What does the following exception mean; how can I fix it?

This is the code:

Toast toast = Toast.makeText(mContext, "Something", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT);

This is the exception:

java.lang.RuntimeException: Can't create handler inside thread that has not called Looper.prepare()
     at android.os.Handler.<init>(Handler.java:121)
     at android.widget.Toast.<init>(Toast.java:68)
     at android.widget.Toast.makeText(Toast.java:231)
  • 7
    check this library compile 'com.shamanland:xdroid-toaster:0.0.5', it doesn't require runOnUiThread() or Context variable, all routine is gone! just invoke Toaster.toast(R.string.my_msg); here is the example: github.com/shamanland/xdroid-toaster-example – Oleksii K. Jul 17 '14 at 10:13
  • 72
    What a stupid error message! It could've been as simple as - can't call this from a non-UI thread as done when views are touched from a non-UI thread. – Dheeraj Bhaskar Aug 25 '14 at 15:49
  • 8
    For those who get the same exception message from different code: What the exception message means is that you are calling the code via a thread that has not prepared Looper. Normally it means you are not calling if from UI thread but you should (OP's case) - a normal thread does not prepare Looper, but UI thread always do. – Helin Wang Jul 14 '15 at 18:48
  • @OleksiiKropachov the implementation of the library you mentioned is very similar to doing a runOnUiThread(). – Helin Wang Jul 14 '15 at 19:21
  • 1
    @OleksiiK. this library saved my life, thanks for suggestion – Tarciso Junior Apr 27 at 14:19

19 Answers 19

up vote 562 down vote accepted

You're calling it from a worker thread. You need to call Toast.makeText() (and most other functions dealing with the UI) from within the main thread. You could use a handler, for example.

Look up Communicating with the UI Thread in the documentation. In a nutshell:

// Set this up in the UI thread.

mHandler = new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper()) {
    @Override
    public void handleMessage(Message message) {
        // This is where you do your work in the UI thread.
        // Your worker tells you in the message what to do.
    }
};

void workerThread() {
    // And this is how you call it from the worker thread:
    Message message = mHandler.obtainMessage(command, parameter);
    message.sendToTarget();
}

Other options:

You could use an AsyncTask, that works well for most things running in the background. It has hooks that you can call to indicate the progress, and when it's done.

You could also use Activity.runOnUiThread().

  • 1
    Do you have any basic code of how one could do that? Use a handler from a worker thread? – Eugene van der Merwe Jan 22 '11 at 15:44
  • 221
    Your answer is too ambiguous. Rather than providing a link which contains a lot of unrelated information, it would be much more helpful to provide a direct link to code showing how to use a handler as you propose. Or better yet, include sample code in your answer. – Cleggy Nov 10 '11 at 0:32
  • 4
    Just adding my two cents to what Cleggy said. It would be preferable to provide a brief demonstration of what you mean (however contrived), as a coded example can often speak volumes for itself. – cdata Mar 1 '13 at 22:55
  • 4
    for a full technical answer see this prasanta-paul.blogspot.kr/2013/09/… – tony9099 Sep 26 '13 at 7:50
  • 3
    In almost all programming languages AFAIK which support GUI, if you update/change/display/interact with GUI directly, it should be done on the main thread of the program. – Ahmed Apr 18 '14 at 0:50

You need to call Toast.makeText(...) from the UI thread:

activity.runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
  public void run() {
    Toast.makeText(activity, "Hello", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
  }
});

This is copy-pasted from another (duplicate) SO answer.

  • 11
    Great answer. This had me confused for a while. Just to note, I did not need the activity. before runOnUiThread. – Cen92 May 11 '14 at 12:24

UPDATE - 2016

The best alternative is to use RxAndroid (specific bindings for RxJava) for the P in MVP to take charge fo data.

Start by returning Observable from your existing method.

private Observable<PojoObject> getObservableItems() {
    return Observable.create(subscriber -> {

        for (PojoObject pojoObject: pojoObjects) {
            subscriber.onNext(pojoObject);
        }
        subscriber.onCompleted();
    });
}

Use this Observable like this -

getObservableItems().
subscribeOn(Schedulers.io()).
observeOn(AndroidSchedulers.mainThread()).
subscribe(new Observer<PojoObject> () {
    @Override
    public void onCompleted() {
        // Print Toast on completion
    }

    @Override
    public void onError(Throwable e) {}

    @Override
    public void onNext(PojoObject pojoObject) {
        // Show Progress
    }
});
}

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

I know I am a little late but here goes. Android basically works on two thread types namely UI thread and background thread. According to android documentation -

Do not access the Android UI toolkit from outside the UI thread to fix this problem, Android offers several ways to access the UI thread from other threads. Here is a list of methods that can help:

Activity.runOnUiThread(Runnable)  
View.post(Runnable)  
View.postDelayed(Runnable, long)

Now there are various methods to solve this problem.

