172

Let's say I have an object:

{
  item1: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item2: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item3: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' }
}

I want to create another object by filtering the object above so I have something like.

 {
    item1: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
    item3: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' }
 }

I am looking for a clean way to accomplish this using Es6, so spread operators are available to me. THanks!

  • ES6 has no object spread operators, and you don't need them here anyway – Bergi Aug 3 '16 at 18:32
  • 1
    Possible duplicate of JavaScript: filter() for Objects – Sheljohn Mar 5 '17 at 9:45
  • @Sheljohn: that question is from 2011 and about ES5. – Dan Dascalescu May 12 '17 at 1:02
  • @DanDascalescu But this answer gives an ES6 way of accomplishing what the OP asks, doesn't it? – Sheljohn May 12 '17 at 11:27
  • What if I wanted to filter by a key/value? – jmchauv Apr 3 at 2:15

18 Answers 18

340
+150

If you have a list of allowed values, you can easily retain them in an object using:

const raw = {
  item1: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item2: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item3: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' }
};

const allowed = ['item1', 'item3'];

const filtered = Object.keys(raw)
  .filter(key => allowed.includes(key))
  .reduce((obj, key) => {
    obj[key] = raw[key];
    return obj;
  }, {});

console.log(filtered);

This uses:

  1. Object.keys to list all properties in raw (the original data), then
  2. Array.prototype.filter to select keys that are present in the allowed list, using
    1. Array.prototype.includes to make sure they are present
  3. Array.prototype.reduce to build a new object with only the allowed properties.

This will make a shallow copy with the allowed properties (but won't copy the properties themselves).

You can also use the object spread operator to create a series of objects without mutating them (thanks to rjerue for mentioning this):

const raw = {
  item1: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item2: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item3: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' }
};

const allowed = ['item1', 'item3'];

const filtered = Object.keys(raw)
  .filter(key => allowed.includes(key))
  .reduce((obj, key) => {
    return {
      ...obj,
      [key]: raw[key]
    };
  }, {});

console.log(filtered);

For purposes of trivia, if you wanted to remove the unwanted fields from the original data (which I would not recommend doing, since it involves some ugly mutations), you could invert the includes check like so:

const raw = {
  item1: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item2: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item3: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' }
};

const allowed = ['item1', 'item3'];

Object.keys(raw)
  .filter(key => !allowed.includes(key))
  .forEach(key => delete raw[key]);

console.log(raw);

I'm including this example to show a mutation-based solution, but I don't suggest using it.

  • 1
    Thanks that worked great. I also found an approach by using 'deconstruction syntax. IE : const {item1,item3} = raw const newObject = {item1,item3} – 29er Aug 3 '16 at 18:41
  • 2
    Deconstruction will work (just fine), but is purely compile-time. You can't make it a dynamic list of properties or provide any complex rules (a loop can have validation callbacks attached, for example). – ssube Aug 3 '16 at 18:43
  • 2
    I can't vote this up enough! Well done for using filter and reduce and not constructing another object from a for loop. And awesome that you explicitly separated the immutable and mutable versions. +1 – Sukima Aug 3 '16 at 20:09
  • 3
    Quick warning: Array.prototype.includes is not part of ES6. It's introduced in ECMAScript 2016 (ES7). – Vineet Mar 10 '17 at 2:02
  • 3
    If you want to do the reduce in an immutable way, you could also replace the function contents with return { ...obj, [key]: raw[key] } – rjerue Feb 7 '18 at 18:57
60

If you are OK with using ES6 syntax, I find that the cleanest way to do this, as noted here and here is:

const data = {
  item1: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item2: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item3: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' }
};

const { item2, ...newData } = data;

Now, newData contains:

{
  item1: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item3: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' }
};

Or, if you have the key stored as a string:

const key = 'item2';
const { [key]: _, ...newData } = data;

In the latter case, [key] is converted to item2 but since you are using a const assignment, you need to specify a name for the assignment. _ represents a throw away value.

