63

I'm running through a WintellectNOW course on ASP.NET Core/Web API/Angular 2. I have the API portion implemented, but for whatever reason, the JSON that is being returned has the variable names being lowercased.

The returned JSON is formatted like...

[
 {"id":1,"name":"Bowler","color":"black","count":1},
 {"id":2,"name":"Fedora","color":"red","count":1},
 {"id":3,"name":"Baseball Cap","color":"blue","count":3}
]

I'm expecting...

[
 {"Id":1,"Name":"Bowler","Color":"black","Count":1},
 {"Id":2,"Name":"Fedora","Color":"red","Count":1},
 {"Id":3,"Name":"Baseball Cap","Color":"blue","Count":3}
]

Based on the C# model of...

namespace HatCollection.Models
{
    public class Hat
    {
        public int Id { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
        public string Color { get; set; }
        public int Count { get; set; }
    }
}

I even went as far as decorating the properties with [DataMember(Name = "Id")] just to make sure and it still didn't matter.

On the off chance, it's relevant the Action and instance variable in the controller...

private static readonly List<Hat> MyHats = new List<Hat>
{
    new Hat {Id = 1, Name = "Bowler", Color = "black", Count = 1 },
    new Hat {Id = 2, Name = "Fedora", Color = "red", Count = 1 },
    new Hat {Id = 3, Name = "Baseball Cap", Color = "blue", Count = 3 }
};

[HttpGet]
public IEnumerable<Hat> Get()
{
    return MyHats;
}

How do I turn off the camelCase functionality, so that ASP.NET Core returns the property names without changing them?

1

10 Answers 10

57

In Asp.Net Core 3.0 some things have changed. For camelCase do nothing that is out of the box. For PascalCase or another set style use.

services.AddMvc(setupAction=> {
            setupAction.EnableEndpointRouting = false;
        }).AddJsonOptions(jsonOptions =>
        {
            jsonOptions.JsonSerializerOptions.PropertyNamingPolicy = null;
        })
        .SetCompatibilityVersion(CompatibilityVersion.Version_3_0);

In Startup.cs ConfigureServices section

3
  • Excellent working solution for .Net Core 3. The PropertyNamingPolicy is camelCase by default and set it to null makes it working like charm. Thanks a lot ;) Nov 8, 2019 at 12:56
  • 1
    Thanks Martijn. Question: For legacy reasons, I need some controllers in my .NET Core 3 API to return camel case and others pascal case. So a mix of both worlds. Is there any way to configure this on a controller level ?
    – tjeuten
    Nov 18, 2019 at 9:05
  • 2
    Yes, in your controller you may use: return new JsonResult(clientDTO, new JsonSerializerOptions { PropertyNamingPolicy = null, // switch off camelcasing by default WriteIndented = true } );
    – ssurba
    Jun 9, 2020 at 13:55
51

For those who needs a solution about a PascalCase within Api Project that has not the Mvc services you should add this after AddControllers services

 // This method gets called by the runtime. Use this method to add services to the container.
        public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
        {
            services.AddControllers().AddJsonOptions(jsonOptions =>
                {
                    jsonOptions.JsonSerializerOptions.PropertyNamingPolicy = null;
                } ;
        }
1
  • 2
    This was indead the answer for me well done in getting this one it had to be the PropetyNamingPolicy this now has the expected result thanks. Dec 22, 2019 at 19:05
41

For Asp.Net Core 3.1 using the NewtonSoft.Json

services.AddControllers()
        .AddNewtonsoftJson(options =>
        {
            options.UseMemberCasing();
        });
2
  • 5
    also requires nuget package Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.NewtonsoftJson to be able to use that option
    – Sumia
    Jul 6, 2020 at 13:14
  • 1
    This is the correct answer for Newtonsoft/.NET Core 5 as well, and worked with services.AddControllersWithViews() in our hybrid environment.
    – Lavamantis
    May 3, 2021 at 18:31
26

In ASP.NET Core <3.0, JSON properties are camelCased by default (per this announcement).

You can disable this by replacing

services.AddMvc();

with

services
    .AddMvc()
    .AddJsonOptions(opt => opt.SerializerSettings.ContractResolver
        = new DefaultContractResolver());

in your Startup.cs file. You'll have to add using Newtonsoft.Json.Serialization; to the top of the file.

With the DefaultContractResolver in place, the property names will be represented verbatim in the JSON output. No need for DataMember attributes.