I will explain it by code sample:

runOnUiThread

new Thread()
{
    public void run()
    {
        myactivity.this.runOnUiThread(new Runnable()
        {
            public void run()
            {
                //Do your UI operations like dialog opening or Toast here
            }
        });
    }
}.start();

LOOPER

Class used to run a message loop for a thread. Threads by default do not have a message loop associated with them; to create one, call prepare() in the thread that is to run the loop, and then loop() to have it process messages until the loop is stopped.

class LooperThread extends Thread {
    public Handler mHandler;

    public void run() {
        Looper.prepare();

        mHandler = new Handler() {
            public void handleMessage(Message msg) {
                // process incoming messages here
            }
        };

        Looper.loop();
    }
}

AsyncTask

AsyncTask allows you to perform asynchronous work on your user interface. It performs the blocking operations in a worker thread and then publishes the results on the UI thread, without requiring you to handle threads and/or handlers yourself.

public void onClick(View v) {
    new CustomTask().execute((Void[])null);
}


private class CustomTask extends AsyncTask<Void, Void, Void> {

    protected Void doInBackground(Void... param) {
        //Do some work
        return null;
    }

    protected void onPostExecute(Void param) {
        //Print Toast or open dialog
    }
}

Handler

A Handler allows you to send and process Message and Runnable objects associated with a thread's MessageQueue.

Message msg = new Message();


new Thread()
{
    public void run()
    {
        msg.arg1=1;
        handler.sendMessage(msg);
    }
}.start();



Handler handler = new Handler(new Handler.Callback() {

    @Override
    public boolean handleMessage(Message msg) {
        if(msg.arg1==1)
        {
            //Print Toast or open dialog        
        }
        return false;
    }
});
  • 7
    This is exactly what I was looking for. Especially the first example with runOnUiThread – Navin Nov 3 '13 at 2:19
  • 4
    Thanks, 5 years of Android programming and I never knew View also has methods post(Runnable) and postDelayed(Runnable, long)! So many Handlers in vain. :) – Fenix Voltres Apr 15 '15 at 9:13
  • for those who are confused by the Handler example: what is the thread that "new Handler(callback)" is bind to? It's bound to the thread that created the handler. – Helin Wang Jul 14 '15 at 18:44
  • Why is this the best alternative? – Igor Ganapolsky Feb 2 '17 at 22:50
  • I usw doInBackground and I want to get a ArrayList back but I always get the error: Can't create handler inside thread that has not called Looper.prepare(). See this is my question stackoverflow.com/questions/45562615/… but I can't get the solution from this answer here – WeSt Aug 8 '17 at 8:59

Try this, when you see runtimeException due to Looper not prepared before handler.

Handler handler = new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper()); 

handler.postDelayed(new Runnable() {
  @override
  void run() {
  // Run your task here
  }
}, 1000 );
  • Handler is an abstract classs. this doesn't compile – Stealth Rabbi Dec 11 '14 at 18:37
  • 1
    @StealthRabbi import Handler from correct namespace i.e. android.os.Handler – NightFury Feb 17 '15 at 7:58
  • This may not be the issue. A looper may not exist from the calling class, period. – Igor Ganapolsky Feb 2 '17 at 22:51

I ran into the same problem, and here is how I fixed it:

private final class UIHandler extends Handler
{
    public static final int DISPLAY_UI_TOAST = 0;
    public static final int DISPLAY_UI_DIALOG = 1;

    public UIHandler(Looper looper)
    {
        super(looper);
    }

    @Override
    public void handleMessage(Message msg)
    {
        switch(msg.what)
        {
        case UIHandler.DISPLAY_UI_TOAST:
        {
            Context context = getApplicationContext();
            Toast t = Toast.makeText(context, (String)msg.obj, Toast.LENGTH_LONG);
            t.show();
        }
        case UIHandler.DISPLAY_UI_DIALOG:
            //TBD
        default:
            break;
        }
    }
}

protected void handleUIRequest(String message)
{
    Message msg = uiHandler.obtainMessage(UIHandler.DISPLAY_UI_TOAST);
    msg.obj = message;
    uiHandler.sendMessage(msg);
}

To create the UIHandler, you'll need to perform the following:

    HandlerThread uiThread = new HandlerThread("UIHandler");
    uiThread.start();
    uiHandler = new UIHandler((HandlerThread) uiThread.getLooper());

Hope this helps.

