4

I have a function f <- function(x){x}. I want to insert the line x <- 2*x into f such that it ends up as

function(x){
    x <- 2*x
    x
}

I understand that I should be using body(), but I have thus far only figured out how to replace the entire body, which is not practical for my true purposes.

5
  • @ZheyuanLi Li It is not clear to me how I could use edit to do this...
    – BioBroo
    Aug 3, 2016 at 0:52
  • @ZheyuanLi - since there is a `body<-` function, there's probably a way to do this programmatically. Aug 3, 2016 at 0:54
  • @ZheyuanLi, I don't think commands like fix or edit will work for me because I'm trying to insert lines into any function, rather than one specific function.
    – BioBroo
    Aug 3, 2016 at 1:03
  • @TylerRinker, so the trick is that I can modify lines in the body like a list. That helped! I'm not sure what is the proper way to deal with the question now. It was answered in a comment...
    – BioBroo
    Aug 3, 2016 at 1:23

4 Answers 4

5

Here's another way (using magrittr to streamline things)

f <- function(x){x}
f(2)
# [1] 2
# library(magrittr)
body(f) <- body(f) %>% as.list %>% append(quote(x<-2*x), 1) %>% as.call
f(2)
# [1] 4

Or even simply

body(f) %<>% as.list %>% append(quote(x<-2*x), 1) %>% as.call %>% as.expression

but I feel like I may be missing an en even simpler way

You could write a more traditional function without magrittr as well...

funins <- function(f, expr = expression(x<-2*x), after=1) {
    body(f)<-as.call(append(as.list(body(f)), expr, after=after))
    f
}

Which you can use to insert any expression

f <- function(x){x}
g <- funins(f, expression(print("hi"), x<-3*x))
f(2)
# [1] 2
g(2)
# [1] "hi"
# [1] 6
0
3

Here is my comment as an answer. THe if else protects in case it's a single line fuunction:

f <- function(x){x}


fun <- f

bod <- body(fun)
if (trimws(as.character(bod[[1]])) == "{"){
    body(fun)[[2]] <- quote(x <- 2*x)
    if (length(bod) > 1) body(fun)[3:(1+length(bod))] <- bod[-1]
} else {
    body(fun)[[1]] <- as.name('{')
    body(fun)[[2]] <- quote(x <- 2*x)
    body(fun)[[3]] <- bod
}
fun
fun(3)
1
f <- function(x) { x }
bdy <- deparse(body(f))
body(f) <- as.expression(parse(text=paste0(c(bdy[1], "x <- 2*x", bdy[2:3]), collapse="\n")))

Knowing what you're really trying to do wld be gd. Monkey patching functions like this sounds like a bad idea.

6
  • The small task I'm struggling with is to add in a specific line of code, as the first line of code, into an arbitrary function. The reason I'm doing this is that there is no function parMapply for parallel processing, so I've had to alter user-defined functions to make what I have fit parApply, which is cumbersome and promotes bugs. So I'm writing a little wrapper for parApply that requires me to solve the problem I posed.
    – BioBroo
    Aug 3, 2016 at 1:11
  • 1
    I don't suppose parallel::clusterMap does what you want from parMapply, does it? Aug 3, 2016 at 1:28
  • As far as I understand, clusterMap only works on Linux and Mac operating systems. I'm using Windows.
    – BioBroo
    Aug 3, 2016 at 1:49
  • 1
    I think that's only true for the mc* functions which rely on a fork - the par* and cluster* functions derive from snow and work on Windows (IIRC). Aug 3, 2016 at 1:59
  • @JonathanCarroll As it turns out, my understanding is not that far. After doing some more reading, it looks like cluster* functions do not use forking. I didn't find that written explicitly, but it appears so.
    – BioBroo
    Aug 3, 2016 at 12:16
0

Building on hrbrmstr's answer, here is an easy-to-use wrapper, without using external packages.

The function used to patch other functions.

patch.function <- function(fun, patch, position = 1) {
    # Deparse the body.
    fun.body <- deparse(body(fun))

    # Append the patch to function body where intended.
    patched.fun.body <- paste0(
        c(fun.body[1:position], patch, fun.body[(position + 1):length(fun.body)]),
        collapse = "\n"
    )

    # Parse and treat as an expression.
    expr <- as.expression(parse(text = patched.fun.body))

    return(expr)
}

Let's say we want to patch the following dummy function.

dummy.fun <- function() {
    print("- a line A of the function body.")
    print("- a line B of the function body.")
    print("- a line C of the function body.")
    print("- a line D of the function body.")
    print("- a line E of the function body.")
    print("- a line F of the function body.")
    print("- a line G of the function body.")
    print("- a line H of the function body.")
}

We can use it as:

body(dummy.fun) <- patch.function(dummy.fun, "print('Before the A line of the body.')")
dummy.fun()

# Output:
# [1] "Before the A line of the body."
# [1] "- a line A of the function body."
# [1] "- a line B of the function body."
# [1] "- a line C of the function body."
# [1] "- a line D of the function body."
# [1] "- a line E of the function body."
# [1] "- a line F of the function body."
# [1] "- a line G of the function body."
# [1] "- a line H of the function body."


body(dummy.fun) <- patch.function(dummy.fun, "print('Before the D line of the body.')", position = 5)
dummy.fun()

# Output:
# [1] "Before the A line of the body."
# [1] "- a line A of the function body."
# [1] "- a line B of the function body."
# [1] "- a line C of the function body."
# [1] "Before the D line of the body."
# [1] "- a line D of the function body."
# [1] "- a line E of the function body."
# [1] "- a line F of the function body."
# [1] "- a line G of the function body."
# [1] "- a line H of the function body."

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