While there is plenty of information around on how to model, in JPA (2), a one-to-one relationship OR an entity having a natural key, I haven't been able to find a clear / simple answer to how to model the situation where we have both, i.e. a one-to-one relationship where the parent table has a natural key. It could obviously be that I might have missed such a tutorial; if so, pointing me to one could also be the answer.

And, as many times with JPA and noobs such as I, the moment one needs a bit more than the most basic model, one can quickly hit the wall.

Hence, considering the following DB model:

enter image description here

What would be the corresponding JPA-annotated object model? (I'm sparing you guys of the things I've tried since I don't want to influence the answer...)

Performance recommendations are also welcome (e.g. "a one-to-many could perform faster", etc.)!

Thanks,

  • The parent object has a composite PK, and so has @IdClass. The Child object has a single field annotated with @Id and a Parent reference. No idea how that is "non-standard". Who knows what "T_CHILD_C_PK" is. You put the FK at one side or the other, so I have to assume it is P_NK_1 and P_NK_2 in the Child – Neil Stockton Aug 1 '16 at 10:15
  • Indeed, the previous diagram was less than clear, thanks. I've updated the post with a (hopefully) clearer image. The parent table (T_PARENT) has a natural key formed of 2 fields, (PARENT_PK1, PARENT_PK2) and is being referenced by the child table T_CHILD. – Octavian Theodor Aug 1 '16 at 13:15
  • Your schema is clearer now, but the fact remains if you just have a @OneToOne in the Child back to the Parent then it maps simply (and the "parent" relation field in the Child gives the 2 FK columns in the CHILD table). – Neil Stockton Aug 2 '16 at 8:07
up vote 11 down vote accepted

Mapping a Composite Key is not difficult as illustrated in the following article.

The composite identifier is built out of two numerical columns so the mapping looks like this:

@Embeddable
public class EmployeeId implements Serializable {

    private Long companyId;

    private Long employeeId;

    public EmployeeId() {
    }

    public EmployeeId(Long companyId, Long employeeId) {
        this.companyId = companyId;
        this.employeeId = employeeId;
    }

    public Long getCompanyId() {
        return companyId;
    }

    public Long getEmployeeId() {
        return employeeId;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean equals(Object o) {
        if (this == o) return true;
        if (!(o instanceof EmployeeId)) return false;
        EmployeeId that = (EmployeeId) o;
        return Objects.equals(getCompanyId(), that.getCompanyId()) &&
                Objects.equals(getEmployeeId(), that.getEmployeeId());
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        return Objects.hash(getCompanyId(), getEmployeeId());
    }
}

The parent class, looks as follows:

@Entity(name = "Employee")
public static class Employee {

    @EmbeddedId
    private EmployeeId id;

    private String name;

    @OneToOne(mappedBy = "employee")
    private EmployeeDetails details;

    public EmployeeId getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(EmployeeId id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

    public EmployeeDetails getDetails() {
        return details;
    }

    public void setDetails(EmployeeDetails details) {
        this.details = details;
    }
}

And the child like this:

@Entity(name = "EmployeeDetails")
public static class EmployeeDetails {

    @EmbeddedId
    private EmployeeId id;

    @MapsId
    @OneToOne
    private Employee employee;

    private String details;

    public EmployeeId getId() {
        return id;
    }

    public void setId(EmployeeId id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public Employee getEmployee() {
        return employee;
    }

    public void setEmployee(Employee employee) {
        this.employee = employee;
        this.id = employee.getId();
    }

    public String getDetails() {
        return details;
    }

    public void setDetails(String details) {
        this.details = details;
    }
}

And everything works just fine:

doInJPA(entityManager -> {
    Employee employee = new Employee();
    employee.setId(new EmployeeId(1L, 100L));
    employee.setName("Vlad Mihalcea");
    entityManager.persist(employee);
});

doInJPA(entityManager -> {
    Employee employee = entityManager.find(Employee.class, new EmployeeId(1L, 100L));
    EmployeeDetails employeeDetails = new EmployeeDetails();
    employeeDetails.setEmployee(employee);
    employeeDetails.setDetails("High-Performance Java Persistence");
    entityManager.persist(employeeDetails);
});

doInJPA(entityManager -> {
    EmployeeDetails employeeDetails = entityManager.find(EmployeeDetails.class, new EmployeeId(1L, 100L));
    assertNotNull(employeeDetails);
});
doInJPA(entityManager -> {
    Phone phone = entityManager.find(Phone.class, "012-345-6789");
    assertNotNull(phone);
    assertEquals(new EmployeeId(1L, 100L), phone.getEmployee().getId());
});

Code available on GitHub.

  • Thanks Vlad! What I kinda' wanted to obtain was a member / property in the "parent" class (Employee in your example) giving me access to the child (EmployeeDetails). Something like: public class Employee { ... public EmployeeDetails getDetails() { ... } ... – Octavian Theodor Aug 1 '16 at 13:17
  • 1
    Check out my updated answer. – Vlad Mihalcea Aug 1 '16 at 13:50
  • Awesome -- thanks again! – Octavian Theodor Aug 2 '16 at 16:49

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