More generally:

const { item2, ...newData } = data; // Assign item2 to item2
const { item2: someVarName, ...newData } = data; // Assign item2 to someVarName
const { item2: _, ...newData } = data; // Assign item2 to _
const { ['item2']: _, ...newData } = data; // Convert string to key first, ...

Not only does this reduce your operation to a one-liner but it also doesn't require you to know what the other keys are (those that you want to preserve).

  • 4
    " _ represents a throw away value" where does this come? First time I see it – yhabib Sep 22 '17 at 13:19
  • 4
    I believe this is an adopted convention by the JS community. An _ is simply a valid variable name that can be used in JS but since it is pretty much nameless, it really shouldn't be used in that way if you care to convey intent. So, it's been adopted as a way to denote a variable you don't care about. Here's further discussion about it: stackoverflow.com/questions/11406823/… – Ryan H. Sep 22 '17 at 13:29
  • 1
    This is much tidier than the accepted answer, avoids the overhead of creating a new array with Object.keys(), and the overhead of iterating the array with filter and reduce. – ericsoco Dec 16 '17 at 5:46
  • 2
    @yhabib the _ doesn't matter, it's just a variable name, you can rename it to anything you want – Vic Feb 23 '18 at 21:33
  • 1
    @Gerrat I don't think a generalized solution would be a trivial one-liner. For that, I would use lodash's omit function: lodash.com/docs/4.17.10#omit or one of the other solutions given here. – Ryan H. Aug 14 '18 at 19:27
34

The cleanest way you can find is with Lodash#pick

const _ = require('lodash');

const allowed = ['item1', 'item3'];

const obj = {
  item1: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item2: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item3: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' }
}

const filteredObj = _.pick(obj, allowed)
  • It's important to point out that for it an extra project dependency has to be downloaded on runtime. – S. Esteves Jun 6 at 6:13
17

Nothing that hasn't been said before, but to combine some answers to a general ES6 answer:

const raw = {
  item1: { key: 'sdfd', value: 'sdfd' },
  item2: { key: 'sdfd', value: 'sdfd' },
  item3: { key: 'sdfd', value: 'sdfd' }
};

const filteredKeys = ['item1', 'item3'];

const filtered = filteredKeys
  .reduce((obj, key) => ({ ...obj, [key]: raw[key] }), {});

console.log(filtered);

14

Just another solution in one line of code.

I was playing with "Destructuring" feature :

const raw = {
    item1: { key: 'sdfd', value: 'sdfd' },
    item2: { key: 'sdfd', value: 'sdfd' },
    item3: { key: 'sdfd', value: 'sdfd' }
  };
var myNewRaw = (({ item1, item3}) => ({ item1, item3 }))(raw);
console.log(myNewRaw);

  • 2
    var myNewRaw = (({ item1, item3}) => ({ item1, item3 }))(raw); Syntax issue – Awol Mar 30 '18 at 7:09
  • How does this actually work? – Giraldi Feb 5 at 16:37
  • There are a couple of things condensed here: First thing first, there is the declaration of the function. it is an arrow function (it takes an object and return an object) . It is the same thing as function(obj){return obj;}. the second thing is that ES6 allow destructuring future. In my function declaration I destructure my object{ item1, item3}. And the last thing is that I self invoke my function. You can use self invoke function to manage your scope for example. But here it was just to condense the code. I hope it is clear. If I miss something feel free to add more. – Novy Feb 6 at 23:00
  • this is the preferred modern approach imho – mattdlockyer Jul 27 at 15:34
9

You can add a generic ofilter (implemented with generic oreduce) so you can easily filter objects the same way you can arrays –

const oreduce = (f, acc, o) =>
  Object
    .entries (o)
    .reduce
      ( (acc, [ k, v ]) => f (acc, v, k, o)
      , acc
      )

const ofilter = (f, o) =>
  oreduce
    ( (acc, v, k, o)=>
        f (v, k, o)
          ? Object.assign (acc, {[k]: v})
          : acc
    , {}
    , o
    )

We can see it working here -

const data =
  { item1: { key: 'a', value: 1 }
  , item2: { key: 'b', value: 2 }
  , item3: { key: 'c', value: 3 }
  }

console.log
  ( ofilter
      ( (v, k) => k !== 'item2'
      , data
      )
      // [ { item1: { key: 'a', value: 1 } }
      // , { item3: { key: 'c', value: 3 } }
      // ]

