I am looking for a way to automatically add code to the start and the beginning of a function. The idea being that i want to profile the running code later. For example i have the functions:

void helloWorld(){
    printf("Hello World!\n");
}

void worldHello(){
    printf("World hello!\n");
}

I would like to have some kind of macro that expands them to:

void helloWorld(){
    printf("Function id 1 enter");
    printf("Hello World!\n");
    printf("Function id 1 exit");
}

void worldHello(){
    printf("Function id 2 enter");
    printf("World hello!\n");
    printf("Function id 2 exit");
}

Where the id is uniquely given each time i use my macro. Do anyoen have any good idea on how i could achieve this? i looked at the "__COUNTER__" in GCC but didnt really get it working as i wanted to.

  • 3
    Have you looked into Gprof yet? – Dave Kok Aug 2 '16 at 7:25
  • Fiddling too much with language basics -- like, say, replacing function declarations with some macro magic that adds code automatically -- might look like a good idea in the short term. But people (including yourself) will hate you long-term for it. ;-) Seconding Dave and Downvoter here, take a look at preexisting solutions. – DevSolar Aug 2 '16 at 7:36
  • No, didnt know about it, but i am running my code on a microprocessor, and i am planning on trying to set the id of the enabled functions using GPIO pins and reading and parsing the output on another hardware. I have very strict timings, and cant use the printout ways that i usually use. – Kristoffer Aug 2 '16 at 7:36
  • Note that in general, a function could be invoked recursively, so you might need to have multiple IDs for a function, depending on the depth of recursion. That may be less of a problem in a microprocessor — you're less likely to use recursion — but it is something to keep in mind. Also, threads will seriously put a twist in your code handling this. – Jonathan Leffler Aug 2 '16 at 7:38
  • 1
    By any chance, are you planning to use C++? Then you can simply create an object of a class right in the beginning of every function. Then use its constructor and destructor for code or id generation. – sameerkn Aug 2 '16 at 8:19
up vote 4 down vote accepted

If You are using GCC, look at -finstrument-functions switch - see https://gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Instrumentation-Options.html#index-finstrument-functions It basically calls user-defined function upon entering and leaving any called function. This has some advantages:

  • You don't have to modify Your functions at all.
  • Your code is called no matter how the function exitted (You can have any number of return in Your function and don't care)
  • This seems to indeed do what i want! Now the problem is how to somehow create som unique information on which function was invoked, and do it really fast. Semihosting is unfortuantely way to slow. I need microsecond resolution and dont have much memory to spare. – Kristoffer Aug 2 '16 at 10:50
  • The unique information You need, is the first argument of the __cyg_profile_func_enter(), which is pointer representing the called function. Now it depends on what exactly do You need to do in these enter/exit functions. – Roman Hocke Aug 2 '16 at 11:01

you can use the functions name instead of a number as ID. since function name is unique. for example you can use the macros:

#define START printf( "%s:%d Start \n", __func__, __LINE__)
#define END printf("%s:%d End \n", __func__, __LINE__)

or in kernel:

#define START pr_err(KBUILD_MODNAME ":%s:%d start \n", __func__, __LINE__)
#define END pr_err(KBUILD_MODNAME ":%s:%d end\n", __func__, __LINE__)
  • Multiple files could each have a separate static void function(void); function in it; function names are not necessarily unique across source files (though I think they are within a single file — I can't think of a way of evading that restriction). – Jonathan Leffler Aug 2 '16 at 16:53

It may be more descriptive to use __func__ rather than __COUNTER__. Here is an example implementation of a macro that does what you want.

#include <stdio.h>

#define WRAPPED_FUNC(funcname, ...) \
    funcname { \
        printf("Function %s entered\n", __func__); \
        __VA_ARGS__ \
        printf("Function %s exited\n", __func__); \
    }

WRAPPED_FUNC(
    void helloWorld(),
    {
        printf("Hello World!\n");
    }
)

WRAPPED_FUNC(
    void worldHello(),
    {
        printf("World hello!\n");
    }
)

int main() {
    helloWorld();
    worldHello();
    return 0;
}

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