2

TL;DR

CDT ELF parser and ObjDump cannot parse my relocatable file, but both work properly with Executable File. I wonder if they are related.

ObjDump has wrong abbrev offsets, CDT parser throws BufferUnderflowException

The Problem

I'm working with Eclipse CDT ELF Parser in order to extract variable informations from my output files. With my exectuble files, it works perfectly. But with a relocatable file, it has problems to read it, but only after a certain point.

Edit: It seems the buffer underflow is not really the problem, but a consequence of data misinterpretation. Still testing to see how it is processing the file. I'll post more later

Analysis

At first I thought the dwarf section must be corrupted. Using ObjDump, the output file is incomplete with several errors. It actually only shows the types, but with wrong abbreviation numbers and offsets.

The log message:

$ C:\MinGW\bin\objdump.exe --dwarf %MYFILE% > %MYFILE%_objdump.txt

C:\MinGW\bin\objdump.exe: Warning: DIE at offset 0x1a9 refers to abbreviation number 8020 which does not exist
C:\MinGW\bin\objdump.exe: Warning: DIE at offset 0x1a9 refers to abbreviation number 8020 which does not exist
C:\MinGW\bin\objdump.exe: Warning: Unable to load/parse the .debug_info section, so cannot interpret the .debug_loc section.
C:\MinGW\bin\objdump.exe: Warning: Unable to load/parse the .debug_info section, so cannot interpret the .debug_ranges section.

Using readelf, however, it can read it perfectly, with all the sections and symbols. Regarding the other binaries, the readelf and the objdump outputs are the same.

In the debug_info with objdump I have for example:

Compilation Unit @ offset 0x170:
  Length:        0x7dc (32-bit)
  Version:       3
  Abbrev Offset: 0x0
  Pointer Size:  4

<0><17b>: Abbrev Number: 1 (DW_TAG_compile_unit)
   <17c>   DW_AT_producer    : (indirect string, offset: 0x0): object
   <180>   DW_AT_language    : 4    (C++)
   <181>   DW_AT_name        : (indirect string, offset: 0x0): object
   <185>   DW_AT_comp_dir    : (indirect string, offset: 0x0): object
   <189>   DW_AT_low_pc      : 0x0
   <18d>   DW_AT_high_pc     : 0x0
   <191>   DW_AT_stmt_list   : 0x0

<1><195>: Abbrev Number: 2 (DW_TAG_subprogram)
   <196>   DW_AT_name        : (indirect string, offset: 0x704): OK
   <19a>   DW_AT_decl_file   : 0
   <19b>   DW_AT_decl_line   : 0
   <19c>   DW_AT_low_pc      : 0x69050403
   <1a0>   DW_AT_high_pc     : 0x400746e
   <1a4>   DW_AT_frame_base  : 0 byte block:    ()
   <1a5>   DW_AT_sibling     : <0x2000170>
<2><1a9>: Abbrev Number: 8020

while with readelf

Compilation Unit @ offset 0x170:
  Length:        0x7dc (32-bit)
  Version:       3
  Abbrev Offset: 0xdb
  Pointer Size:  4

<0><17b>: Abbrev Number: 1 (DW_TAG_compile_unit)   
   <17c>   DW_AT_producer    : (indirect string, offset: 0x3c1): GNU C++ 4.8.1 -mlittle-endian -march=armv7-a -mfpu=vfp -mfloat-abi=softfp -mapcs-frame -mlong-calls -gdwarf-3 -ansi -fno-zero-initialized-in-bss    
   <180>   DW_AT_language    : 4    (C++)
   <181>   DW_AT_name        : (indirect string, offset: 0x192): C:/[...]
   <185>   DW_AT_comp_dir    : (indirect string, offset: 0x452): C:\[...]
   <189>   DW_AT_low_pc      : 0x50
   <18d>   DW_AT_high_pc     : 0x204
   <191>   DW_AT_stmt_list   : 0x4d

<1><195>: Abbrev Number: 2 (DW_TAG_base_type)
   <196>   DW_AT_byte_size   : 4
   <197>   DW_AT_encoding    : 7    (unsigned)
   <198>   DW_AT_name        : (indirect string, offset: 0x2a0): long unsigned int
<1><19c>: Abbrev Number: 3 (DW_TAG_base_type)

In the second compilation unit, ObjDump didn't change the abbrev Offset and therefore it is using the abbrev numbers from the first compilation unity. It means it is interpreting the next values as attribues of a different type - where it should be a base type, it reads as a subprogram.

Another important fact is that this firmware has dynamic allocation, unlike all the other ones that worked.

ELF Header:
Magic:   7f 45 4c 46 01 01 01 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 
Class:                             ELF32
Data:                              2's complement, little endian
Version:                           1 (current)
OS/ABI:                            UNIX - System V
ABI Version:                       0
Type:                              REL (Relocatable file)
Machine:                           ARM
Version:                           0x1
Entry point address:               0x0
Start of program headers:          0 (bytes into file)
Start of section headers:          18150404 (bytes into file)
Flags:                             0x5000000, Version5 EABI
Size of this header:               52 (bytes)
Size of program headers:           0 (bytes)
Number of program headers:         0
Size of section headers:           40 (bytes)
Number of section headers:         1636
Section header string table index: 1633

I know "objdump sees an ELF file through a BFD filter" while "the readelf program does not link against the BFD library". However, I couldn't find any relation between this and CDT ELF parser, though the problems points in this direction.

Questions

Well, it's a very dense problem with one thing linked to another, so I have a lot of questions. But feel free to answer only one, or half. Or even give me ideas about what to test.

  • What and why is it happening?
  • Can't ObjDump parse relocations(if the problem is there)?
  • Does ObjDump and CDT have libraries in common (from gcc maybe)?
  • How the readelf parses it's file? Is it possible to replicate it?

Edit

Because it was only with one of my elf files, and a very complex firmware, it is difficult to replicate it into a Minimal, Complete, and Verifiable example. But if you have an idea how I can give more information, please tell me.

  • Is there any chance of a minimal reproducible example for this issue? I am intrigued but I don't have enough to start with. – Jonah Graham Aug 1 '16 at 13:04
  • Hi @Jonah-graham, I found it very difficult to do a minimal exemple, mostly because I don't have a way to recompilate a minimal firmware in the same environment. What I did was to illustrate with the outcomes of the tools, I hope it helps. – souzaviv Aug 6 '16 at 11:24
  • sadly I am unlikely to be able to help fully. Hopefully someone else will be. If it was me, I would load up both readelf and objdump in a debugger to understand why they are seeing things differently. The other thing I note from your examples is that you are building for ARM, but are not using the ARM specific objdump/readelf. You may have more luck with arm-none-eabi-objcopy (or whatever it is called in your case) especially if it is a newer version. There are pre-built tools kept up to date here launchpad.net/gcc-arm-embedded. AFAIK the MinGW tools are not really up to date anymore. – Jonah Graham Aug 6 '16 at 13:15
  • Finally, if you have luck with up to date objdump, you may have simply exposed a bug in the Eclipse CDT code, if so, please raise a bug bugs.eclipse.org/bugs/enter_bug.cgi?product=CDT – Jonah Graham Aug 6 '16 at 13:15

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