  , ofilter
      ( x => x.value === 3
      , data
      )
      // [ { item3: { key: 'c', value: 3 } } ]
  )

Verify the results in your own browser below –

const oreduce = (f, acc, o) =>
  Object
    .entries (o)
    .reduce
      ( (acc, [ k, v ]) => f (acc, v, k, o)
      , acc
      )

const ofilter = (f, o) =>
  oreduce
    ( (acc, v, k, o)=>
        f (v, k, o)
          ? Object.assign (acc, { [k]: v })
          : acc
    , {}
    , o
    )

const data =
  { item1: { key: 'a', value: 1 }
  , item2: { key: 'b', value: 2 }
  , item3: { key: 'c', value: 3 }
  }

console.log
  ( ofilter
      ( (v, k) => k !== 'item2'
      , data
      )
      // [ { item1: { key: 'a', value: 1 } }
      // , { item3: { key: 'c', value: 3 } }
      // ]

  , ofilter
      ( x => x.value === 3
      , data
      )
      // [ { item3: { key: 'c', value: 3 } } ]
  )

These two functions could be implemented in many ways. I chose to attach to Array.prototype.reduce inside oreduce but you could just as easily write it all from scratch

  • I like your solution, but I don't know how much clearer / more efficient it is compared to this one. – Sheljohn Mar 5 '17 at 9:47
  • 3
    Here is a benchmark showing that your solution is the fastest. – Sheljohn Mar 5 '17 at 11:47
  • In oreduce, the first acc is shadowed in .reduce(acc, k), and in ofilter the o is shadowed - oreduce is called with a variable called o as well - which is which? – Jarrod Mosen Sep 27 '17 at 3:27
  • in ofilter the variable o is shadowed but it always points to the the same input var; that’s why its shadowed here, because it’s the same - the accumulator (acc) is also shadowed because it more clearly shows how the data moves thru the lambda; acc is not always the same binding, but it always represents the current persistent state of the computational result we wish to return – user633183 Sep 27 '17 at 16:21
  • While the code works well and the method is very good I do wonder what help writing code like that is to somebody obviously needing help with javascript. I'm all for brevity but that is almost as compact as a minimized code. – Paul G Mihai Nov 5 '18 at 20:33
6

This is how I did it, recently:

const dummyObj = Object.assign({}, obj);
delete dummyObj[key];
const target = Object.assign({}, {...dummyObj});
  • 2
    could replace Object.assign with object spread instead – Vic Feb 23 '18 at 21:31
6

ok, how about this one-liner

    const raw = {
      item1: { key: 'sdfd', value: 'sdfd' },
      item2: { key: 'sdfd', value: 'sdfd' },
      item3: { key: 'sdfd', value: 'sdfd' }
    };

    const filteredKeys = ['item1', 'item3'];

    const filtered = Object.assign({}, ...filteredKeys.map(key=> ({[key]:raw[key]})));
  • 2
    Most amazing solution of all the answers. +1 – Gergő Horváth May 11 at 16:43
4

Piggybacking on ssube's answeranswer.

Here's a reusable version.

Object.filterByKey = function (obj, predicate) {
  return Object.keys(obj)
    .filter(key => predicate(key))
    .reduce((out, key) => {
      out[key] = obj[key];
      return out;
    }, {});
}

To call it use

const raw = {
  item1: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item2: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item3: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' }
};

const allowed = ['item1', 'item3'];

var filtered = Object.filterByKey(raw, key => 
  return allowed.includes(key));
});

console.log(filtered);

The beautiful thing about ES6 arrow functions is that you don't have to pass in allowed as a parameter.

