4

I'm trying to send a message with an IEnumerable property, am i correct that the NServiceBus Xml serializer cannot support this ? If i switch to using an array rather than IEnumerable it will work, if i use the binary serializer it also works

My message look like this

[Serializable]
public class Parent : IMessage
{
  public string Identifier { get; private set; }
  public IEnumerable<Child> Children { get; private set; }

  public Parent(string identifier, IEnumerable<Child> children)
  {
    this.Identifier = identifier;
    this.Children = children;
  }
}

[Serializable]
public class Child
{
  public string Identifier { get; private set; }
}  

If the default Xml serializer cannot cater for this, is there any way to configure an alternative Xml serializer such as the BCL's DataContractSerializer ?

Thanks in advance

Pat

6

First, a note that XML serialization in NServiceBus is not the same thing as .NET XML Serialization. The .NET variant is all about being able to tailor the resultant XML with attributes to produce specific XML schemas, potentially for interoperability with other languages. The NServiceBus XML serializer is an extremely small subset of functionality tailored to transfer predefined message schemas to and from XML as efficiently as possible.

While the result of NServiceBus serialization is readable (which is really nice when inspecting error queues) it doesn't support all types or all formatting options. It does what it does and it does it pretty well.

That said, the problem with an IEnumerable is that it could be so many things. It could, in reality, just be an array, but it could just as easily be a complex Linq-to-SQL expression that will invoke a database query. In order to serialize the IEnumerable, you'd have to represent it as a collection (a list or array) anyway, so you have to enumerate the items. When exactly would you do that? What problems with transactions might that raise? That's why the performance-conscious NServiceBus XML serializer doesn't bother.

An NServiceBus message is just a contract to pass message data. I would suggest just using an array. It's easy enough to convert an IEnumerable to an array (with the ToArray() extension method) and back (with the AsEnumerable() extension method) so why is it important to have it as an IEnumerable?

To fully answer your question, it should be possible to swap out the serializer by writing your own class that implements IMessageSerializer and configuring the dependency injection framework to use it, but I have not tried this myself. It would be quite an undertaking, since every single endpoint would have to utilize this same serializer, and you'd also have to make modifications in order to use the Distributor, TimeoutManager, Gateway, etc.

Edit: Noticed this question was cross-posted on NSB group at http://tech.groups.yahoo.com/group/nservicebus/message/8838

3
  • 1
    I've seent that the Xml serialization is taken care of in the NServiceBus.Serializers.XML.MessageSerializer type. The reason we wanted to go with IEnumerable was so that our messages would be immutable (Note the private sets in the properties). If i use an array the messages are no longer immutable as i can change an array item using the indexer and replacing the existing item with a new item. As you point out the delayed evaluation with IEnumerable is a problem. Thanks Pat
    – pmcgrath
    Oct 6 '10 at 10:12
  • 1
    @pmcgrath: I've battled with the whole mutable/immutable arguement but have come to the conclusion that it shouldn't matter if your messages are mutable as they shouldn't be your domain objects. The receiver should take the message and reconstruct that into a domain entity that is relevant for the task(s) it is about to preform. Oct 7 '10 at 7:46
  • This appears to be an issue with a Collection<int> property with no setter as well, which XmlSerializer supports.
    – TrueWill
    Sep 13 '11 at 22:06
3

is there any way to configure an alternative Xml serializer such as the BCL's DataContractSerializer ?

Yes, that is certainly possible. We use the DataContractSerializer for some of our services. To get this working, you need to implement the IMessageSerialzer interface, which does the work, then register that serializer with NServiceBus during the NServiceBus.Configure method chain.

Here's the code for the message serializer. It is pretty straightforward.

public class WcfMessageSerializer : IMessageSerializer
{
    private readonly IList<Type> knownTypes = new List<Type>();

    public IList<Type> MessageTypes
    {
        get { return knownTypes; }
        set
        {
            knownTypes.Clear();
            foreach (var type in value)
            {
                if (!type.IsInterface && typeof(IMessage).IsAssignableFrom(type)
                    && !knownTypes.Contains(type))
                {
                    knownTypes.Add(type);
                }
            }
        }
    }

    public void Serialize(IMessage[] messages, Stream stream)
    {
        var xws = new XmlWriterSettings
        {
            ConformanceLevel = ConformanceLevel.Fragment
        };
        using (var xmlWriter = XmlWriter.Create(stream, xws))
        {
            var dcs = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(IMessage), knownTypes);
            foreach (var message in messages)
            {
                dcs.WriteObject(xmlWriter, message);
            }
        }
    }

    public IMessage[] Deserialize(Stream stream)
    {
        var xrs = new XmlReaderSettings
        {
            ConformanceLevel = ConformanceLevel.Fragment
        };
        using (var xmlReader = XmlReader.Create(stream, xrs))
        {
            var dcs = new DataContractSerializer(typeof(IMessage), knownTypes);
            var messages = new List<IMessage>();
            while (false == xmlReader.EOF)
            {
                var message = (IMessage)dcs.ReadObject(xmlReader);
                messages.Add(message);
            }
            return messages.ToArray();
        }
    }
}

In order to plug this in, you could use an extension method such as the following:

public static class ConfigureWcfSerializer
{
    public static Configure WcfSerializer(this Configure config)
    {
        var messageTypes = Configure.TypesToScan
            .Where(t => typeof(IMessage).IsAssignableFrom(t))
            .ToList();

        config.Configurer
            .ConfigureComponent<WcfMessageSerializer>(ComponentCallModelEnum.Singleton)
            .ConfigureProperty(ms => ms.MessageTypes, messageTypes);

        return config;
    }
}

This would be invoked when you configure NServiceBus like so:

NServiceBus.Configure
    // Other configuration...
    .WcfSerializer()
    // Other configuration...
    .CreateBus()
    .Start();
5
  • This is an excellent example of how to implement a custom serializer. Keep in mind this will break down quickly if you try to use unobtrusive mode, since there is then no IMessage interface that everything implements, so the scanning for known types will fail. Jan 28 '13 at 19:27
  • @DavidBoike That's an excellent point. Although enabling this in unobtrusive mode is simply a case of replacing the expression in the Where method with the same expression that's used to configure unobtrusive mode, isn't it? Jan 29 '13 at 15:00
  • Yes, I think taht would take care of the issue, just based on the "in-brain compiler." That said, I think that attempting to use the WCF DataContractSerializer in the first place is an anti-pattern and should be avoided. Jan 29 '13 at 21:34
  • @DavidBoike Why would you say the DCS is an anti pattern? Other than the obvious requirement that all clients of the queue must also use the DCS. We first used the DCS to work around a problem where the built-in serializer couldn't properly handle a string property that held XML data, although that's long since been fixed, I believe. Jan 30 '13 at 8:12
  • DCS is a general purpose serializer designed to be able to serialize ANY data structure, with all of the extra features that requires, such as supporting polymorphism. The built-in NSB serializer, on the other hand, does not do polymorphism on purpose, because if a service understands Foo, it will not understand Bar even if Bar : Foo. The DCS, while a perfectly valid serializer, could lead you toward trouble in NSB just because of the things it supports doing, whereas the NSB serializer is more likely to pull you into that "pit of success" - that old bug you mention notwithstanding. Jan 30 '13 at 14:37

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