2

I have a closure that captures and modifies its environment. I want to pass this closure to a function that accepts closures:

fn main() {
    let mut integer = 5;
    let mut closure_variable = || -> i32 {
        integer += 1;
        integer
    };
    execute_closure(&mut closure_variable);
}

fn execute_closure(closure_argument: &mut Fn() -> i32) {
    let result = closure_argument();
    println!("Result of closure: {}", result);
}

Because the closure modifies its environment, this fails:

error[E0525]: expected a closure that implements the `Fn` trait, but this closure only implements `FnMut`
 --> src/main.rs:3:32
  |
3 |       let mut closure_variable = || -> i32 {
  |  ________________________________^
4 | |         integer += 1;
5 | |         integer
6 | |     };
  | |_____^
7 |       execute_closure(&mut closure_variable);
  |                       --------------------- the requirement to implement `Fn` derives from here
  |
note: closure is `FnMut` because it mutates the variable `integer` here
 --> src/main.rs:4:9
  |
4 |         integer += 1;
  |         ^^^^^^^

As I understand from When does a closure implement Fn, FnMut and FnOnce?, this means that my closure actually is expanded to a struct that implements the trait FnMut. This trait is mutable, meaning calling the function changes the (implicit) object. I think this correct, because the variable integer should be modified after calling execute_closure().

How do I convince the compiler this is okay and that I actually want to call a FnMut function? Or is there something fundamentally wrong with how I use Rust in this example?

3

If you can change the function that accepts the closure...

Accept a FnMut instead of a Fn:

fn main() {
    let mut integer = 5;
    execute_closure(|| {
        integer += 1;
        integer
    });
}

fn execute_closure<F>(mut closure_argument: F)
where
    F: FnMut() -> i32,
{
    let result = closure_argument();
    println!("Result of closure: {}", result);
}

If you can not change the function that accepts the closure...

Use interior mutability provided by types like Cell or RefCell:

use std::cell::Cell;

fn main() {
    let integer = Cell::new(5);
    execute_closure(|| {
        integer.set(integer.get() + 1);
        integer.get()
    });
}

fn execute_closure<F>(closure_argument: F)
where
    F: Fn() -> i32,
{
    let result = closure_argument();
    println!("Result of closure: {}", result);
}

Or is there something fundamentally wrong with how I use Rust in this example?

Perhaps. An argument of type &mut Fn() -> i32 cannot mutate the variables it has closed over, so the error message makes sense to me.

It's kind of similar to the type &mut &u8 — you could alter the outer reference to point to another immutable reference, but you cannot "ignore" the inner immutability and change the numeric value.

Aside:

The original code uses dynamic dispatch because there is a trait object that provides indirection. In many cases you'd see this version that I posted above, which uses static dispatch and can be monomorphized. I've also inlined the closure as that's the normal syntax.

Here's the original version with just enough changes to work:

fn main() {
    let mut integer = 5;
    let mut closure_variable = || -> i32 {
        integer += 1;
        integer
    };
    execute_closure(&mut closure_variable);
}

fn execute_closure(closure_argument: &mut FnMut() -> i32) {
    let result = closure_argument();
    println!("Result of closure: {}", result);
}
  • Now that I see your answer I feel stupid I never realised that Fn in the function syntax is the name of the Trait it should implement. Thanks! As for the inlined closure, I believe that naming a variable is documenting it. An inlined closure is worse than a magic number. – Johan Jul 30 '16 at 19:56
  • @Johan I think you mean I feel like I know more today than I did yesterday ^_^. – Shepmaster Jul 30 '16 at 19:57

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.