Just curious as to how Skip & Take are supposed to work. I'm getting the results I want to see on the client side, but when I hook up the AnjLab SQL Profiler and look at the SQL that is being executed it looks as though it is querying for and returning the entire set of rows to the client.

Is it really returning all the rows then sorting and narrowing down stuff with LINQ on the client side?

I've tried doing it with both Entity Framework and Linq to SQL; both appear to have the same behavior.

Not sure it makes any difference, but I'm using C# in VWD 2010.

Any insight?

public IEnumerable<Store> ListStores(Func<Store, string> sort, bool desc, int page, int pageSize, out int totalRecords)
{
    var context = new TectonicEntities();
    totalRecords = context.Stores.Count();
    int skipRows = (page - 1) * pageSize;
    if (desc)
        return context.Stores.OrderByDescending(sort).Skip(skipRows).Take(pageSize).ToList();
    return context.Stores.OrderBy(sort).Skip(skipRows).Take(pageSize).ToList();
}

Resulting SQL (Note: I'm excluding the Count query):

SELECT 
[Extent1].[ID] AS [ID], 
[Extent1].[Name] AS [Name], 
[Extent1].[LegalName] AS [LegalName], 
[Extent1].[YearEstablished] AS [YearEstablished], 
[Extent1].[DiskPath] AS [DiskPath], 
[Extent1].[URL] AS [URL], 
[Extent1].[SecureURL] AS [SecureURL], 
[Extent1].[UseSSL] AS [UseSSL]
FROM [dbo].[tec_Stores] AS [Extent1]

After some further research, I found that the following works the way I would expect it to:

public IEnumerable<Store> ListStores(Func<Store, string> sort, bool desc, int page, int pageSize, out int totalRecords)
{
    var context = new TectonicEntities();
    totalRecords = context.Stores.Count();
    int skipRows = (page - 1) * pageSize;           
    var qry = from s in context.Stores orderby s.Name ascending select s;
    return qry.Skip(skipRows).Take(pageSize);           
}

Resulting SQL:

SELECT TOP (3) 
[Extent1].[ID] AS [ID], 
[Extent1].[Name] AS [Name], 
[Extent1].[LegalName] AS [LegalName], 
[Extent1].[YearEstablished] AS [YearEstablished], 
[Extent1].[DiskPath] AS [DiskPath], 
[Extent1].[URL] AS [URL], 
[Extent1].[SecureURL] AS [SecureURL], 
[Extent1].[UseSSL] AS [UseSSL]
FROM ( SELECT [Extent1].[ID] AS [ID], [Extent1].[Name] AS [Name], [Extent1].[LegalName] AS [LegalName], [Extent1].[YearEstablished] AS [YearEstablished], [Extent1].[DiskPath] AS [DiskPath], [Extent1].[URL] AS [URL], [Extent1].[SecureURL] AS [SecureURL], [Extent1].[UseSSL] AS [UseSSL], row_number() OVER (ORDER BY [Extent1].[Name] ASC) AS [row_number]
    FROM [dbo].[tec_Stores] AS [Extent1]
)  AS [Extent1]
WHERE [Extent1].[row_number] > 3
ORDER BY [Extent1].[Name] ASC

I really like the way the first option works; Passing in a lambda expression for sort. Is there any way to accomplish the same thing in the LINQ to SQL orderby syntax? I tried using qry.OrderBy(sort).Skip(skipRows).Take(pageSize), but that ended up giving me the same results as my first block of code. Leads me to believe my issues are somehow tied to OrderBy.

====================================

PROBLEM SOLVED

Had to wrap the incoming lambda function in Expression:

Expression<Func<Store,string>> sort
  • can you give us the code for the sort func? – Bryce Fischer Oct 6 '10 at 15:15
  • Sure, I'm just passing a lambda. Examples: x => x.Name, x => x.LegalName, x => x.YearEstablished.ToString() – Sam Oct 6 '10 at 15:28
  • Starting to think I should just pass a string then use a switch statement to set the appropriate orderby parameter for the LINQ query :( The first method was so much cooler and involved much less code. I can't understand why it isn't working properly. Without knowing exactly what is happening, it seems like .OrderBy and .OrderByDescending are triggering a database fetch, then applying the sort, then skipping and taking. Maybe that is it though...maybe OrderBy doesn't know how to convert x => x.Name into the appropriate SQL so it fetches the resultset then applies the ordering and filtering. – Sam Oct 6 '10 at 15:46
up vote 30 down vote accepted

The following works and accomplishes the simplicity I was looking for:

public IEnumerable<Store> ListStores(Expression<Func<Store, string>> sort, bool desc, int page, int pageSize, out int totalRecords)
{
    List<Store> stores = new List<Store>();
    using (var context = new TectonicEntities())
    {
        totalRecords = context.Stores.Count();
        int skipRows = (page - 1) * pageSize;
        if (desc)
            stores = context.Stores.OrderByDescending(sort).Skip(skipRows).Take(pageSize).ToList();
        else
            stores = context.Stores.OrderBy(sort).Skip(skipRows).Take(pageSize).ToList();
    }
    return stores;
}

The main thing that fixed it for me was changing the Func sort parameter to:

