0

I have the below data coming from DB. I would like to get the maximum of last digits after ".". For example data looks like this, where the last digits after last "." are 160410, 6, 16 etc.

I would like to get the "11.2.0.4.160419" output

 11.2.0.4.160419  
 11.2.0.4.6  
 11.2.0.4.16  
 11.2.0.4.10  
 11.2.0.4.18  
 11.2.0.4.2  
 11.2.0.4.14  
 11.2.0.4.4  
 11.2.0.4.160119  
 11.2.0.4.3  
 11.2.0.4.15  
 11.2.0.4.9  
 11.2.0.4.17  
 11.2.0.4.8  
 11.2.0.4.5  
 11.2.0.4.7  
 11.2.0.4.1  
 11.2.0.4.151117  
 11.2.0.4.13  
 11.2.0.4.12  
 11.2.0.4.20  
 11.2.0.4.11  
 11.2.0.4.19    

data before the "." are not same. It has various values. Infact the actual data is like this

DATABASE PATCH FOR EXADATA (JAN 2016 - 11.2.0.4.160119) : (22309110)      
DATABASE PATCH FOR EXADATA (JAN 2016 - 11.2.0.4.16) : (22309111)      
.  
.  

In this I am interested to get max of 160119.

-- Added

Sorry I am back again. We are looking for further where we need to get the result like this
11.2.0.4.160419
Meaning, the maximum of after "." , but when displaying display everything in between the parenthesis.
Actual data
'DATABASE PATCH FOR EXADATA (NOV 2015 - 11.2.0.4.151117)
DATABASE PATCH FOR EXADATA (APR2014 - 11.2.0.4.6) : (18293775)
DATABASE PATCH FOR EXADATA (APR2015 - 11.2.0.4.16) : (20449729)

desired output
(NOV 2015 - 11.2.0.4.151117)

I have this query working
with
inputs ( target_guid, description) as (
select t.target_guid, a.description from MGMT$OH_PATCH a, mgmt$oh_installed_targets oh,MGMT$TARGET_COMPONENTS c,MGMT$TARGET_FLAT_MEMBERS d, mgmt_targets t where t.target_type = 'oracle_dbmachine' and d.member_target_type = 'host' and d.aggregate_target_guid = t.target_guid and c.target_type = 'oracle_database' and c.host_name = d.member_target_name and a.host_name = c.host_name and a.target_guid = oh.oh_target_guid and oh.inst_target_type like '%database%' and a.description is not null and a.description like '%PATCH FOR EXADATA%' group by t.target_guid, a.description order by t.target_guid )
select target_guid, max(to_number(regexp_substr(description, '.(\d*))', 1, 1, null, 1))) as version
from inputs group by target_guid;
with the output of
5DA0496CCCD42CA1099F1AD06216F3C0 160419
ED10DD7D4C62CEAA117E7B7E97883EC2 9

I need the output as
5DA0496CCCD42CA1099F1AD06216F3C0 11.2.0.4.160419 ED10DD7D4C62CEAA117E7B7E97883EC2 11.2.0.4.9

Can you please help?

7
  • 1
    Probably the solution will involve some database-specific code. What RDBMS are you on? Aug 1 '16 at 14:10
  • 2
    What RDBMS are you using? MySQL, Oracle, Postgres, Sql Server? String tokenization techniques differ by DBMS.
    – JNevill
    Aug 1 '16 at 14:10
  • Sorry I am running Oracle.
    – Prakash
    Aug 1 '16 at 14:11
  • @Prakash - please look at how to format your posts. Do you already have the extracted value you originally showed, and just need to get the last element; or do you also really need to get it from the full string value you added later?
    – Alex Poole
    Aug 1 '16 at 14:36
  • OK... so if I understand correctly, you need to extract from longer strings (what you posted at the end are two VARCHAR2 values/strings, right?) So: is it guaranteed that the value you want to extract, 160119, is always after the last period (period means .) in the string? And you want to collect all the digits after . and before the closing )? Then- "maximum of last digits" - what does that mean? largest as a number? is 160019 greater than 18? (it seems so but just making sure).
    – mathguy
    Aug 1 '16 at 15:01
0

You can extract the last digits using:

select regexp_substr(col, '[0-9]+$', 1, 1)

If you don't like depending on the greediness of Oracle regular expressions (which I can appreciate), you can use:

select trim(leading '.' from regexp_substr(col, '[.][0-9]+$', 1, 1))

You can get the maximum value by converting to a numeric and taking the max:

select max(cast(regexp_substr(col, '[0-9]+$', 1, 1) as number))

To get the full column:

select t.*
from (select t.*
      from t
      order by cast(regexp_substr(col, '[0-9]+$', 1, 1) as number) desc
     ) t
where rownum = 1;

Finally, for your particular data, there is a simpler solution:

select t.*
from (select t.*
      from t
      order by length(col) desc, col desc
     ) t
where rownum = 1;

However, this assumes that all the stuff before the final '.' is the same.

