58

I am working on a project with ASP.NET CORE 1.0.0 and I am using EntityFrameworkCore. I have separate assemblies and my project structure looks like this:

ProjectSolution
   -src
      -1 Domain
         -Project.Data
      -2 Api
         -Project.Api

In my Project.Api is the Startup class

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {            
        services.AddDbContext<ProjectDbContext>();

        services.AddIdentity<IdentityUser, IdentityRole>()
                .AddEntityFrameworkStores<ProjectDbContext>()
                .AddDefaultTokenProviders();
    }

The DbContext is in my Project.Data project

public class ProjectDbContext : IdentityDbContext<IdentityUser>
{
    public ProjectDbContext(DbContextOptions<ProjectDbContext> options) : base(options)
    {

    }

    protected override void OnConfiguring(DbContextOptionsBuilder optionsBuilder)
    {

        var builder = new ConfigurationBuilder();
        builder.SetBasePath(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory());
        builder.AddJsonFile("appsettings.json");
        IConfiguration Configuration = builder.Build();

        optionsBuilder.UseSqlServer(
            Configuration.GetConnectionString("DefaultConnection"));
        base.OnConfiguring(optionsBuilder);
    }
}

When I try to make the initial migration, I get this error:

"Your target project 'Project.Api' doesn't match your migrations assembly 'Project.Data'. Either change your target project or change your migrations assembly. Change your migrations assembly by using DbContextOptionsBuilder. E.g. options.UseSqlServer(connection, b => b.MigrationsAssembly("Project.Api")). By default, the migrations assembly is the assembly containing the DbContext. Change your target project to the migrations project by using the Package Manager Console's Default project drop-down list, or by executing "dotnet ef" from the directory containing the migrations project."

After I seeing this error, I tried to execute this command located in Project.Api:

dotnet ef --startup-project ../Project.Api --assembly "../../1 Data/Project.Data" migrations add Initial

and I got this error:

"Unexpected value '../../1 Domain/Project.Data' for option 'assembly'"

I don't know why I get this error, when I try to execute the command with the '-assembly' parameter.

I can't create a Initial Migration from other assembly and I've searched for information about it but didn't got any results.

Has someone had similar issues?

14 Answers 14

82

All EF commands have this check:

if (targetAssembly != migrationsAssembly) 
       throw MigrationsAssemblyMismatchError;

targetAssembly = the target project you are operating on. On the command line, it is the project in the current working directory. In Package Manager Console, it is whatever project is selected in the drop down box on the top right of that window pane.

migrationsAssembly = assembly containing code for migrations. This is configurable. By default, this will be the assembly containing the DbContext, in your case, Project.Data.dll. As the error message suggests, you have have a two options to resolve this

1 - Change target assembly.

cd Project.Data/
dotnet ef --startup-project ../Project.Api/ migrations add Initial

// code doesn't use .MigrationsAssembly...just rely on the default
options.UseSqlServer(connection)

2 - Change the migrations assembly.

cd Project.Api/
dotnet ef migrations add Initial

// change the default migrations assembly
options.UseSqlServer(connection, b => b.MigrationsAssembly("Project.Api"))
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    I cant execute a command from Project.Data because is a classlibrary and it doesnt allow execute command, i only can execute command in Project.Api – kdar Aug 3 '16 at 5:43
  • Thanks , it was very useful ;) – Arash Nov 20 '17 at 12:18
  • 1
    Thanks, this helped after spending a lot of time on other solutions. – Pawan Pillai Mar 13 '18 at 16:20
  • Excellent explanation and examples, solved my problem immediately after wasting hours on other "solutions". Thank you!!! – Cydaps Oct 31 '18 at 16:43
  • 1
    Do you have any explanation or link to one as to why this check was implemented? What was the reason behind forbidding migrations when the context is from an other assembly? – Mathieu VIALES Feb 2 '19 at 14:01
52

I had the same problem until I noticed that on the package manager console top bar => "Default Projects" was supposed to be "Project.Data" and not "Project.API".