18

Here is the answer for .net 5 :

https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/web-api/advanced/formatting?view=aspnetcore-5.0

Configure System.Text.Json based formatters Features for the System.Text.Json based formatters can be configured using Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.JsonOptions.JsonSerializerOptions.

The default formatting is camelCase. The following highlighted code sets PascalCase formatting:

C#

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.AddControllers()
            .AddJsonOptions(options => 
               options.JsonSerializerOptions.PropertyNamingPolicy = null);
}
1
  • This worked well and since it's documented on .Net 6 also I went with this solution.
    – RoLYroLLs
    Sep 12, 2022 at 21:14
3

Another solution in Asp.Net.Core 2.2 as following:

services.AddMvc()
.AddJsonOptions(jsonOptions => jsonOptions.UseMemberCasing())
.SetCompatibilityVersion(CompatibilityVersion.Version_2_2);
1
  • 1
    With the technology being upgraded very often, and when people finding for the perfect answers/solutions, a better one, we should allow the SO to mark them somehow. In that perspective, this is the best answer at the moment for .net core web api 2x / 3. The question is not specifically mentioning the .net core fx version so i'd assume the answers should go on top based on the closest match to the current version.
    – Ak777
    May 7, 2020 at 5:31
2

In ASP.Net Core you can use two way:

First way: UseMemberCasing()
In StartUp.cs :

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
      services.AddControllersWithViews().AddNewtonsoftJson(opt =>
            {
                opt.UseMemberCasing();   // <-- add this
            });
}

Second way: ContractResolver
In StartUp.cs :

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
      services.AddControllersWithViews().AddNewtonsoftJson(opt =>
            {
                opt.SerializerSettings.ContractResolver = new DefaultContractResolver();   // <-- add this
            });
}

depends on your project maybe you used AddMvc() or AddControllers() insted of AddControllersWithViews().

If AddNewtonsoftJson not found, you should install Nuget pacage : Microsoft.AspNetCore.Mvc.NewtonsoftJson (link).

1

You have to change the DefaultContractResolver which uses camelCase by default. Just set the NamingStatergy as null.

This should be done in the StartUp.ConfirgureService as follows.

  public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
    {
        services.AddMvc()
            .AddMvcOptions(o => o.OutputFormatters.Add(
                new XmlDataContractSerializerOutputFormatter()));

            .AddJsonOptions(o => {
                if (o.SerializerSettings.ContractResolver != null)
                {
                    var castedResolver = o.SerializerSettings.ContractResolver
                        as DefaultContractResolver;
                    castedResolver.NamingStrategy = null;
                }
            });
    }

Option 2

Use JSonProperty as follows.

public class Hat
{
    [JsonProperty("id")]
    public int Id { get; set; }
    [JsonProperty("name")]
    public string Name { get; set; }
    [JsonProperty("color")]
    public string Color { get; set; }
    [JsonProperty("count")]
    public int Count { get; set; }
}
1

I am using the following solution because

  • a) I prefer using the .Net Core built in System.Text.Json serializer and
  • b) I do not want to rely on the not documented internal behaviour of jsonOptions.JsonSerializerOptions.PropertyNamingPolicy = null;.

.

services.AddControllers()
    .AddJsonOptions(options =>
    {
        options.JsonSerializerOptions.PropertyNamingPolicy = new MyTransparentJsonNamingPolicy();
    });

where:

public class MyTransparentJsonNamingPolicy : JsonNamingPolicy
{
    // You can came up any custom transformation here, so instead just transparently
    // pass through the original C# class property name, it is possible to explicit
    // convert to PascalCase, etc:
    public override string ConvertName(string name)
    {
        return name;
    }
}
2
  • 2
    Can we make this policy a controller specific? or even action method specific?
    – Nour
    Dec 24, 2020 at 11:05
  • @Nour, you probably have your answer by now but here's what I found (based on .Net 6) documented at learn.microsoft.com/en-us/aspnet/core/web-api/advanced/… public IActionResult Get() => new JsonResult( _todoItemStore.GetList(), new JsonSerializerOptions { PropertyNamingPolicy = null });
    – RoLYroLLs
    Sep 12, 2022 at 21:13
0

In .NET 6 I used:

builder.Services.AddControllersWithViews().AddJsonOptions(opt => opt.JsonSerializerOptions.PropertyNamingPolicy = null);

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