21

I've observed that in the following code:

setTimeout(function(){console.log('setTimeout')});
Promise.resolve(1).then(function(){console.log('promise resolve')})

No matter how many times I execute this, the promise callback always logs before the setTimeout.

My understanding is that both callbacks are scheduled to be executed to the next tick, and I don't really understand what is going on that makes the promise always take precendence over the timeout.

13

Short answer Promises have better priority than setTimeout callback function in event loop stack(or how i understand it).

Long answer watch this video. Very helpful. Hope this helps.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8aGhZQkoFbQ

Thanks @MickJuice for new and updated video for event loop.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cCOL7MC4Pl0

22

Promise.resolve schedule a microtask and the setTimeout schedule a macrotask. And the microtasks are executed before running the next macrotask.

13

setTimeout() has a minimum delay of 4ms, so even though you didn't specify a delay in your code the timeout will still be delayed at least 4ms. Your promise's .then() is called in the meantime.

  • 3
    Even if there was no 4ms throttling optimization, promises will be faster anyway. Because setTimeout creates task and Promise creates microtask (job). That's real reason. – artin Oct 10 '17 at 17:11
  • 1
    Well... OK, but in practice the 4ms minimum does apply so for examples like in the question the macro versus micro task priory doesn't enter into it. If we're going to imagine different behaviour than what is actually implemented then even if promises had a lower priority than timeouts the promise in the example would still log first because of the 4ms minimum timeout. Still, back in the real world it is useful to know that the micro task concept exists in JS so thanks for mentioning it. – nnnnnn Oct 10 '17 at 23:36
  • meantime ... to be more precise: at the next tick – Jonas Wilms Mar 26 '18 at 15:51
2

Timeouts and Promises serve different purposes.

setTimeout delays the execution of the code block by a specific time duration. Promises are an interface to allow async execution of code.

A promise allows code to continue executing while you wait for another action to complete. Usually this is a network call. So anything in your then() call will be executed once the network call (or whatever the promise is waiting for) is completed. The time difference between the start of the promise and the resolution of the promise entirely depends on what the promise is executing, and can change with every execution.

The reason the promise is executing before your timeout is that the promise isn't actually waiting for anything so it resolved right away.

  • 3
    By that logic, in this code: Promise.resolve(2).then(function(){console.log('promise resolve 2')}); console.log('Immediate') "promise resolve 2" would be logged before "immediate" right? but it doesnt – frankies Aug 3 '16 at 20:07
  • 5
    @frankies That has more to do with the way Promises are queued and resolved. The focus of my answer is the difference between setTimeout and Promise. – jfadich Aug 3 '16 at 20:11
1

Timeouts and Promises both serve to execute code in an asynchronous way but with differences characteristics and purposes:

setTimeout - Delays the execution of a function by specific time duration. - Does not block the rest of the code execution (asynchronous behavior) - They create Macrotask (browser internal operation)

Promises - They are a wrapper to allow asynchronous execution of code(Eg: an ajax call). (Does not depend on specific time duration) - They are especially useful for changing differents async calls. - Does not block the rest of the code execution (asynchronous behavior) at less you are using the await operator. - They create Microtask (browser internal operation), which have priority over the Macrotask.

Recommendation

  • Use setTimeout when you want to delay a function execution some specific time duration and not block the rest of the code execution in the process

  • Use Promises: When you want to execute some async code and to avoid the “callback hell” (yes because you can make asynchronous ajax calls without Promises but the syntax is less clear and more prone to errors)

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