Once you target the "Project.Data" from the dropdown list and run the migration you should be fine.

default project selection

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    You saved my day!:) – StepUp Dec 28 '19 at 13:26
14

Using EF Core 2, you can easily separate your Web project from your Data (DbContext) project. In fact, you just need to implement the IDesignTimeDbContextFactory interface. According to Microsoft docs, IDesignTimeDbContextFactory is:

A factory for creating derived DbContext instances. Implement this interface to enable design-time services for context types that do not have a public default constructor. At design-time, derived DbContext instances can be created in order to enable specific design-time experiences such as Migrations. Design-time services will automatically discover implementations of this interface that are in the startup assembly or the same assembly as the derived context.

In the bottom code snippet you can see my implementation of DbContextFactory which is defined inside my Data project:

public class DbContextFactory : IDesignTimeDbContextFactory<KuchidDbContext>
{
    public KuchidDbContext CreateDbContext(string[] args)
    {
        var configuration = new ConfigurationBuilder()
            .SetBasePath(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory())
            .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json")
            .Build();

        var dbContextBuilder = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<KuchidDbContext>();

        var connectionString = configuration.GetConnectionString("Kuchid");

        dbContextBuilder.UseSqlServer(connectionString);

        return new KuchidDbContext(dbContextBuilder.Options);
    }
}

Now, I can initialize EF migration by setting my Web project as the StartUp project and selecting my Data project inside the Package Manager Console.

Add-Migration initial

You can find more details here. However, this blog post uses an obsoleted class instead of IDesignTimeDbContextFactory.

| improve this answer | |
  • Can confirm this works. We had a need for somewhat more complicated setup. It even works if the DbContext itself is located in a NuGet package. You can reference the context in the IDesignTimeDbContextFactory<YourNugetContext> implementation and it works. The only downside is you cannot run the "migrations add" command because it would attempt to add the migrations to where the db context is. You can only run "ef database update" and "ef database drop" in this fashion. – Ales Potocnik Hahonina Feb 18 '19 at 16:57
  • 2
    You have used .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json"). What if appsettings.json file do not exist in your .Data Project? – Himalaya Garg Jun 2 '19 at 7:22
  • There a 3.0/1 version of this? – WernerCD Sep 17 at 17:17
7

(ASP.NET Core 2+)

Had the same issue. Here is what I did:

  1. Reference the project that contains the DbContext (Project.A) from the project that will contain the migrations (Project.B).

  2. Move the existing migrations from Project.A to Project.B (If you don't have migrations - create them first)

  3. Configure the migrations assembly inside Project.A

options.UseSqlServer( connectionString, x => x.MigrationsAssembly("Project.B"));

Assuming your projects reside in the same parent folder:

  1. dotnet ef migrations add Init --p Project.B -c DbContext

The migrations now go to Project.B

Source: Microsoft

| improve this answer | |
6

I ran on the same problem and found this

We’re you trying to run your migrations on a class library? So was I. Turns out this isn’t supported yet, so we’ll need to work around it.

EDIT: I found solution on this git repo

| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you. I saw this solution but it seembed a little forced but so far it is the only solution I've seen it work. i will follow the link to get the news – kdar Aug 6 '16 at 12:26
  • Thanks a lot!! services.AddDbContext<EventbookingContext>(options => options.UseSqlServer(Configuration.GetConnectionString("DefaultConnection"), x => x.MigrationsAssembly("ClasslibraryGoesHere"))); – NetProvoke May 31 '17 at 19:59
4

Currently I think EF only supports to add migrations on projects not yet on class libraries.

And just side note for anybody else who wants to add migrations to specific folder inside your project:

EF CLI not support this yet. I tried --data-dir but it didn't work.

