39

The application logs all requested urls. This means, that it's critical not to authenticate using url parameters, because it would cause the situation in which logs are full of pairs (login=abc&password=123). For this reason I've configured spring-security to read parameters from request-body. It's done by adding the following line to the request-header:

'Content-Type': 'application/x-www-form-urlencoded'

The body will be:

{'login':'admin', 'password':'password'}

It's fine, but the QA forces me to disable the possibility of authentication via url paramters. At the moment a POST to the following URL will also authenticate:

https://example.com/foo?login=admin&password=password

Does anyone know a trick to disable this option? With an annotation preferably.

Due to the comment I decided to add some more details to my problem. My spring-security is configured with WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter. I have

http.usernameParameter("login")
    .passwordParameter("password")
(...)

This makes Spring searching login data in both - parameters and body. I wish to disable searching those parameters in the url.

1
  • 1
    In your endpoint put for RequestMapping put method = RequestMethod.POST @RequestMapping( value="/login", method=RequestMethod.POST )
    – ernestk
    Aug 2, 2016 at 10:06

4 Answers 4

15
+50

This makes Spring searching login data in both - parameters and body. I wish to disable searching those parameters in the url.

I believe this is not possible since this behaviour is not implemented by Spring rather than JavaEE itself.

HttpServletRequest.getParameter doc states:

Returns the value of a request parameter as a String, or null if the parameter does not exist. Request parameters are extra information sent with the request. For HTTP servlets, parameters are contained in the query string or posted form data.

But you can try to alter this with filter that should look something like this:

public class DisableGetAuthFiler extends OncePerRequestFilter {
    ...

    @Override
    protected void doFilterInternal(HttpServletRequest request, HttpServletResponse response, FilterChain filterChain) throws ServletException, IOException {
        filterChain.doFilter(
                new HttpServletRequestWrapper(request) {
                    @Override
                    public String getParameter(String name) {
                        if (("login".equals(name) && getQueryString().contains("login"))
                                || ("password".equals(name) && getQueryString().contains("password"))) {
                            return null;
                        } else {
                            return super.getParameter(name);
                        }
                    }
                },
                response
        );
    }
}

EDIT Haim Raman proposed another solution that uses existing filter instead of introducing a new one. Only I would suggest overriding obtainUsername() and obtainPassword() instead of attemptAuthentication().

4
  • 1
    Ive cheanged code example (minus NPE checks), original one was all wrong, sorry(
    – chimmi
    Aug 5, 2016 at 8:04
  • Thank you) Just dont forget to check for NPE - getQueryString() could be null
    – chimmi
    Aug 5, 2016 at 8:57
  • It solves my problem with QA. There is always a walk around possible - looking for an easy one.
    – xenteros
    Aug 23, 2016 at 9:23
  • @xenteros I am passing user credentials in x-www-form-urlencoded, but still it would be there in queryString so how can i restrict if user has passed parameters in url then I should throw exception ? Nov 21, 2019 at 3:55
8

I would like to suggest an alternative which is based on spring-security rater then a workaround as suggested by chimmi.

This answer provide a solution to the issue suggested by xenteros on bres26 answer as well

Override the exiting UsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter implementation

public class ImprovedUsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter 
                                    extends UsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter {

    @Override
    protected String obtainUsername(HttpServletRequest request) {
        final String usernameParameter = getUsernameParameter();
        validateQueryParameter(request, usernameParameter);
        return super.obtainUsername(request);
    }

    @Override
    protected String obtainPassword(HttpServletRequest request) {
        final String passwordParameter = getPasswordParameter();
        validateQueryParameter(request, passwordParameter);
        return super.obtainPassword(request);
    }

    private void validateQueryParameter(HttpServletRequest request, String parameter) {
        final String queryString = request.getQueryString();
        if (!StringUtils.isEmpty(queryString)) {
            if (queryString.contains(parameter))
                throw new AuthenticationServiceException("Query parameters for login are a prohibit, use message body only!");

        }
    }

 }

You need to replace your own implementation with the existing one (see doc here)

@Configuration
@EnableWebSecurity
public class WebSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {


