I am learning the R programming language with https://cran.r-project.org/doc/manuals/r-release/R-intro.pdf. The code below (p. 7, bottom of page) says 2*x will do 2.2 times, but what I can understand is 2*x says 2 multiplied with every element of X vector.

But the manual says 2.2 times; where is the 0.2 times coming from here? Or maybe I am looking at it in wrong way.

x <- c(10.4, 5.6, 3.1, 6.4, 21.7)
y <- c(x, 0, x)
v <- 2*x + y + 1

Generates a new vector v of length 11 constructed by adding together, element by element, 2*x repeated 2.2 times, y repeated just once, and 1 repeated 11 times.

Please help understanding this expression.

  • 3
    Note that this is from chapter 2 here: cran.r-project.org/doc/manuals/r-release/R-intro.pdf – Frank Aug 2 '16 at 14:48
  • 1
    This is probably because vector y is longer than x. So the indexing will start again at the beginning of x when there are elements left in y that have not been added up. – KenHBS Aug 2 '16 at 14:48
  • 4
    Not sure why you're targeting me. I'm just giving the context without which no one can hope to make sense of your question. The link is not for you -- obviously you know where you got it. – Frank Aug 2 '16 at 14:56
  • 1
    I down voted and voted to close the original version of this question, because without the reference to the manual, the question was simply 100% nonsense and unanswerable. The only reason this question ended up being even remotely understandable was because Frank was kind enough to add the link for you. If you can't write questions with sufficient context, then yes, down votes are what you can expect. – joran Aug 2 '16 at 14:58
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    @Raja Your original question contained (1) No reference to the book this came from, (2) No clear definition of x, (3) No clear definition of y. Without that information (which, again, was kindly added by others, not you) your question was not just unanswerable, it was literally gibberish. – joran Aug 2 '16 at 15:05
up vote 3 down vote accepted

The 2.2 is the number of times that x will be repeated (not what x will be multiplied by). In your example x has length 5 and y has length 11. The 2.2 comes because 2.2 times 5 is 11, so in order to have 2 vectors of the same length to add together, the shorter one (the result of 2*x) which has length 5 has to be repeated (the 2.) then one more element taken from that vector to make the total length 11.

This might be a little more clear if you set y <- rep(0,11) so that y is still 11 long, but is now 0, so when you do the adding you can see exactly what happens with 2*x (since adding the vector of 0's will do the replication, but not change the values).

The phrasing in what you quote is a little awkward in not making a clear distinction between multiplication (2*) and replication (2.2 times).

  • Man you are just awesome. Why those cant be as you. Now I understand. Thank you very much, – rɑːdʒɑ Aug 2 '16 at 15:12

In R, arithmetic operators are vectorized. If x is a vector, each element of the vector will be multiplied by 2.

1:10
# [1]  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10
2 * 1:10
# [1]  2  4  6  8 10 12 14 16 18 20
2 * 1:10 + 1
# [1]  3  5  7  9 11 13 15 17 19 21

To learn more, type ?"*" in an R console.

In your example, you may be observing unexpected behavior if x and y are different lengths.

For example:

1:10 + 1:2
# [1]  2  4  4  6  6  8  8 10 10 12
1:10 + 1:3
# [1]  2  4  6  5  7  9  8 10 12 11
Warning message:
In 1:10 + 1:3 :
  longer object length is not a multiple of shorter object length
  • After reading greg answer , I understand it and felt you are answer also good. Thank you. – rɑːdʒɑ Aug 2 '16 at 15:13

From the PDF:

x <- c(10.4, 5.6, 3.1, 6.4, 21.7) # length 5
y <- c(x, 0, x) # length 11

The 2.2 comes simply from the fact that R repeats x 2.2 times to make it length 11, so the expression 2*x + y + 1 is implicitly doing

2 * c(10.4, 5.6, 3.1, 6.4, 21.7, 10.4, 5.6, 3.1, 6.4, 21.7, 10.4) + 
c(10.4, 5.6, 3.1, 6.4, 21.7, 0, 10.4, 5.6, 3.1, 6.4, 21.7) +
c(1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1)

The complete example is:

x <- c(10.4, 5.6, 3.1, 6.4, 21.7)
y <- c(x, 0, x)
v <- 2*x + y + 1

Note that the length of x is 5 but the length of y is 11 so the question is how to add different length vectors together and that is resolved by recycling the shorter vector (x) to be the same length as y. The shorter vector is 5 long so we must recycle it to length 11 which is 11/5 = 2.2 as long as x. That is, the last statement in the code above is conceptually the same as any of these:

v <- 2 * c(x, x, x[1]) + y + 1

v <- 2 * x[c(1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 1)] + y + 1

v <- 2 * c(x[1], x[2], x[3], x[4], x[5], x[1], x[2], x[3], x[4], x[5], x[1]) + y + 1

v <- c(2*x[1] + y[1] + 1,
       2*x[2] + y[2] + 1,
       2*x[3] + y[3] + 1,
       2*x[4] + y[4] + 1,
       2*x[5] + y[5] + 1,
       2*x[1] + y[6] + 1, # there is no x[6] so x is recycled to x[1]
       2*x[2] + y[7] + 1,
       2*x[3] + y[8] + 1,
       2*x[4] + y[9] + 1,
       2*x[5] + y[10] + 1,
       2*x[1] + y[11] + 1) # x is recycled to x[1]

v <- numeric( length(y) )
for(i in seq_along(v)) v[i] <- 2 * x[ (i-1) %% length(x) + 1 ] + y[i] + 1
  • Thank you very much for spoon feeding type answer. – rɑːdʒɑ Aug 2 '16 at 15:16

in the chapter 2 in the link there is vector x which is

x <- c(10.4, 5.6, 3.1, 6.4, 21.7)
> x
[1] 10.4  5.6  3.1  6.4 21.7

and y which is

y <- c(x, 0, x)
> y
 [1] 10.4  5.6  3.1  6.4 21.7  0.0 10.4  5.6  3.1  6.4 21.7

Because x has 5 elements and y has 11, x is repeated till 11 elements are reached when you want to do x + y. 11/5 = 2.2 = that often x must be repeated. "1" is just one element and has to be repeated 11 times.

  • Thank you Chitou – rɑːdʒɑ Aug 2 '16 at 15:14
  • StackOverflow deprecates using comments to say "thank you"; if this answer was useful you can upvote it (if you have sufficient reputation), and in any case if it answers your question satisfactorily you are encouraged to click the check-mark to accept it. – Ben Bolker Aug 2 '16 at 15:24

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