3

The answers here are definitely suitable but they are a bit slow because they require looping through the whitelist for every property in the object. The solution below is much quicker for large datasets because it only loops through the whitelist once:

const data = {
  allowed1: 'blah',
  allowed2: 'blah blah',
  notAllowed: 'woah',
  superSensitiveInfo: 'whooooah',
  allowed3: 'bleh'
};

const whitelist = ['allowed1', 'allowed2', 'allowed3'];

function sanitize(data, whitelist) {
    return whitelist.reduce(
      (result, key) =>
        data[key] !== undefined
          ? Object.assign(result, { [key]: data[key] })
          : result,
      {}
    );
  }

  sanitize(data, whitelist)
  • thanks! this is working for me – subelsky Sep 27 '18 at 18:17
3

You can do something like this:

const base = {
  item1: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item2: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item3: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' }
};

const filtered = (
    source => { 
        with(source){ 
            return {item1, item3} 
        } 
    }
)(base);

// one line
const filtered = (source => { with(source){ return {item1, item3} } })(base);

This works but is not very clear, plus the with statement is not recommended (https://developer.mozilla.org/en-US/docs/Web/JavaScript/Reference/Statements/with).

3

A simpler solution without using filter can be achieved with Object.entries() instead of Object.keys()

const raw = {
  item1: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item2: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item3: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' }
};

const allowed = ['item1', 'item3'];

const filtered = Object.entries(raw).reduce((acc,elm)=>{
  const [k,v] = elm
  if (allowed.includes(k)) {
    acc[k] = v 
  }
  return acc
},{})
2

There are many ways to accomplish this. The accepted answer uses a Keys-Filter-Reduce approach, which is not the most performant.

Instead, using a for...in loop to loop through keys of an object, or looping through the allowed keys, and then composing a new object is ~50% more performanta.

const obj = {
  item1: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item2: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item3: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' }
};

const keys = ['item1', 'item3'];

function keysReduce (obj, keys) {
  return keys.reduce((acc, key) => {
    if(obj[key] !== undefined) {
      acc[key] = obj[key];
    }
    return acc;
  }, {});
};

function forInCompose (obj, keys) {
  const returnObj = {};
  for (const key in obj) {
    if(keys.includes(key)) {
      returnObj[key] = obj[key]
    }
  };
  return returnObj;
};

keysReduce(obj, keys);   // Faster if the list of allowed keys are short
forInCompose(obj, keys); // Faster if the number of object properties are low

a. See jsPerf for the benchmarks of a simple use case. Results will differ based on browsers.

1

You can now make it shorter and simpler by using the Object.fromEntries method (check browser support):

const raw = { item1: { prop:'1' }, item2: { prop:'2' }, item3: { prop:'3' } };

const allowed = ['item1', 'item3'];

const filtered = Object.fromEntries(Object.entries(raw).filter(([key, val])=>allowed.includes(key)));

read more about: Object.fromEntries

0

OK, how about this:

const myData = {
  item1: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item2: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item3: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' }
};

function filteredObject(obj, filter) {
  if(!Array.isArray(filter)) {
   filter = [filter.toString()];
  }
  const newObj = {};
  for(i in obj) {
    if(!filter.includes(i)) {
      newObj[i] = obj[i];
    }
  }
  return newObj;
}

and call it like this:

filteredObject(myData, ['item2']); //{item1: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' }, item3: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' }}
0

This function will filter an object based on a list of keys, its more efficient than the previous answer as it doesn't have to use Array.filter before calling reduce. so its O(n) as opposed to O(n + filtered)

function filterObjectByKeys (object, keys) {
  return Object.keys(object).reduce((accum, key) => {
    if (keys.includes(key)) {
      return { ...accum, [key]: object[key] }
    } else {
      return accum
    }
  }, {})
}
0

During loop, return nothing when certain properties/keys are encountered and continue with the rest:

const loop = product =>
Object.keys(product).map(key => {
    if (key === "_id" || key === "__v") {
        return; 
    }
    return (
        <ul className="list-group">
            <li>
                {product[key]}
                <span>
                    {key}
                </span>
            </li>
        </ul>
    );
});
0

You can remove a spesific key on your object

items={
  item1: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item2: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' },
  item3: { key: 'sdfd', value:'sdfd' }
}

// Example 1
var key = "item2";
delete items[key]; 

// Example 2
delete items["item2"];

// Example 3
delete items.item2;

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.