Expression<Func<Store, string>> sort
  • I had a similar problem. I spotted in SQL Profiler that the queries were simply SELECT * FROM's and traced it back to the fact that maybe this Expression<> parameter was missing from the call. I updated it (I was using EF4.1 for reference) and it solved my issue. – Amadiere Jul 19 '11 at 14:02
  • Anyone know why this is the case? I had the exact same issue. I thought I had kept my whole expression as an IQueryable without calling ToList or anything else that enumerates the expression. Does Func cause enumeration while Expression does not? – Brian Sweeney Jan 28 '14 at 17:52
  • @BrianSweeney The reason for this, I believe, is that if the sort query is not wrapped in an expression then linq is unable to build an expression tree for it in order to turn it into sql. Because of this it has to enumerate the query to sort it before doing the skip / take – Anduril Jul 30 '14 at 11:30
  • Making it generic; code public IEnumerable<TEntity> ListEntities(Expression<Func<TEntity, string>> sort, bool desc, int page, int pageSize, out int totalRecords) { totalRecords = _dbSet.Count(); int skipRows = (page - 1) * pageSize; if (desc) { return _dbSet.OrderByDescending(sort).Skip(skipRows).Take(pageSize).ToList(); } return _dbSet.OrderBy(sort).Skip(skipRows).Take(pageSize).ToList(); } code – Lost_In_Library Sep 28 '15 at 15:30
  • you solved my problem of pagination i have implement generic repository and i was getting problem i have taken your snippet and it solved. – Pramod mishra Apr 16 '17 at 15:33

As long as you don't do it like queryable.ToList().Skip(5).Take(10), it won't return the whole recordset.

Take

Doing only Take(10).ToList(), does a SELECT TOP 10 * FROM.

Skip

Skip works a bit different because there is no 'LIMIT' function in TSQL. However it creates an SQL query that is based on the work described in this ScottGu blog post.

If you see the whole recordset returned, it probably is because you are doing a ToList() somewhere too early.

  • Doing ToList() at the end. Example: db.Stores.OrderBy(x => x.Name).Skip(5).Take(5).ToList() – Sam Oct 6 '10 at 12:45
  • Yes, but earlier on. Is some other method doing a ToList() on your original set. – Jan Jongboom Oct 6 '10 at 13:39
  • Posted code above... – Sam Oct 6 '10 at 13:56
  • The code above won't return all your data. You either have to better look into the profiler, or you are doing ToList on some other place in code to this data. Try running the profiler when only doing this piece of code. – Jan Jongboom Oct 6 '10 at 14:22
  • I've used SQL Profiler for a long time and this function is the only one that is firing during the program execution (was looking at the underlying SQL to decide on entity framework vs nhibernate). I tried an alternative way of doing it and saw the SQL I expected (code & SQL above). However, I really like being able to pass a lambda expression for sorting as opposed to having to set it in the linq query. – Sam Oct 6 '10 at 14:51

Entity Framework 6 solution here...

http://anthonychu.ca/post/entity-framework-parameterize-skip-take-queries-sql/

e.g.

using System.Data.Entity;
....

int skip = 5;
int take = 10;

myQuery.Skip(() => skip).Take(() => take);
  • 1
    I think you misunderstood the question. OP never mentions parameterizing Skip and Take, only that they were not being executed in SQL (due to incorrectly using a Func<,> in the OrderBy instead of Expression<Func<,>>). This might be why you flagged my question as a duplicate even though they are not the same. – GWB Oct 30 '15 at 14:16

Try this:

public IEnumerable<Store> ListStores(Func<Store, string> sort, bool desc, int page, int pageSize, out int totalRecords)
{
    var context = new TectonicEntities();
    var results = context.Stores;

    totalRecords = results.Count();
    int skipRows = (page - 1) * pageSize;

    if (desc)
        results = results.OrderByDescending(sort);

    return results.Skip(skipRows).Take(pageSize).ToList();
}

in truth, that last .ToList() isn't really necessary as you are returning IEnumerable...

There will be 2 database calls, one for the count and one when the ToList() is executed.

  • results is an ObjectSet<Store> type. The results.OrderByDescending(sort) returns IOrderedEnumerable<Store> so it can't be assigned to results. You gave me a couple ideas on things to try though. Will post back once I've tested. – Sam Oct 6 '10 at 14:37
  • that's what they all return. Until you specify a .Select() or the .ToList(). – Bryce Fischer Oct 6 '10 at 14:44
  • Right, but the compiler prevents "if (desc) results = results.OrderByDescending(sort)" because the types are different. I also found out that I get an error when I use .Skip without calling .OrderBy first (happens when !desc). Posted edits to my original post with additional findings. – Sam Oct 6 '10 at 14:55

I created simple extension:

public static IEnumerable<T> SelectPage<T, T2>(this IEnumerable<T> list, Func<T, T2> sortFunc, bool isDescending, int index, int length)
{
    List<T> result = null;
    if (isDescending)
        result = list.OrderByDescending(sortFunc).Skip(index).Take(length).ToList();
    else
        result = list.OrderBy(sortFunc).Skip(index).Take(length).ToList();
    return result;
}

Simple use:

using (var context = new TransportContext())
{
    var drivers = (from x in context.Drivers where x.TransportId == trasnportId select x).SelectPage(x => x.Id, false, index, length).ToList();
}

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