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I have the following HTML structure to represent a calendar:

<table>
  <thead>...</thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>...</tr>
    <tr>
      <td day="4">...</td>
      <td day="5">...</td>
      <td day="6" class="is-startrange">...</td>
      <td day="7">...</td>
      <td day="8">...</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td day="9">...</td>
      <td day="10">...</td>
      <td day="11">...</td>
      <td day="12">
        <button class="day" type="button">12</button>
      </td>
      <td day="13">...</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

My question is: starting from the button under day 12, how can I traverse up, select all the button elements until a is-startrange class is encountered? Each table cell is a button representing a date and listeners have been added to all the button elements. When a date is clicked, I will get the selected date as starting point.

I want to add style to all the button elements between the start date and selected date (either add class or through pure CSS).

Is there a way this can be achieved in D3 selection or pure CSS?

4
  • 1
    Would using div's be okay instead of a table?
    – Ason
    Jul 31 '16 at 11:35
  • the structure is returned from an library (Pikaday.js) so I cannot change it
    – Sean
    Jul 31 '16 at 11:46
  • 1
    Just a side comment, not related to your question: when you say "traversing up", people thing about going up to the parent nodes in the DOM tree. Your case is not exactly "traversing up", because the td is-startrange is in a tr that is a sibling (regarding the tr of the button). Jul 31 '16 at 11:49
  • yes, I know it is not exactly upward. Because you need to traversing downward when you reach the previous <tr> tag to search for the is-startrange class. I don't how to describe this traversal accurately, so I just put traversing up.
    – Sean
    Jul 31 '16 at 12:04
2

As Gerardo Furtado already mentioned in his comment the question is not actually about traversing the DOM upwards, but rather about an iteration of td elements. This can easily be done by using d3.selectAll("td") which will yield a flattened selection of all tds found on the page. Depending on your layout you might need to further narrow the selection down to a specific table which could be done by adjusting the selector to "table.myTable td", "#tableId td" or the like.

Having this selection at hand you can apply a class, say range, by using selection.classed(names[, value]) which can take a function passed in as the second argument value:

If the value is a function, then the function is evaluated for each selected element, in order, being passed the current datum (d), the current index (i), and the current group (nodes), with this as the current DOM element. The function’s return value is then used to assign or unassign classes on each element.

The only task left is to implement a filter function which keeps track, if an element is within the desired or range or not and, thus, determines whether to assign the range class.

The following snippet shows how this could all be put together using a filter function rangeFilter() provided to .classed():

// The day parameter determines the stop criterion
function rangeFilter(day) {  
  // This property is closed over by the following function to keep track of the
  // range. If this is true, this element and following elements belong to the
  // range until this property becomes false again once reaching the button's td.
  var inRange = false;   
  
  // Filter function returning true, if the element belongs to the range.
  return function(d) {
    element = d3.select(this);   // The actual td element of this iteration step.
    // Evaluate if the element is still in the range or, in case the range has not
    // yet started, check if we reached the td.is-startrange.
    inRange = (inRange && element.attr("day") != day) 
            || element.classed("is-startrange");      

    // XOR to exclude the .is-startrange element.
    return inRange != element.classed("is-startrange"); 
  }
}

d3.selectAll("button")
  .on("click", function() {
    // For all tds check if they belong to the range and set the class based
    //  on the result of the filter function passing in this buttons value.
    d3.selectAll("td")
        .classed("range", rangeFilter(d3.select(this).text())); 
  });
.is-startrange {
  background-color: limegreen;
}

.range {
  background-color: red;
}
<script src="https://d3js.org/d3.v4.js"></script>
<h1>Hit the button</h1>
<table>
  <thead>...</thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>...</tr>
    <tr>
      <td day="4">...4...</td>
      <td day="5">...5...</td>
      <td day="6" class="is-startrange">...6...</td>
      <td day="7">...7...</td>
      <td day="8">...8...</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td day="9">...9...</td>
      <td day="10">...10...</td>
      <td day="11">...11...</td>
      <td day="12">
        <button class="day" type="button">12</button>
      </td>
      <td day="13">...13...</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

3
  • Thank you so much for the answer! However, I have a question: if I click on "12", rangeFilter(12) will be evaluated for each td element and var inRange = false will be run at the beginning for every selected elements? Then the checking seems not to work. It seems to me that rangeFilter(12) is only run at the first elements and the function it returned is used for the rest of the elements? Sorry I am quite new to javascript.
    – Sean
    Aug 1 '16 at 15:03
  • @Sean You are quite right. The approach uses two features which are fairly common in JS land, yet hard to comprehend for beginners. (1) Callbacks which e.g. in classed() will be called back for every element. Function rangeFilter will be called only once per click event and will return the callback function which is called for every element of that iteration. This brings us to (2) Closures. This concept is used to Aug 1 '16 at 15:21
  • @Sean avoid polluting the global namespace by closing over properties, whereby preserving their visibility in an inner scope although the outer scope is gone or has changed. In this example day and inRange are accessible from within the returned callback function although the scope of the outer function rangeFilter() is gone by then. This way the then private properties are used to preserve the state of the range between calls to the callback. Aug 1 '16 at 15:22

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