3

Suppose I have an object

class Obj {
public:
    int a;
    int b;
    int c;
}

And an array of objects

Obj o[N];

I want to copy each Obj.a into an int array and I know other languages allow me to make a function that might look like this in C++

int & fun(Obj os[], T key, int N){
    int a[N];
    for (int i=0; i<N; i++) {
       a[i] = os[i].key;
    }
    return a;
}

Is there any reusable way to do this in C++? For reference, Obj's code can't be modified.

  • 2
    Yes there is! Don't use a C-style array and everything gonna be fine! – mash Aug 3 '16 at 7:13
  • 1
    Returning a by reference is UB. Do you need to be able to edit those members? – LogicStuff Aug 3 '16 at 7:19
  • @mash you probably misread the question (unless it's irony?) – fdreger Aug 3 '16 at 7:21
  • 1
    @mash Even if you use std::vector, that doesn't solve the problem. The question is the same. – melpomene Aug 3 '16 at 7:29
  • @mash I meant the whole stenence :) I had same doubts as Melpomene :) – fdreger Aug 3 '16 at 7:31
7

This is what the std::transform function is for. All you need to provide is a function to get the desired element from an Obj. This example shows how to do it with std::mem_fn:

#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>
#include <iterator>    
#include <iostream>

struct Obj { int a, b, c; };

int main() {

    Obj o[3] = {{1, 2, 3}, {11, 22, 33},{111, 222, 333}};

    int a[3];

    std::transform(std::begin(o), std::end(o),
                   std::begin(a),
                   std::mem_fn(&Obj::a));

    for (auto e : a)
        std::cout << e << ' ';

    std::cout << std::endl;
};

Output:

1 11 111

This can all be wrapped up in a helper function to allow the caller to set the attribute to extract. But note if you really want a function to return an array, you'll need to use a copyable type such as std::array or std::vector. In C++ plain arrays are not copyable so can't be returned by value from a function.

  • 1
    An alternative to [](const Obj& e) { return e.a;} could be std::mem_fn(&Obj::a); which involves fewer keystrokes. – Nawaz Aug 3 '16 at 7:31
  • @Nawaz Yes, thanks. I'm on it! – juanchopanza Aug 3 '16 at 7:31
4

Here's a slightly modified version of your code:

#include <cstddef>
#include <iostream>

using std::size_t;

struct Obj {
    int a;
    int b;
    int c;
};

static void fun(const Obj *os, size_t N, int Obj::*const key) {
    for (size_t i = 0; i < N; i++) {
        std::cout << os[i].*key << '\n';
    }
}

int main() {
    Obj o[] = { {1, 2, 3}, {4, 5, 6} };
    fun(o, sizeof o / sizeof o[0], &Obj::b);
}

I changed the return type of fun because your version doesn't typecheck. For demonstration purposes fun simply outputs the elements.

The key here is that you can abstract over class fields by using member pointers.

  • Thank you so much! – Lightyear Buzz Aug 3 '16 at 7:23
  • You could template the fun function to make it work with various types. – Ionel POP Aug 3 '16 at 7:23
4

You can use pointer-to-member syntax:

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

struct Obj {
    int a;
    int b;
};

std::unique_ptr<int[]>
fn(Obj* os, size_t N, int Obj::*member)
{
    auto arr = std::make_unique<int[]>(N);
    for (size_t i = 0; i < N; ++i) {
        arr[i] = os[i].*member;
    }
    return arr;
}

int main() {
    Obj os[] { { 1, 10 }, { 2, 20 } };

    auto a1 = fn(os, 2, &Obj::a);
    auto a2 = fn(os, 2, &Obj::b);

    for (size_t i = 0; i < 2; ++i) {
        std::cout << i << ": " << a1[i] << ", " << a2[i] << '\n';
    }
}

Demo: http://ideone.com/cQMyh3

Or you could use a lambda.

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

struct Obj {
    int a;
    int b;
};

std::unique_ptr<int[]>
fn(Obj* os, size_t N, std::function<int(const Obj&)> keyFn)
{
    auto arr = std::make_unique<int[]>(N);
    for (size_t i = 0; i < N; ++i) {
        arr[i] = keyFn(os[i]);
    }
    return arr;
}

int main() {
    Obj os[] { { 1, 10 }, { 2, 20 } };

    auto a1 = fn(os, 2, [](const Obj& o){ return o.a; });
    auto a2 = fn(os, 2, [](const Obj& o){ return o.b; });

    for (size_t i = 0; i < 2; ++i) {
        std::cout << i << ": " << a1[i] << ", " << a2[i] << '\n';
    }
}

http://ideone.com/9OvTzl

Or the more generic:

template<typename KeyFn>
std::unique_ptr<int[]>
fn(Obj* os, size_t N, KeyFn keyFn)
{
    auto arr = std::make_unique<int[]>(N);
    for (size_t i = 0; i < N; ++i) {
        arr[i] = keyFn(os[i]);
    }
    return arr;
}

Other changes to consider:

  • Use a standard container, e.g. vector or array to house your Obj's,
  • Consider passing iterators over the ranges rather than a pointer and a size,
  • std::function over template, why? – mash Aug 3 '16 at 7:29
  • 1
    @mash shrug didn't seem to be worth introducing a template for this example. – kfsone Aug 3 '16 at 7:31
  • 1
    @mash see edit. – kfsone Aug 3 '16 at 7:32
  • Template is more appropriate for my use. I just gave a simplified model of the code so that I could get help in a timely manner. Thank you. – Lightyear Buzz Aug 3 '16 at 7:38
  • @LightyearBuzz Are the source arrays a fixed size? If so, you could consider ideone.com/PYzNSo or (returning a std::vector instead of passing in a fixed-sized array) ideone.com/igqqVB – kfsone Aug 3 '16 at 8:34
1

Using range library you may simply do

for (int e : objs | ranges::v3::view::transform(&Obj::a)) {
    std::cout << e << " ";   
}

Demo

1

A possible transcription of your example in C++ could be:

#include <functional>
int* fun(Obj os[], std::function<int(Obj)> get_key, int N){
    int* a = new int[N];
    for (int i=0; i<N; i++) {
        a[i] = get_key(os[i]);
    }
    return a;
}

Use:

func(os, [](Obj obj){return obj.a;}, N);

You must declare a dynamic array because the size is variable. But with a raw pointer, you may obtain memory leak or segmentation fault. A version with managed pointers (only working in C++14):

#include <memory>
#include <functional>

std::unique_ptr<int[]> fun(Obj os[], std::function<int(Obj)> get_key, int N){
    std::unique_ptr<int[]> a = std::make_unique(N);

    for (int i=0; i<N; i++) {
        a[i] = get_key(os[i]);
    }
    return a;
}

Or with stl container (no memory allocation):

#include <vector>
#include <functional>

std::vector<int> fun(Obj os[], std::function<int(Obj)> get_key, int N){
    std::vector<int> a(N);
    for (int i=0; i<N; i++) {
        a[i] = get_key(os[i]);
    }
    return a;
}

But it's often a bad idea to "translate" from one language to another ;)

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