    @Override
    protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
        http
            .authorizeRequests()
                .antMatchers("/", "/home","/login").permitAll()
                .anyRequest().authenticated()
                .and()
            .logout()
                .permitAll()
                .and()
             //Replace FORM_LOGIN_FILTER with your own custom implementation
             .addFilterAt(improvedUsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter(), UsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter.class)
               .exceptionHandling()
               .authenticationEntryPoint(new LoginUrlAuthenticationEntryPoint("/login"))
               .and()
            //disable csrf to allow easy testing
             .csrf().disable();
    }

    @Autowired
    public void configureGlobal(AuthenticationManagerBuilder auth) throws Exception {
        auth
                .inMemoryAuthentication()
                .withUser("user").password("password").roles("USER");
    }

    public UsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter improvedUsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter() throws Exception {
        UsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter authFilter = new ImprovedUsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter();
        authFilter.setRequiresAuthenticationRequestMatcher(
                new AntPathRequestMatcher("/login", "POST")
         );
        authFilter
        .setAuthenticationManager(authenticationManager());
        authFilter
       .setAuthenticationSuccessHandler(
           new SavedRequestAwareAuthenticationSuccessHandler()
        );
       authFilter
       .setAuthenticationFailureHandler(
         new SimpleUrlAuthenticationFailureHandler("/login?error")
       );
        return authFilter;
    }
}

Advantages: it’s based on spring security and flexible to changes.
Disadvantage: Unfortunately I found Spring Java Config very hard to set and to read

EDIT: I accepted chimmi comment and overridden obtainUsername and obtainPassword
You can find the source code in github.

6
+100

To the best of my knowledge and intuition, like jhan had mentioned, the appropriate solution would be to use annotation @RequestMapping(value="/login", method="RequestMethod.POST"). Then, no matter what parameters the user may pass with the URL, both the URL and URI will always default to /login. And that is what the logger will document. Not the username and password pairs, but "http://localhost:8080/login", or whatever your port is.

9
  • Logging with GET looks like an anti-pattern :) Anyway, thanks for replay!
    – xenteros
    Aug 3, 2016 at 11:55
  • 1
    I meant to write "POST", but I was distracted :D Correcting right now. Aug 3, 2016 at 11:56
  • 2
    It isn't a solution. If user passes http://localhost:8080/login?login=admin&password=password it'll still get logged as it is.
    – xenteros
    Aug 4, 2016 at 11:34
  • Another approach to the problem could be to try and rewrite the URL manually, so that the part after the ? is omitted. This, however, might be a bit sturdy to implement on your own. Alternatively, you could take advantage of springSecurityFilterChain here or implement a custom filter. A quick explanation of the latter could be found here: link. Aug 4, 2016 at 23:03
  • As I wrote before it's a very dangerous approach. It would cause someone adding some text to the penetrating requests so they match the pattern and don't get logged.
    – xenteros
    Aug 5, 2016 at 4:58
6

You can achieve this by modifying the UsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter's RequestMatcher. For example:

public class WebSecurityConfig extends WebSecurityConfigurerAdapter {

        @Override
        protected void configure(HttpSecurity http) throws Exception {
            http
                .formLogin()
                    .withObjectPostProcessor(new ObjectPostProcessor<UsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter>() {
                        @Override
                        public <O extends UsernamePasswordAuthenticationFilter> O postProcess(
                                O filter) {
                            AntPathRequestMatcher pathMatcher = new AntPathRequestMatcher("/login", "POST");
                            RequestMatcher noQuery = new RequestMatcher() {

                                @Override
                                public boolean matches(HttpServletRequest request) {
                                    return request.getQueryString() == null;
                                }
                            };
                            AndRequestMatcher matcher = new AndRequestMatcher(Arrays.asList(pathMatcher, noQuery));
                            filter.setRequiresAuthenticationRequestMatcher(matcher);
                            return filter;
                        }
                    })
                    .and()
                ...
        }
}

NOTE: The requirement below does not prevent a GET request from being issued (and thus leaking the credentials). It is really up to the UI to ensure this doesn't happen.

It's fine, but the QA forces me to disable the possibility of authentication via url paramters.

2
  • Can't rely on UI. What if someone curls me?
    – xenteros
    Aug 10, 2016 at 7:46
  • 1
    If they curl you, then it is their credentials that are leaked. What's more is just because you won't authenticate the user doesn't mean that the damage has been done. If a client send sensitive information in the query string, the damage is done (the credentials are possibly exposed) even if you don't authenticate the user.
    – Rob Winch
    Aug 10, 2016 at 15:20

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