172

In jsonSchema you can indicate whether defined fields are mandatory or not using the "required" attribute:

{
    "$schema": "http://json-schema.org/draft-04/schema#",
    "type": "object",
    "properties": {
        "header": {
            "type": "object",
            "properties": {
                "messageName": {
                    "type": "string"
                },
                "messageVersion": {
                    "type": "string"
                }
            },
            "required": [
                "messageName",
                "messageVersion"
            ]
        }
    },
    "required": [
        "header"
    ]
}

In certain cases, I would like the messageVersion field not to be mandatory. Is there any way to make the mandatory-ness of the this field conditional?

3
  • Yes, it should be possible. What information in the data would trigger the mandatory-ness? Aug 3, 2016 at 16:19
  • @SarveswaranMeenakshiSundaram - I don't know I've only used v4 of json schema Jan 16, 2017 at 11:24
  • Is this possible at all in version 3?
    – Sarvesh
    Jan 16, 2017 at 11:34

3 Answers 3

437

Depending on your situation, there are a few different approaches. I can think of four different ways to conditionally require a field.

Dependencies

The dependentSchemas keyword is a conditional way to apply a schema. Foreach property in dependentSchemas, if the property is present in the JSON being validated, then the schema associated with that key must also be valid. If the "foo" property is present, then the "bar" property is required

{
  "type": "object",
  "properties": {
    "foo": { "type": "string" },
    "bar": { "type": "string" }
  },
  "dependentSchemas": {
    "foo": { "required": ["bar"] }
  }
}

If all the dependent schema needs is the required keyword, you can use the dependentRequired keyword as a shorthand. The following has the same effect as the previous example.

{
  "type": "object",
  "properties": {
    "foo": { "type": "string" },
    "bar": { "type": "string" }
  },
  "dependentRequired": {
    "foo": ["bar"]
  }
}

NOTE: In draft-07 and below these were one keyword called dependencies. If the value is a schema it behaved like dependentSchemas. If the value is an array, it behaved like dependentRequired.

Implication

If your condition depends on the value of a field, you can use a boolean logic concept called implication. "A implies B" effectively means, if A is true then B must also be true. Implication can also be expressed as "!A or B". Either the "foo" property does not equal "bar", or the "bar" property is required. Or, in other words: If the "foo" property equals "bar", Then the "bar" property is required

{
  "type": "object",
  "properties": {
    "foo": { "type": "string" },
    "bar": { "type": "string" }
  },
  "anyOf": [
    {
      "not": {
        "properties": {
          "foo": { "const": "bar" }
        },
        "required": ["foo"]
      }
    },
    { "required": ["bar"] }
  ]
}

If "foo" is not equal to "bar", #/anyOf/0 matches and validation succeeds. If "foo" equals "bar", #/anyOf/0 fails and #/anyOf/1 must be valid for the anyOf validation to be successful.

NOTE: The if/then keywords have the same behavior, but are easier to read and maintain. It's recommended to only use this approach if you are using an older version of JSON Schema that doesn't support if/then.

Enum

If your conditional is based on an enum, it's a little more straight forward. "foo" can be "bar" or "baz". If "foo" equals "bar", then "bar" is required. If "foo" equals "baz", then "baz" is required.

{
  "type": "object",
  "properties": {
    "foo": { "enum": ["bar", "baz"] },
    "bar": { "type": "string" },
    "baz": { "type": "string" }
  },
  "anyOf": [
    {
      "properties": {
        "foo": { "const": "bar" }
      },
      "required": ["bar"]
    },
    {
      "properties": {
        "foo": { "const": "baz" }
      },
      "required": ["baz"]
    }
  ]
}

NOTE: This approach is not recommended because it can produce confusing error messages. The if/then keywords are generally a better approach.

If-Then-Else

The if, then and else keywords are shorthand for the implication pattern described above. These keywords were added in draft-07. If the "foo" property equals "bar", Then the "bar" property is required

{
  "type": "object",
  "properties": {
    "foo": { "type": "string" },
    "bar": { "type": "string" }
  },
  "if": {
    "properties": {
      "foo": { "const": "bar" }
    },
    "required": ["foo"]
  },
  "then": { "required": ["bar"] }
}

EDIT 12/23/2017: Implication section updated and If-Then-Else section added.

EDIT 06/04/2018: Bugfix for If-Then-Else and update singleton enums to use const.

EDIT 07/06/2022: Update Dependencies section to use the new dependentSchemas/dependentRequired keywords instead of dependencies.

20
  • 11
    @scubbo I'm not a fan of the if-then-else keywords and I refuse to use them. But, if you choose to use it, I suggest always wrapping them in an allOf that contains only those three keywords. { ...other_keywords..., "allOf": [{ "if": ..., "then": ..., "else": ... }], ...more_keywords... } Apr 5, 2018 at 0:20
  • 3
    @Jason Why not a fan of if...? I think a brief opinion on this in your answer would be entirely justified. Or is it a long story? May 14, 2018 at 13:46
  • 11
    @ClayBridges The comment section isn't the right place for that discussion, but here's the short version. As a general rule, JSON Schema keywords are stateless. No Information other than the keyword value can be used to validate the instance. if, then, and else violate this rule because they depend on each other. May 15, 2018 at 3:55
  • 6
    @GGirard, this is the best treatment of the use of these patterns in JSON Schema that I'm aware of. The boolean operations are officially documented but the rest is just math. allOf == AND, anyOf == OR, oneOf == XOR, and not == NOT. You can google "boolean algebra" for more resources on the math stuff (such as implication). Feb 27, 2019 at 17:26
  • 5
    Googled for conditional json schema and was led here. Fantastic answer, covers all aspects with simple examples. Well done. 👍
    – JHH
    Sep 18, 2019 at 5:05
5

As of 2022, dependencies has been deprecated, and split into dependentRequired (see e.g. this example) and dependentSchemas (see e.g. this example). Just using dependentRequired solves the issue:

{
  "type": "object",
  "properties": {
    "foo": { "type": "string" },
    "bar": { "type": "string" }
  },
  "dependentRequired": {
    "foo": ["bar"]
  }
}
-2

Found the solution to this. Using allOf works for me. Was just using a diff dependency altogether.

The right one to use for draft07 schema is :

<dependency>
    <groupId>com.github.erosb</groupId>
    <artifactId>everit-json-schema-jdk6</artifactId>
    <version>1.9.2</version>
</dependency>

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.