In Angular2 I would have

"outDir": "dist/app"

in tsconfig.json. As a result the transpiled .js and .map files are generated in /dist/app/ folder and/or its sub folders. That works all fine.

In my components.ts files I also used referenced html and css like this

@Component({
  selector: 'my-app', 
  templateUrl: 'app/appshell/app.component.html',
  styleUrls: ['app/appshell/app.component.css'],
  ......
}

Is there any way to make compiler to also copy the referenced html and css files for the whole project? If yes, how would I configure my tsconfig.json?

I looked into the compiler options here https://www.typescriptlang.org/docs/handbook/compiler-options.html but didn't find anything about copying html/css files.

Update: My folder structure is like this

Root
  |--app       // for ts
  |--dist/app  // for js

tsconfig.json

"outDir": "dist/app"

package.json

{
  "name": "TestApp",
  "version": "1.0.0",
  "scripts": {
    "start": "tsc && concurrently \"tsc -w\" \"lite-server\" ",
    "html": "find ./app -name '*.html' -type f -exec cp --parents {} ./dist \\;",
    ......
}

It doesn't copy html files. There is no error though.

Update again:

For those who are on Linux OS, Bernardo's solution is a working one. For those who are on Windows OS, the following should work.

  "scripts": {
    "html": "XCOPY /S /y .\\app\\*.html .\\dist\\app" }
  • 1
    Just to expose you to ecosystems that you might not have considered, its easy to package everthing as JS today with TypeScript+React+FreeStyle (medium.com/@basarat/…) 🌹 – basarat Aug 1 '16 at 23:21
  • xcopy is deprecated. An good alternative would be a "static": "robocopy app dist\\app *.html *.css /e /purge" and a "build": "npm run start && npm run static". So you could build the whole app in one step or separately. – Nuno André Aug 22 at 14:39
up vote 11 down vote accepted

No, the TypeScript compiler is just for *.ts file.

You have to copy other files like *.html and *.css using a copy method like cp shell command inside a npm script or grunt-contrib-copy for example.

Example using npm script:

"scripts": {
  "html": "find ./app -name '*.html' -type f -exec cp --parents {} ./dist \\;"
}

Just run npm run html in the shell.

Example using grunt:

copy: {
      html: {
          src: ['**/*.html'],
          dest: 'dist',
          cwd: 'app',
          expand: true,
      }
}
  • Thanks for the reply. what is the syntax for npm recursive cp script? "html": "cp -R app/*.html dist/app/", does not work. – Shawn Aug 1 '16 at 22:15
  • @Shawn I've updated the npm html script. Now it'll copy all the *.html files keeping the directory structure. Please, test it. – Bernardo Pacheco Aug 1 '16 at 23:16
  • Bernardo, I tried your code. It didn't copy the html files. I updated my post to let you see what I did. Maybe I missed something. – Shawn Aug 2 '16 at 1:24
  • @Shawn thanks for the update, now I see what's wrong. You must copy to the ./dist folder instead of ./dist/app folder. The --parents already clone the folder structure. Use exactly the command that I put above. Also, you must have to ensure that the ./dist folder exist before you copy the html files. So, before running npm run html, the dist folder must exist. – Bernardo Pacheco Aug 2 '16 at 1:52
  • Bernardo, dist folder exists and I did exactly "html": "find ./app -name '*.html' -type f -exec cp --parents {} ./dist \\;". But it still didn't do it. – Shawn Aug 2 '16 at 4:45

For an OS independent solution, use copyfiles

npm install copyfiles --save-dev

Then add a script to package.json

"scripts": {
  "html": "copyfiles app/**/*.html app/**/*.css dist/"
}

Now npm run html should copy all css and html files from the app/ folder to dist/app/

EDIT: I'd like to amend my answer to point out angular-cli. This command line tooling utility is supported by the angular team and makes bundling a breeze (ng build --prod), among other things.

  • 4
    I had to add -u 1 to not include the main folder (src) as the destination folder name was different (dist) – Alejandro B. Dec 21 '17 at 19:38

From the Bernardo's answer I changed this

 "html": "find ./app -name '.html' -type f -exec cp --parents {} ./dist \\;" 
for this
"html": "cd app && tsc && find . \( -name '.html' -or -name '*.css' \) -type f -exec cp --parents {} ../dist \\;"
and is working good. Compile and copy html and css files in one instruction I also added this
"clean": "rm -rf dist"
in order to remove the whole directory dist. Hope this help!

This approach is provided by Microsoft:-
https://github.com/Microsoft/TypeScript-Node-Starter
Check out the file "copyStaticAssets". None of the solutions above worked for me, so I hope this helps someone like me.

As an alternative from my detailed answer here: https://stackoverflow.com/a/40694657/986160 could be to leave your css and html with the ts files. Then you can use module.id which will have the path pointing to the js of the component and after converting it accordingly you can essentially use relative paths :)

For your case I think something like that will work:

@Component({
   moduleId: module.id.replace("/dist/", "/"),
...
});

As an alternative using nodemon from my answer here: Watch template files and copy them to dist/ folder could be configured using package.json to put your css and html files with a simple copy commnad of your host OS.

But, in this days, you have Webpack in the Angular 4/5 ecosystem.

@yesh kumar, Thanks for sharing the link. Here the steps I did

  • Installshelljs
  • Add static assets to copyStaticAssets.ts file

import * as shell from "shelljs";

shell.cp("-R", "lib/certs", "dist/");

  • Configure ts-node copyStaticAssets.ts in package.json script section
    "scripts": {
      "build": "tsc && npm run copy-static-assets",
      "prod": "npm run build && npm run start",
      "copy-static-assets": "ts-node copyStaticAssets.ts"
     }

Your Answer

 

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.