I'm trying to limit the frames per second in a loop that is performing intersection checking, using C++ with chrono and thread.

Here is my code:

std::chrono::system_clock::time_point now = std::chrono::system_clock::now();
std::chrono::system_clock::time_point lastFrame = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

while (true)
{
    // Maintain designated frequency of 5 Hz (200 ms per frame)
    now = std::chrono::system_clock::now();
    std::chrono::duration<double, std::milli> delta = now - lastFrame;
    lastFrame = now;

    if (delta.count() < 200.0)
    {
        std::chrono::duration<double, std::milli> delta_ms(200.0 - delta.count());
        auto delta_ms_duration = std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::milliseconds>(delta_ms);
        std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(delta_ms_duration.count()));
    }

    printf("Time: %f \n", delta.count());

    // Perform intersection test

}

The problem I'm having is that every other output of delta is showing miniscule amounts, rather than the ~200 ms / frame I'm aiming for:

Time: 199.253200
Time: 2.067700
Time: 199.420400
Time: 2.408100
Time: 199.494200
Time: 2.306200
Time: 199.586800
Time: 2.253400
Time: 199.864000
Time: 2.156500
Time: 199.293800
Time: 2.075500
Time: 201.787500
Time: 4.426600
Time: 197.304100
Time: 4.530500
Time: 198.457200
Time: 3.482000
Time: 198.365300
Time: 3.415400
Time: 198.467400
Time: 3.595000
Time: 199.730100
Time: 3.373400

Any thoughts as to why this is happening?

  • 3
    Your times seem to be aproximately 200ms, so what's the problem? You can't expect to get anything near exact timings.. you get a little less than 200, then you get a tiny bit more, deal with it - you are not going to ever get exactly 200 every time. – Jesper Juhl Aug 2 '16 at 20:58
  • 2
    I'm not aiming for exact timings, but I don't understand why some loop iterations are 1-4 ms and others are ~200 ms. – Irongrave Aug 2 '16 at 21:00
  • 2
    because sometimes your deltacount < 200 and you still output it – strangeqargo Aug 2 '16 at 21:01
  • 1
    The OS may schedule your program whenever it likes - one reason. You may be doing something silly somewhere, like sleeping for some amount of time.. – Jesper Juhl Aug 2 '16 at 21:04
  • 1
    Assuming that due to precision of all your sleeps last shorter than expected, you first sleep for 198ms, so delta is ~198ms, so sleep for ~2ms, so your delta is ~2ms. – Jarod42 Aug 2 '16 at 21:07
up vote 15 down vote accepted

If you think about how your code works, you'll find out that it works exactly how you wrote it. Delta oscillates because of a logical mistake in the code.

This is what happens:

  • We start with delta == 0.
  • Because the delta is smaller than 200, you code sleeps 200 - delta(0) == 200 ms.
  • Now, the delta itself becomes close to 200 (because you've measured that sleep time as well as an actual work) and you sleep 200 - delta(200) == 0 ms.
  • After that the cycle repeats.

To fix the problem you need to not measure the sleep time.

This is how it can be done:

#include <iostream>
#include <cstdio>
#include <chrono>
#include <thread>

std::chrono::system_clock::time_point a = std::chrono::system_clock::now();
std::chrono::system_clock::time_point b = std::chrono::system_clock::now();

int main()
{
    while (true)
    {
        // Maintain designated frequency of 5 Hz (200 ms per frame)
        a = std::chrono::system_clock::now();
        std::chrono::duration<double, std::milli> work_time = a - b;

        if (work_time.count() < 200.0)
        {
            std::chrono::duration<double, std::milli> delta_ms(200.0 - work_time.count());
            auto delta_ms_duration = std::chrono::duration_cast<std::chrono::milliseconds>(delta_ms);
            std::this_thread::sleep_for(std::chrono::milliseconds(delta_ms_duration.count()));
        }

        b = std::chrono::system_clock::now();
        std::chrono::duration<double, std::milli> sleep_time = b - a;

        // Your code here

        printf("Time: %f \n", (work_time + sleep_time).count());
    }
}

This code gives me a steady sequence of deltas:

Time: 199.057206 
Time: 199.053581 
Time: 199.064718 
Time: 199.053515 
Time: 199.053307 
Time: 199.053415 
Time: 199.053164 
Time: 199.053511 
Time: 199.053280 
Time: 199.053283    
  • Great explanation, I see where I went wrong now. Thank you. – Irongrave Aug 3 '16 at 15:33
  • the conversation inside sleep_fo()r is not requidred , proof : static_assert(std::is_same<decltype(std::chrono::milliseconds()),decltype(delta_ms_duration)>(),""); does not fail , – Hassen Dhia Sep 17 '17 at 0:31