The only thing works is to use Package Manager Console:

  1. Pick your default project
  2. use -OutputDir command parameter, .e.g., Add-Migration InitConfigurationStore -OutputDir PersistedStores/ConfigurationStore command will output the mgiration to the folder 'PersistedStores/ConfigurationStore' in my project.

Updates as of 10/12/2017

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    ...

    string dbConnectionString = services.GetConnectionString("YOUR_PROJECT_CONNECTION");
    string assemblyName = typeof(ProjectDbContext).Namespace;

    services.AddDbContext<ProjectDbContext>(options =>
        options.UseSqlServer(dbConnectionString,
            optionsBuilder =>
                optionsBuilder.MigrationsAssembly(assemblyName)
        )
   );

   ...
}
| improve this answer | |
4

Add Migration With CLI Command:

dotnet ef migrations add NewMigration --project YourAssemblyName

Add Migration With PMC Command:

Add-Migration NewMigration -Project YourAssemblyName
| improve this answer | |
2

There are multiple projects included in the Solution.

Solution
|- MyApp (Startup Proj)
|- MyApp.Migrations (ClassLibrary)

Add-Migration NewMigration -Project MyApp.Migrations

Note: MyApp.Migrations also includes the DbContext.

| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Can you explain the context of this more to make it a better answer. – danblack Mar 28 '19 at 22:07
  • This was helpful, thank you. I placed my Migrations folder and DbContext in a class library and then reference the class library in my asp.net web app project. The reason is that I am also using the class library in a console app that will be a web job deployed to the same App Service in Azure. – tnk479 Jun 13 '19 at 12:20
2

The below command did the trick for me. I'm using VS Code and I run the following command:

SocialApp.Models> dotnet ef migrations add InitialMigartion --startup-project ../SocialApp.API

Courtesy: https://github.com/bricelam/Sample-SplitMigrations

| improve this answer | |
1

This is for EF Core 3.x.

Based on this answer from Ehsan Mirsaeedi and this comment from Ales Potocnik Hahonina, I managed to make Add-Migration work too.

I use Identity Server 4 as a NuGet package and it has two DB contexts in the package. Here is the code for the class that implements the IDesignTimeDbContextFactory interface:

public class PersistedGrantDbContextFactory : IDesignTimeDbContextFactory<PersistedGrantDbContext>
{
    public PersistedGrantDbContext CreateDbContext(string[] args)
    {
        var configuration = new ConfigurationBuilder()
            .SetBasePath(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory())
            .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json")
            .Build();

        var dbContextBuilder = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<PersistedGrantDbContext>();

        var connectionString = configuration.GetConnectionString("db");

        dbContextBuilder.UseSqlServer(connectionString, b => b.MigrationsAssembly("DataSeeder"));

        return new PersistedGrantDbContext(dbContextBuilder.Options, new OperationalStoreOptions() { ConfigureDbContext = b => b.UseSqlServer(connectionString) });
    }
}

Compared to the answer of Ehsan Mirsaeedi I modified these: I added the MigrationsAssembly:

dbContextBuilder.UseSqlServer(connectionString, b => b.MigrationsAssembly("DataSeeder"));

Where the "DataSeeder" is the name of my startup project for seeding and for migrations.

I added an options object with ConfigureDbContext property set to the connection string:

return new PersistedGrantDbContext(dbContextBuilder.Options, new OperationalStoreOptions() { ConfigureDbContext = b => b.UseSqlServer(connectionString) });

It is now usable like this: 'Add-Migration -Context PersistedGrantDbContext

At this point, when a migration has been created, one can create a service for this in a migration project having a method like this:

public async Task DoFullMigrationAsync()
        {
            using (var scope = _serviceProvider.GetRequiredService<IServiceScopeFactory>().CreateScope())
            {
                var persistedGrantDbContextFactory = new PersistedGrantDbContextFactory();

                PersistedGrantDbContext persistedGrantDbContext = persistedGrantDbContextFactory.CreateDbContext(null);
                await persistedGrantDbContext.Database.MigrateAsync();

                // Additional migrations
                ...
            }
        }

I hope I helped someone.