4
  • the regexp would return . as well. simply use regexp_substr(col, '\d+$') to get the number at the end. Aug 1 '16 at 14:18
  • data before the "." are not same. It has various values. Infact the actual data is like this DATABASE PATCH FOR EXADATA (JAN 2016 - 11.2.0.4.160119) : (22309110) In this I am interested to get max of 160119
    – Prakash
    Aug 1 '16 at 14:24
  • @vkp - Picking up the period with the digits will actually make 1.3.16003 into the decimal fraction 0.16003. I am not sure if Gordon intended this or if it's a lucky (or unlucky??) accident. In any case, the OP wants the largest number (as in 160 is greater than 2), but the decimal fraction ordering will give 2 greater than 160.
    – mathguy
    Aug 1 '16 at 15:33
  • @vkp . . . You're right. The answer has been fixed. Aug 1 '16 at 18:23
0

If the assumptions I detailed in my Comment to your original question are correct, then something like this should work:

with
     inputs ( inp_str ) as (
       select 'DATABASE PATCH FOR EXADATA (JAN 2016 - 11.2.0.4.160119) : (22309110)' 
                                                                       from dual union all
       select 'DATABASE PATCH FOR EXADATA (JAN 2016 - 11.2.0.4.16) : (22309111)' from dual
     )
select max(to_number(regexp_substr(inp_str, '.(\d*)\)', 1, 1, null, 1))) as max_something
from   inputs;

The select statement is really just the last two lines; the rest is for testing purposes. Replace inp_str with your actual column name, inputs with your table name, and max_something with your desired output column name.

EDIT:

Here is a solution for the OP's restated problem (see request in comments).

with
     inputs ( inp_str ) as (
       select 'DATABASE PATCH FOR EXADATA (JAN 2016 - 11.2.0.4.160119) : (22309110)' 
                                                                       from dual union all
       select 'DATABASE PATCH FOR EXADATA (JAN 2016 - 11.2.0.4.16) : (22309111)' from dual
     )
select regexp_substr(inp_str, '\(([^)]+)\)', 1, 1, null, 1) as token
from   inputs
where  to_number(regexp_substr(inp_str, '.(\d*)\)', 1, 1, null, 1)) =
         ( select max(to_number(regexp_substr(inp_str, '.(\d*)\)', 1, 1, null, 1))) 
           from   inputs
         )
;

Output:

TOKEN
-------------------------
JAN 2016 - 11.2.0.4.160119

1 row selected.
6
  • Thanks. Will try this and let you know.
    – Prakash
    Aug 1 '16 at 16:42
  • Worked. Thank you so much.
    – Prakash
    Aug 2 '16 at 4:42
  • Sorry I am back again. We are looking for further where we need to get the result like this 11.2.0.4.160419 Meaning, the maximum of after "." , but when displaying display everything in between the parenthesis. Actual data 'DATABASE PATCH FOR EXADATA (NOV 2015 - 11.2.0.4.151117) DATABASE PATCH FOR EXADATA (APR2014 - 11.2.0.4.6) : (18293775) DATABASE PATCH FOR EXADATA (APR2015 - 11.2.0.4.16) : (20449729) desired output (NOV 2015 - 11.2.0.4.151117) Can you please help?
    – Prakash
    Aug 2 '16 at 5:45
  • So, is this always the first pair of parentheses, or can there be anything else in parentheses before that? And, you need to retrieve it WITH the parentheses like you said, or do you actually need just NOV 2015 - 11.2.0.4.151117 (without the parentheses)? Please clarify and I can add to my answer.
    – mathguy
    Aug 2 '16 at 10:33
  • This is always the first set of parameter. Data will always be like this DATABASE PATCH FOR EXADATA (JAN 2016 - 11.2.0.4.160119) : (22309110) DATABASE PATCH FOR EXADATA (Oct2015 - 11.2.0.4.22) : (22309112) , I just need starting from NOV 2015... without parenthesis
    – Prakash
    Aug 2 '16 at 15:28
-1

Maybe check out Oracle regexp_like e.g. WHERE REGEXP_LIKE(first_name, EXPRESSION)

1
  • Huh? Care to explain that?
    – mathguy
    Aug 1 '16 at 15:24

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