  • i tried to use your code but i lost and not sure how to call from onCreate method or from AsyncTask in my situation will you please post the entire code just to learn how things work? – Nick Kahn Feb 29 '12 at 3:41
  • 2
    Shouldn't that final line read uiHandler = new UIHandler(uiThread.getLooper()); ? – Beer Me Sep 9 '13 at 16:42
  • 4
    +1 for code that uses "super looper" – Shaun Neal Sep 30 '13 at 0:55

Toast.makeText() should be called from Main/UI thread. Looper.getMainLooper() helps you to achieve it:

new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper()).post(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        Toast toast = Toast.makeText(mContext, "Something", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT);
    }
});

An advantage of this method is that you can use it in non-Activity (or without Context) classes as well.

  • 1
    Thanks the other answers werent working for me. I am using a library sugar record to manage the persistence. And inside it i dont have the activity. But this works wonderfully – cabaji99 Oct 2 '17 at 20:38

Reason for an error:

Worker threads are meant for doing background tasks and you can't show anything on UI within a worker thread unless you call method like runOnUiThread. If you try to show anything on UI thread without calling runOnUiThread, there will be a java.lang.RuntimeException.

So, if you are in an activity but calling Toast.makeText() from worker thread, do this:

runOnUiThread(new Runnable() 
{
   public void run() 
   {
      Toast toast = Toast.makeText(getApplicationContext(), "Something", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();    
   }
}); 

The above code ensures that you are showing the Toast message in a UI thread since you are calling it inside runOnUiThread method. So no more java.lang.RuntimeException.

I was getting this error until I did the following.

public void somethingHappened(final Context context)
{
    Handler handler = new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper());
    handler.post(
        new Runnable()
        {
            @Override
            public void run()
            {
                Toast.makeText(context, "Something happened.", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
            }
        }
    );
}

And made this into a singleton class:

public enum Toaster {
    INSTANCE;

    private final Handler handler = new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper());

    public void postMessage(final String message) {
        handler.post(
            new Runnable() {
                @Override
                public void run() {
                    Toast.makeText(ApplicationHolder.INSTANCE.getCustomApplication(), message, Toast.LENGTH_SHORT)
                        .show();
                }
            }
        );
    }

}
  • Where are you using Toaster? In your first snippet it isn't used... – Igor Ganapolsky Feb 2 '17 at 23:05
  • 1
    it was a convenience class I used like Toaster.INSTANCE.postMessage(ResourceUtils.getString(R.string.blah)); (lengthy I know! we reduced this later), although I haven't been using toasts in a while – EpicPandaForce Feb 2 '17 at 23:12
  • So what does ApplicationHolder.INSTANCE evaluate to? – Igor Ganapolsky Feb 3 '17 at 14:23
  • A static variable of CustomApplication set in CustomApplication.onCreate(), considering application always exists while the process exists, this context can be used globally – EpicPandaForce Feb 3 '17 at 14:23

that's what i did.

new Handler(Looper.getMainLooper()).post(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        Toast(...);
    }
});

Visual components are "locked" to changes from outside threads. So, since the toast shows stuff on the main screen that is managed by the main thread, you need to run this code on that thread. Hope that helps:)

This is because Toast.makeText() is calling from a worker thread. It should be call from main UI thread like this

runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
      public void run() {
        Toast toast = Toast.makeText(mContext, "Something", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT);
      }
 });
  • Please elaborate your answer. – Robert May 15 '16 at 13:14
  • Can you edit your proposed answer to expand on what this does and how it addresses the OP? – Ro Yo Mi May 16 '16 at 1:07

The answer by ChicoBird worked for me. The only change I made was in the creation of the UIHandler where I had to do

HandlerThread uiThread = new HandlerThread("UIHandler");

Eclipse refused to accept anything else. Makes sense I suppose.

Also the uiHandler is clearly a class global defined somewhere. I still don't claim to understand how Android is doing this and what is going on but I am glad it works. Now I will proceed to study it and see if I can understand what Android is doing and why one has to go through all these hoops and loops. Thanks for the help ChicoBird.

