I'm attempting to upgrade an old rails 2.x/ruby 1.8.7 application but I'm running into an issue. I have the string \200\001\002\004\b\020 and in my code I have something that looks like:

"\200\001\002\004\b\020"[0]

In 1.8.7 this returns the Fixnum 128. In ruby 1.9.3 (and newer) however this returns the String \x80.

My question is two part: First, what's happening here, and secondly how can I get a similar behavior to what's being returned in 1.8.7 in newer versions of ruby?

Update #1

As some have suggested I tried "\200\001\002\004\b\020".bytes[0] but this however doesn't work (it does work in 2.3.1 though) as it errors with:

 NoMethodError: undefined method `[]' for #<Enumerator: "\x80\u0001\u0002\u0004\b\u0010":bytes>
up vote 2 down vote accepted

To get the old behavior, use String#getbyte, as in:

"\200\001\002\004\b\020".getbyte(0)

  • 1
    This doesn't work in 1.9.3. It does however work in newer versions (verified on 2.3.1). – Kyle Decot Aug 1 '16 at 23:19
  • OK, I checked the 1.9.3 docs and found String#getbyte. – Olathe Aug 1 '16 at 23:27

1.8.7 gives a char code. 1.9.3 returns a substring.

To obtain the old behaviour, use "\200\001\002\004\b\020".bytes.to_a[0]

  • 1
    This doesn't work in 1.9.3. It does however work in newer versions (verified on 2.3.1). – Kyle Decot Aug 1 '16 at 23:19
  • Blegh. I didn't have an 1.9.3 repl handy. Probably have to call to_a to make the bytes enumerator indexable. – wirefox Aug 1 '16 at 23:59
  • Yeah. That's it. – wirefox Aug 2 '16 at 0:10

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