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I've been trying to scrape some twitter's data, but when ever I run this code I get the error SyntaxError: Missing parentheses in call to 'print'.

Can someone please help me out with this one?

Thanks for your time :)

"""
Use Twitter API to grab user information from list of organizations; 
export text file
Uses Twython module to access Twitter API
"""

import sys
import string
import simplejson
from twython import Twython

#WE WILL USE THE VARIABLES DAY, MONTH, AND YEAR FOR OUR OUTPUT FILE NAME
import datetime
now = datetime.datetime.now()
day=int(now.day)
month=int(now.month)
year=int(now.year)


#FOR OAUTH AUTHENTICATION -- NEEDED TO ACCESS THE TWITTER API
t = Twython(app_key='APP_KEY', #REPLACE 'APP_KEY' WITH YOUR APP KEY, ETC., IN THE NEXT 4 LINES
    app_secret='APP_SECRET',
    oauth_token='OAUTH_TOKEN',
    oauth_token_secret='OAUTH_TOKEN_SECRET')

#REPLACE WITH YOUR LIST OF TWITTER USER IDS
ids = "4816,9715012,13023422, 13393052,  14226882,  14235041, 14292458, 14335586, 14730894,\
    15029174, 15474846, 15634728, 15689319, 15782399, 15946841, 16116519, 16148677, 16223542,\
    16315120, 16566133, 16686673, 16801671, 41900627, 42645839, 42731742, 44157002, 44988185,\
    48073289, 48827616, 49702654, 50310311, 50361094,"

#ACCESS THE LOOKUP_USER METHOD OF THE TWITTER API -- GRAB INFO ON UP TO 100 IDS WITH EACH API CALL
#THE VARIABLE USERS IS A JSON FILE WITH DATA ON THE 32 TWITTER USERS LISTED ABOVE
users = t.lookup_user(user_id = ids)

#NAME OUR OUTPUT FILE - %i WILL BE REPLACED BY CURRENT MONTH, DAY, AND YEAR
outfn = "twitter_user_data_%i.%i.%i.txt" % (now.month, now.day, now.year)

#NAMES FOR HEADER ROW IN OUTPUT FILE
fields = "id screen_name name created_at url followers_count friends_count statuses_count \
    favourites_count listed_count \
    contributors_enabled description protected location lang expanded_url".split()

#INITIALIZE OUTPUT FILE AND WRITE HEADER ROW
outfp = open(outfn, "w")
outfp.write(string.join(fields, "\t") + "\n")  # header

#THE VARIABLE 'USERS' CONTAINS INFORMATION OF THE 32 TWITTER USER IDS LISTED ABOVE
#THIS BLOCK WILL LOOP OVER EACH OF THESE IDS, CREATE VARIABLES, AND OUTPUT TO FILE
for entry in users:
    #CREATE EMPTY DICTIONARY
    r = {}
    for f in fields:
        r[f] = ""
    #ASSIGN VALUE OF 'ID' FIELD IN JSON TO 'ID' FIELD IN OUR DICTIONARY
    r['id'] = entry['id']
    #SAME WITH 'SCREEN_NAME' HERE, AND FOR REST OF THE VARIABLES
    r['screen_name'] = entry['screen_name']
    r['name'] = entry['name']
    r['created_at'] = entry['created_at']
    r['url'] = entry['url']
    r['followers_count'] = entry['followers_count']
    r['friends_count'] = entry['friends_count']
    r['statuses_count'] = entry['statuses_count']
    r['favourites_count'] = entry['favourites_count']
    r['listed_count'] = entry['listed_count']
    r['contributors_enabled'] = entry['contributors_enabled']
    r['description'] = entry['description']
    r['protected'] = entry['protected']
    r['location'] = entry['location']
    r['lang'] = entry['lang']
    #NOT EVERY ID WILL HAVE A 'URL' KEY, SO CHECK FOR ITS EXISTENCE WITH IF CLAUSE
    if 'url' in entry['entities']:
        r['expanded_url'] = entry['entities']['url']['urls'][0]['expanded_url']
    else:
        r['expanded_url'] = ''
    print r
    #CREATE EMPTY LIST
    lst = []
    #ADD DATA FOR EACH VARIABLE
    for f in fields:
        lst.append(unicode(r[f]).replace("\/", "/"))
    #WRITE ROW WITH DATA IN LIST
    outfp.write(string.join(lst, "\t").encode("utf-8") + "\n")

outfp.close()
  • 3
    You're trying to run Python 2 code in Python 3. – Morgan Thrapp Aug 2 '16 at 15:25
  • 3
    I know this is going to shock you but... your call to print... it is missing parentheses. (print r -> print(r)) – Two-Bit Alchemist Aug 2 '16 at 15:27
  • did you do ANY research? It's in the How to Ask guide and there are several questions on stack overflow. – noɥʇʎԀʎzɐɹƆ Aug 2 '16 at 15:40
  • Please a) use proper spelling and grammar b) wrap your code in code blocks – noɥʇʎԀʎzɐɹƆ Aug 2 '16 at 15:45
3

It seems like you are using python 3.x, however the code you are running here is python 2.x code. Two ways to solve this:

  • Download python 2.x on Python's website and use it to run your script
  • Add parentheses around your print call at the end by replacing print r by print(r) at the end (and keep using python 3)

But today, a growing majority of python programmers are using python 3, and the official python wiki states the following:

Python 2.x is legacy, Python 3.x is the present and future of the language

If I were you, I'd go with the second option and keep using python 3.

1

Looks like you trying to run Python 2 code in Python 3, where print is function and required parentheses:

print(foo)
1

You just need to add pranethesis to your print statmetnt to convert it to a function, like the error says:

print expression -> print(expression)

In Python 2, print is a statement, but in Python 3, print is a function. So you could alternatively just run your code with Python 2. print(expression) is backwards compatible with Python 2.


Also, why are you capitalizing all your comments? It's annoying. Your code also violates PEP 8 in several ways. Get an editor like PyCharm (it's free) that can automatically detect errors like this.

  • You didn't leave a space between # and your comment
  • You didn't leave spaces between = and other tokens
1

Within python 2, print has been a statement, not a function. That means you can use it without parentheses. In python 3, that has changed. It is a function there and you need to use print(foo) instead of print foo.

  • Remarkably, I have always used parentheses. These nonsensical changes never bother me. Then again, I still parenthesize returned values in C. Sometimes, things that work well that aren't modified to keep up with the Joneses work forever--even after the Joneses change their paradigms to keep up with the Smiths. – Bruce David Wilner Aug 2 '16 at 15:58

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