // if u want to read the body many time
    // u need to restore 
    // reader := io.NopCloser(bytes.NewReader(bodyBytes))
    if err != nil {
        log.Fatal(err)
    }
    bodyString := string(bodyBytes)
    log.Info(bodyString)
}

reference

  1. https://golang.org/doc/go1.16#ioutil
  2. https://stackoverflow.com/a/52076748/2876087
1
  • Good point. I have updated my answer accordingly.
    – VonC
    Nov 16 '21 at 15:47

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.