19

I am having some trouble understanding the behaviour in this snippet:

unsigned int i = 2;
const int &r = i;
std::cout << r << "\n";
i = 100;
std::cout << r << "\n";

The first print statement gives 2 as I expect, but when I change the value of the referenced variable, it is not reflected in the reference. The second print statement also gives 2, but I think it should give 100?

If I make variable i into type int instead of unsigned int, it works as I expect. What is going on here?

Live example

  • Shouldn't the reference be const unsigned int &r = i;? – πάντα ῥεῖ Jul 31 '16 at 14:11
  • Yes, I think it should be that, but I want to know why this particular snippet behaves this way. – KKOrange Jul 31 '16 at 14:12
  • ...is it undefined? I cannot find if that is true, the other answers make it seem like it is defined behaviour too. – KKOrange Jul 31 '16 at 14:22
  • No, it's not UB. The answers explain pretty well what's actually happening. – πάντα ῥεῖ Jul 31 '16 at 14:23
  • 4
    This is one reason why auto & is a thing. – nwp Jul 31 '16 at 14:24
33

You can only have a reference to an object of the same type.

You cannot have an int reference to an unsigned int.

What is happening here is, essentially:

const int &r = (int)i;

A new int temporary gets constructed, a new temporary object, and a const reference is bound to it.

Using your debugger, you should be able to observe the fact that the reference is referring to a completely different object:

(gdb) n
6   const int &r = i;
(gdb) 
7   std::cout << r << "\n";
(gdb) p i
$1 = 2
(gdb) p &i
$2 = (unsigned int *) 0x7fffffffea0c
(gdb) p &r
$3 = (const int *) 0x7fffffffe9fc
(gdb) q
9

The second print statement also gives 2, but I think it should give 100?

Because a temporary int is created here.

For const int &r = i;, i (unsigned int) needs to be converted to int at first, means a temporary int will be created and then be bound to r (temporary could be bound to lvalue reference to const), it has nothing to do with the original variable i any more.

If I make variable i into type int instead of unsigned int, it works as I expect.

Because no conversion and temporary is needed, i could be bound to r directly.

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