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I'm creating a game in which players will need to sort objects on the screen into the correct target locations. I'm looking for a way to shuffle the objects so that no object starts in a correct location. So we don't devolve into a mad world of double negatives, I'm going to call the "correct answer" locations "avoid" locations, and "incorrect answer" locations "valid" locations for this sort.

The arrays might look like this:

var sort_items = [
    {"avoid": ["target1", "target2"]},
    {"avoid": ["target1", "target2"]},
    {"avoid": ["target3"]},
    {"avoid": ["target4", "target5"]},
    {"avoid": ["target4", "target5"]},
];

var sort_locations = [
    {"id": "target1"},
    {"id": "target2"},
    {"id": "target3"},
    {"id": "target4"},
    {"id": "target5"},
];

So, for example, the first and second objects in sort_items could be placed on target3, target4, or target5, but not target1 or target2.

I've tried a number of different methods, but all of them have the problem that by the end of the sort the only remaining locations are frequently invalid for the remaining sort_items. For example:

sort_items[0] placed on target3,
sort_items[1] placed on target5,
sort_items[2] placed on target2,
sort_items[3] placed on target1,
Error: sort_items[4] cannot be placed on target4

Even in this example, picking another at random and swapping with it seems like a bad idea because half of the others would also cause an invalid match on a swap.

Is there a good method by which to do this?

6
  • 1
    An interesting technical problem, but as far as actual game play goes would it really matter if some objects start in their correct position? It would certainly be simpler to just do a plain shuffle and leave it at that... With regard to the algorithm you're looking for, should it assume that the input data is valid? (I.e., that sort_items doesn't specify an impossible combination?)
    – nnnnnn
    Aug 2, 2016 at 21:10
  • Interesting indeed. In a real case, how large are your lists?
    – Arnauld
    Aug 2, 2016 at 21:30
  • Are avoided targets always consequent..?
    – Redu
    Aug 2, 2016 at 21:43
  • @nnnnnn It matters because it's an educational game, and pre-solved items defeats the purpose of having the player think about each one as they play. Otherwise you're right, I wouldn't be so worried about it. And yes, the input data is hand-crafted, so it will always be valid. Aug 3, 2016 at 20:05
  • Well I guess my point was that the player doesn't know that those items are pre-solved, do they? Wouldn't they still have to evaluate each one to decide whether to move them? (Of course, I assumed they'd only be told whether the entire puzzle is complete, not when individual pieces are correct.)
    – nnnnnn
    Aug 3, 2016 at 20:07

2 Answers 2

0

If you want to guarantee that each item has equal probabilities to end up at one of the position that it's allowed to occupy, without any bias induced by the items that were processed before it, I'm inclined to think that the only 'easy' way is to start with a completely random list.

Then, you can walk through the list and attempt to swap each invalid item with the first valid one that you encounter after it.

More precisely, the algorithm below is doing it this way:

// initial random list
["target1", "target5", "target2", "target4", "target3"]
// 1st position is invalid -> swap "target1" and "target5"
["target5", "target1", "target2", "target4", "target3"]
// 2nd position is invalid -> swap "target1" and "target2"
["target5", "target2", "target1", "target4", "target3"]
// 2nd position is still invalid -> swap "target2" and "target4"
["target5", "target4", "target1", "target2", "target3"]
// -> valid list

This will not succeed every time. And when it fails, you'll have to restart from scratch.

This is however more fair than trying to fill the slots one by one in a given order, and more efficient than simply shuffling the list until we get a valid one. (In that we try to 'fix' it before rejecting it.)

var sort_items = [
  {"avoid": ["target1", "target2"]},
  {"avoid": ["target1", "target2"]},
  {"avoid": ["target3"]},
  {"avoid": ["target4", "target5"]},
  {"avoid": ["target4", "target5"]}
];
var sort_locations = [
  {"id": "target1"},
  {"id": "target2"},
  {"id": "target3"},
  {"id": "target4"},
  {"id": "target5"}
];

var list = sort_locations.map(function(i) { return i.id; });

while(!list.every(function(item, i) {
  for(var j = i + 1; sort_items[i].avoid.indexOf(item) != -1; j++) {
    if(j == list.length) {
      return false;
    }
    item = list[j];
    list[j] = list[i];
    list[i] = item;
  }
  return true;
})) {
  list.sort(function() { return Math.random() < 0.5 ? -1 : 1; });
}
console.log(list);

EDIT

I did some further tests which suggest that it's still more biased than I was expecting it to be.

For what it's worth, here is a simpler, 100% trial-and-error version. This one is guaranteed to be unbiased.

var sort_items = [
  {"avoid": ["target1", "target2"]},
  {"avoid": ["target1", "target2"]},
  {"avoid": ["target3"]},
  {"avoid": ["target4", "target5"]},
  {"avoid": ["target4", "target5"]}
];

var sort_locations = [
  {"id": "target1"},
  {"id": "target2"},
  {"id": "target3"},
  {"id": "target4"},
  {"id": "target5"}
];

var list = sort_locations.map(function(i) { return i.id; });

while(!list.every(function(item, i) {
  return sort_items[i].avoid.indexOf(item) == -1;
})) {
  list.sort(function() { return Math.random() < 0.5 ? -1 : 1; });
}
console.log(list);

1
  • Thanks! I think your first solution will work perfectly for what I need to do. Aug 3, 2016 at 20:27
0

Here is a solution that generates all possible solutions through recursion, and then picks a random one. In comparison with random trial-and-error solutions, this might give faster results where the number of solutions is very limited compared to the size of the input.

Secondly, this guarantees that every solution gets an equal probability of being picked.

Note that the script requires ES6 support.

function findSolutions(items, locations) {
    // Transform the data structure to a simple array of Sets with allowed location numbers per item number, to avoid costly `indexOf` calls.
    var locNums = locations.map( (o, i) => i); 
    var locs = locations.reduce( (o, loc, i) => Object.assign(o, { [loc.id]: i }) , {});
    var allowed = items.map( item => {
        var allowed = new Set(locNums);
        item.avoid.forEach( loc => allowed.delete(locs[loc]) );
        return allowed;
    });
    // Now find all possible solutions through recursion
    var occupied = new Set();
    var solutions = [];
    var solution = [];
    (function recurse(itemNo) {
        var loc;
        if (itemNo >= allowed.length) {
            solutions.push(solution.slice());
            return;
        }
        for (loc of allowed[itemNo]) {
            if (!occupied.has(loc)) {
                solution.push(locations[loc].id);
                occupied.add(loc);
                recurse(itemNo+1);
                occupied.delete(loc);
                solution.pop();
            }
        }
    })(0);
    return solutions;
}

// Sample data
var sort_items = [
    {"avoid": ["target1", "target2"]},
    {"avoid": ["target1", "target2"]},
    {"avoid": ["target3"]},
    {"avoid": ["target4", "target5"]},
    {"avoid": ["target4", "target5"]},
];

var sort_locations = [
    {"id": "target1"},
    {"id": "target2"},
    {"id": "target3"},
    {"id": "target4"},
    {"id": "target5"},
];

// Get all solutions
var solutions = findSolutions(sort_items, sort_locations);

// Pick random solution from it
var randomSolution = solutions[Math.floor(Math.random() * solutions.length)];

// Output result
console.log(randomSolution);

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