I was running into the same issue when my callbacks would try to show a dialog.

I solved it with dedicated methods in the Activity - at the Activity instance member level - that use runOnUiThread(..)

public void showAuthProgressDialog() {
    runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            mAuthProgressDialog = DialogUtil.getVisibleProgressDialog(SignInActivity.this, "Loading ...");
        }
    });
}

public void dismissAuthProgressDialog() {
    runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
        @Override
        public void run() {
            if (mAuthProgressDialog == null || ! mAuthProgressDialog.isShowing()) {
                return;
            }
            mAuthProgressDialog.dismiss();
        }
    });
}

For Rxjava and RxAndroid User:

public static void shortToast(String msg) {
    Observable.just(msg)
            .observeOn(AndroidSchedulers.mainThread())
            .subscribe(message -> {
                Toast.makeText(App.getInstance(), message, Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
            });
}
  • Those brackets are unnecessary – Borja Oct 23 '17 at 19:47

To display a dialog or a toaster in a thread, the most concise way is to use the Activity object.

For example:

new Thread(new Runnable() {
    @Override
    public void run() {
        myActivity.runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                myActivity.this.processingWaitDialog = new ProgressDialog(myActivity.this.getContext());
                myActivity.this.processingWaitDialog.setProgressStyle(ProgressDialog.STYLE_SPINNER);
                myActivity.this.processingWaitDialog.setMessage("abc");
                myActivity.this.processingWaitDialog.setIndeterminate(true);
                myActivity.this.processingWaitDialog.show();
            }
        });
        expenseClassify.serverPost(
                new AsyncOperationCallback() {
                    public void operationCompleted(Object sender) {
                        myActivity.runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
                            public void run() {
                                if (myActivity.this.processingWaitDialog != null 
                                        && myActivity.this.processingWaitDialog.isShowing()) {
                                    myActivity.this.processingWaitDialog.dismiss();
                                    myActivity.this.processingWaitDialog = null;
                                }
                            }
                        }); // .runOnUiThread(new Runnable()
...
 runOnUiThread(new Runnable() {
            public void run() {
                Toast.makeText(mContext, "Message", Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
            }
        });

Toast, AlertDialogs needs to run on UI thread, you can use Asynctask to use them properly in android development.but some cases we need to customize the time outs, so we use Threads, but in threads we cannot use Toast,Alertdialogs like we using in AsyncTask.So we need separate Handler for popup those.

public void onSigned() {
    Thread thread = new Thread(){
        @Override
        public void run() {
            try{
                sleep(3000);
                Message message = new Message();
                message.what = 2;
                handler.sendMessage(message);
            } catch (Exception e){
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    };
    thread.start();
}

in Above example i want to sleep my thread in 3sec and after i want to show a Toast message,for that in your mainthread implement handler.

handler = new Handler() {
       public void handleMessage(Message msg) {
           switch(msg.what){
              case 1:
              Toast.makeText(getActivity(),"cool",Toast.LENGTH_SHORT).show();
              break;
           }
           super.handleMessage(msg);
       }
};

I used switch case here, because if you need to show different message in same way, you can use switch case within Handler class...hope this will help you

This usually happens when something on the main thread is called from any background thread. Lets look at an example , for instance.

private class MyTask extends AsyncTask<Void, Void, Void> {


@Override
protected Void doInBackground(Void... voids) {
        textView.setText("Any Text");
        return null;
    }
}

In the above example , we are setting text on the textview which is in the main UI thread from doInBackground() method , which operates only on a worker thread.

First need to import given line.

import android.os.StrictMode;

And then, add below lines in onCreate() method of your Activity:

StrictMode.ThreadPolicy policy = new StrictMode.ThreadPolicy.Builder().permitAll().build();
StrictMode.setThreadPolicy(policy);

i use the following code to show message from non main thread "context",

@FunctionalInterface
public interface IShowMessage {
    Context getContext();

    default void showMessage(String message) {
        final Thread mThread = new Thread() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                try {
                    Looper.prepare();
                    Toast.makeText(getContext(), message, Toast.LENGTH_LONG).show();
                    Looper.loop();
                } catch (Exception error) {
                    error.printStackTrace();
                    Log.e("IShowMessage", error.getMessage());
                }
            }
        };
        mThread.start();
    }
}

then use as the following:

class myClass implements IShowMessage{

  showMessage("your message!");
 @Override
    public Context getContext() {
        return getApplicationContext();
    }
}

protected by Community Jun 20 '14 at 22:55

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