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Any skew-symmetric matrix (A^T = -A) can be turned into a Hermitian matrix (iA) and diagonalised with complex numbers. But it is also possible to bring it into block-diagonal form with a special orthogonal transformation and find its eigevalues using only real arithmetic. Is this implemented anywhere in numpy?

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  • Why would you want that? The eigenvalues are the same either way. Commented Aug 2, 2016 at 16:04

2 Answers 2

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Let's take a look at the dgeev() function of the LAPACK librarie. This routine computes the eigenvalues of any real double-precison square matrix. Moreover, this routine is right behind the python function numpy.linalg.eigvals() of the numpy library.

The method used by dgeev() is described in the documentation of LAPACK. It requires the reduction of the matrix A to its real Schur form S.

Any real square matrix A can be expressed as:

A=QSQ^t

where:

  • Q is a real orthogonal matrix: QQ^t=I
  • S is a real block upper triangular matrix. The blocks on the diagonal of S are of size 1×1 or 2×2.

Indeed, if A is skew-symmetric, this decomposition seems really close to a block diagonal form obtained by a special orthogonal transformation of A. Moreover, it is really to see that the Schur form S of the skew symmetric matrix A is ... skew-symmetric !

Indeed, let's compute the transpose of S:

S^t=(Q^tAQ)^t
S^t=Q^t(Q^tA)^t
S^t=Q^tA^tQ
S^t=Q^t(-A)Q
S^t=-Q^tAQ
S^t=-S

Hence, if Q is special orthogonal (det(Q)=1), S is a block diagonal form obtained by a special orthogonal transformation. Else, a special orthogonal matrix P can be computed by permuting the first two columns of Q and another Schur form Sd of the matrix A is obtained by changing the sign of S_{12} and S_{21}. Indeed, A=PSdP^t. Then, Sd is a block diagonal form of A obtained by a special orthogonal transformation.

In the end, even if numpy.linalg.eigvals() applied to a real matrix returns complex numbers, there is little complex computation involved in the process !

If you just want to compute the real Schur form, use the function scipy.linalg.schur() with argument output='real'.

Just a piece of code to check that:

import numpy as np
import scipy.linalg as la

a=np.random.rand(4,4)
a=a-np.transpose(a)

print "a= "
print a

#eigenvalue
w, v =np.linalg.eig(a)

print "eigenvalue "
print w
print "eigenvector "
print v

# Schur decomposition
#import scipy
#print scipy.version.version

t,z=la.schur(a, output='real', lwork=None, overwrite_a=True, sort=None, check_finite=True)

print "schur form "
print t
print "orthogonal matrix "
print z
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Yes you can do it via sticking a unitary transformation in the middle of the product hence we get

A = V * U * V^-1 = V * T' * T * U * T' * T * V^{-1}.

Once you get the idea you can optimize the code by tiling things but let's do it the naive way by forming T explicitly.

If the matrix is even-sized then all blocks are complex conjugates. Otherwise we get a zero as the eigenvalue. The eigenvalues are guaranteed to have zero real parts so the first thing is to clean up the noise and then order such that the zeros are on the upper left corner (arbitrary choice).

n = 5
a = np.random.rand(n,n)
a=a-np.transpose(a)
[u,v] = np.linalg.eig(a)

perm = np.argsort(np.abs(np.imag(u)))
unew = 1j*np.imag(u[perm])

Obviously, we need to reorder the eigenvector matrix too to keep things equivalent.

vnew = v[:,perm]

Now so far we did nothing other than reordering the middle eigenvalue matrix in the eigenvalue decomposition. Now we switch from complex form to real block diagonal form.

First we have to know how many zero eigenvalues there are

numblocks = np.flatnonzero(unew).size // 2
num_zeros = n - (2 * numblocks)

Then we basically, form another unitary transformation (complex this time) and stick it the same way

T = sp.linalg.block_diag(*[1.]*num_zeros,np.kron(1/np.sqrt(2)*np.eye(numblocks),np.array([[1.,1j],[1,-1j]])))

Eigs = np.real(T.conj().T.dot(np.diag(unew).dot(T)))
Evecs = np.real(vnew.dot(T))

This gives you the new real valued decomposition. So the code all in one place

n = 5
a = np.random.rand(n,n)
a=a-np.transpose(a)
[u,v] = np.linalg.eig(a)

perm = np.argsort(np.abs(np.imag(u)))
unew = 1j*np.imag(u[perm])
vnew = v[perm,:]
numblocks = np.flatnonzero(unew).size // 2
num_zeros = n - (2 * numblocks)
T = sp.linalg.block_diag(*[1.]*num_zeros,np.kron(1/np.sqrt(2)*np.eye(numblocks),np.array([[1.,1j],[1,-1j]])))
Eigs = np.real(T.conj().T.dot(np.diag(unew).dot(T)))
Evecs = np.real(vnew.dot(T))
print(np.allclose(Evecs.dot(Eigs.dot(np.linalg.inv(Evecs))) - a,np.zeros((n,n))))

gives True. Note that this is the naive way of obtaining the real spectral decomposition. There are lots of places where you need to keep track of numerical error accumulation.

Example output

Eigs
Out[379]: 
array([[ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ],
       [ 0.        ,  0.        , -0.61882847,  0.        ,  0.        ],
       [ 0.        ,  0.61882847,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ],
       [ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        , -1.05097581],
       [ 0.        ,  0.        ,  0.        ,  1.05097581,  0.        ]])

Evecs
Out[380]: 
array([[-0.15419078, -0.27710323, -0.39594838,  0.05427001, -0.51566173],
       [-0.22985364,  0.0834649 ,  0.23147553, -0.085043  , -0.74279915],
       [ 0.63465436,  0.49265672,  0.        ,  0.20226271, -0.38686576],
       [-0.02610706,  0.60684296, -0.17832525,  0.23822511,  0.18076858],
       [-0.14115513, -0.23511356,  0.08856671,  0.94454277,  0.        ]])
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  • This code does not give True. Is there a bug somewhere ? does this need to be updated?
    – Nichola
    Commented Apr 15, 2022 at 20:57

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