I want to create a bit, that will contain security permissions for a given user.

In c#, I would do this by creating an enumeration, and then I would do some bit banging on the binary value, by anding '&&' to see if it results in a TRUE value.

How can I do this best in Ruby?

  • 2
    why do you want it be a bit field and not a hash or some other level concept? – einarmagnus Oct 5 '10 at 21:21
  • 2
    you mean bitwise and & not logical and &&, surely? – horseyguy Oct 5 '10 at 23:50
up vote 13 down vote accepted

If the underlying value is important then you can create a module that you use like an enum

module Groups
  ADMIN = 1
  BOSS = 2
  CLERK = 4
  MEAT = 8
  BREAD = 16
  CHEESE = 32
end

To set permissions just bitwise or them together

permissions = Groups::BOSS | Groups::MEAT | Groups::CHEESE

and to test you do a bitwise and

>> permissions & Groups::CHEESE > 0
=> true
>> permissions & Groups::BREAD > 0
=> false

I also like how you can make actual bitmasks more readable with _ like this

permissions = 0b0010_1010
  • I don't understand the last part, what is 0b0010_1010 ?? – Blankman Oct 6 '10 at 14:10
  • It's the same as p = 0b00101010, it's just a way to make binary literals more readable. – Jonas Elfström Oct 6 '10 at 16:45
  • 1
    You shouldn't make classes unless you plan to instantiate them. For this purpose you should use modules instead (module Groups...) – Hubro Oct 24 '13 at 7:41

Bitwse operations are trivial in Ruby.

> 1 | 2 # Create a bitmask from permission 2^0 + 2^1
=> 3

> 3 & 1 == 1 # See if the bitmask contains the 2^0 permission
=> true

> 3 & 4 == 4 # See if the bitmask contains the 2^2 permission
=> false

Ryan Bates talks about using bitwise operations for embedding associations in this podcast. You can read text version here.

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