Cheers,

Tom

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0

I was facing similar issue, though answers seems straight forward somehow they didn't work. My Answer is similar to @Ehsan Mirsaeedi, with small change in DbContextFactory class. Instead of Adding migration assembly name in Startup class of API, I have mentioned in DbContextFactory class which is part of Data project(class library).

public class DbContextFactory : IDesignTimeDbContextFactory<KuchidDbContext>
{
   public KuchidDbContext CreateDbContext(string[] args)
   {
       var configuration = new ConfigurationBuilder()
          .SetBasePath(Directory.GetCurrentDirectory())
          .AddJsonFile("appsettings.json")
          .Build();

       var dbContextBuilder = new DbContextOptionsBuilder<KuchidDbContext>();

       var connectionString = configuration.GetConnectionString("connectionString");

       var migrationAssemblyName= configuration.GetConnectionString("migrationAssemblyName");

       dbContextBuilder.UseSqlServer(connectionString, o => o.MigrationAssembly(migrationAssemblyName));

       return new KuchidDbContext(dbContextBuilder.Options);
   }
}

You would need 'Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration' and 'Microsoft.Extensions.Configuration.Json' for SetBasePath & AddJsonFile extensions to work.

Note: I feel this is just a work around. It should pickup the DbContextOptions from the startup class somehow it is not. I guess there is definitely some wiring issue.

| improve this answer | |
0

I have resolved it by adding below line in Startup.cs. Hope it will help you also. I have used Postgres you can use Sql Server instead of that

     var migrationsAssembly = typeof(Startup).GetTypeInfo().Assembly.GetName().Name;
services.AddIdentityServer(options =>
            {
                options.Events.RaiseErrorEvents = true;
                options.Events.RaiseInformationEvents = true;
                options.Events.RaiseFailureEvents = true;
                options.Events.RaiseSuccessEvents = true; 

            }) 
                .AddSigningCredential(cert)
                 .AddCustomUserStore<IdentityServerConfigurationDbContext>()
                // this adds the config data from DB (clients, resources)
                .AddConfigurationStore(options =>
                {
                    options.ConfigureDbContext = builder =>
                        builder.UseNpgsql(connectionString,
                            sql => sql.MigrationsAssembly(migrationsAssembly));
                })
                // this adds the operational data from DB (codes, tokens, consents)
                .AddOperationalStore(options =>
                {
                    options.ConfigureDbContext = builder =>
                        builder.UseNpgsql(connectionString,
                            sql => sql.MigrationsAssembly(migrationsAssembly));

                    // this enables automatic token cleanup. this is optional.
                    options.EnableTokenCleanup = true;
                    options.TokenCleanupInterval = 30;
                });
| improve this answer | |
0

All you have to do, is modify your ConfigureServices like this:

    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.AddDbContext<ProjectDbContext>(item => item.UseSqlServer(
            Configuration.GetConnectionString("DefaultConnection"), 
            b => b.MigrationsAssembly("Project.Api")));

        services.AddIdentity<IdentityUser, IdentityRole>()
                .AddEntityFrameworkStores<ProjectDbContext>()
                .AddDefaultTokenProviders();
    }

By Default VS will use the Assembly of the project where the DbContext is stored. The above change, just tells VS to use the assembly of your API project.

You will still need to set your API project as the default startup project, by right clicking it in the solution explorer and selecting Set as Startup Project

| improve this answer | |
-1

For all of you who have multiple startup projects.

Notice that you need to set your target project as startup project - Project.Api(form the question example) should be the startup project.

Hope that will help someone :)

| improve this answer | |
  • Dependency Injection requires a single startup project. – RandyDaddis Apr 16 '19 at 18:09

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