This is much like Galik's answer, but it keeps the syntax of the OP's question and doesn't drop down to the C API. Additionally it creates a custom unit for the frame duration which I believe is important for readability:

#include <chrono>
#include <cstdint>
#include <iostream>
#include <thread>

int
main()
{
    using namespace std;
    using namespace std::chrono;

    using frames = duration<int64_t, ratio<1, 5>>;  // 5Hz
    auto nextFrame = system_clock::now();
    auto lastFrame = nextFrame - frames{1};;

    while (true)
    {
        // Perform intersection test

        this_thread::sleep_until(nextFrame);
        cout << "Time: "  // just for monitoring purposes
             << duration_cast<milliseconds>(system_clock::now() - lastFrame).count()
             << "ms\n";
        lastFrame = nextFrame;
        nextFrame += frames{1};
    }
}

This outputs for me:

Time: 200ms
Time: 205ms
Time: 205ms
Time: 203ms
Time: 205ms
Time: 205ms
Time: 200ms
Time: 200ms
Time: 200ms
...

Key things to note:

  • A concise way to document 5Hz: using frames = duration<int64_t, ratio<1, 5>>;
  • Use of sleep_until instead of sleep_for, which takes care of the unknown of how long it takes to get the real work done.
  • No use of .count() except for I/O, and here's a library to get rid of that.
  • No manual conversion of units (e.g. / 1000).
  • No floating point units, not that there's anything wrong with that.
  • Minimal need to specify or depend upon explicit units.

With the addition of the duration I/O library, here is how the above code would be changed:

#include "chrono_io.h"
#include <chrono>
#include <cstdint>
#include <iostream>
#include <thread>

int
main()
{
    using namespace date;
    using namespace std;
    using namespace std::chrono;

    using frames = duration<int64_t, ratio<1, 5>>;  // 5Hz
    auto nextFrame = system_clock::now();
    auto lastFrame = nextFrame - frames{1};;

    while (true)
    {
        // Perform intersection test

        this_thread::sleep_until(nextFrame);
        // just for monitoring purposes
        cout << "Time: " << system_clock::now() - lastFrame << '\n';
        lastFrame = nextFrame;
        nextFrame += frames{1};
    }
}

The output would differ depending upon platform (depending upon the "native duration" of system_clock). On my platform it looks like this:

Time: 200042µs
Time: 205105µs
Time: 205107µs
Time: 200044µs
Time: 205105µs
Time: 200120µs
Time: 204307µs
Time: 205136µs
Time: 201978µs
...
  • I get compile errors (both with VS 2017 and GCC 7) when I change the ratio to be 30 ot 60 Hz - error C2679: binary '+=': no operator found which takes a right-hand operand of type 'frames' (or there is no acceptable conversion) - any idea why? – onqtam Feb 7 at 17:20
  • 1
    Yes, this is the compiler warning you that you have a truncation error when adding 1/30 of a second (for example) to a system_clock::time_point because system_clock::time_point can't exactly represent 1/30 of a second. But this is easy to fix! Just add frames{0} to system_clock::now() and let auto do its magic: auto nextFrame = system_clock::now() + frames{0};. Now instead of trafficking in system_clock::time_point, you're using a time_point that can exactly represent the sum of frames and system_clock::time_point precision. – Howard Hinnant Feb 7 at 18:55

I usualy do something like this:

#include <chrono>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    using clock = std::chrono::steady_clock;

    auto next_frame = clock::now();

    while(true)
    {
        next_frame += std::chrono::milliseconds(1000 / 5); // 5Hz

        // do stuff
        std::cout << std::time(0) << '\n'; // 5 for each second

        // wait for end of frame
        std::this_thread::sleep_until(next_frame);
    }
}

Output: (five for each second value)

1470173964
1470173964
1470173964
1470173964
1470173964
1470173965
1470173965
1470173965
1470173965
1470173965
1470173966
1470173966
1470173966
1470173966
1470173966
  • 4
    This is my favorite, except that I would define a custom frame unit: using frames = std::chrono::duration<std::int64_t, std::ratio<1, 5>>;, and then do next_from += frames{1};. That keeps manual conversions out of the code. – Howard Hinnant Aug 2 '16 at 22:15

The alternating delta times are arising from a logic problem: you're adding a delay to one frame based on the duration of the frame before (in terms of how the frame durations are reckoned). This means that after a long frame (~200ms) you don't apply a delay and get a short frame (few ms), which then triggers a delay on the next frame giving a long frame, and so on.

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