10

I have following code where I'm getting error while compiling in C# visual Studio 2015.

class Oval:Shape
{
    private double major_axis, minor_axis;
    public Oval(double Major_Axis, double Minor_Axis)
    {
      major_axis = Major_Axis;
      minor_axis = Minor_Axis;
    } //Constructor
}
class Circle:Oval
{
    private double radius;
    public Circle(double Circle_Radius) // Getting Error on this line
    {
      radius = Circle_Radius;  
    } //constructor
}
3
  • 6
    As an aside, now would be a good time to start learning about .NET naming conventions. – Jon Skeet Aug 4 '16 at 5:05
  • But it's easier for everyone to read if you do follow the naming conventions. Why do you think conventions are useful for your real code but not in sample code? – Jon Skeet Aug 5 '16 at 4:40
  • In the latest update I have followed all of the conventions. Thanks . – Dhiraj Sardal Aug 5 '16 at 4:45
18

Fixing your bug:

The error occurs due to the lack of a parameterless constructor (or your lack of using the base() method in your constructor (just like user3185569 had said)

Fixing your code:

It clearly seems you are lacking some basics in .NET so I've decided to give a re-writing to your code with the following things in mind:

a. Conventions

There are some rules about common conventions that should apply to your code.

Members usually begin with either m or _ and then the memberName (camel casing).

Properties are usually written regularly as PropertyName and same applies to methods.

Parameters and variables are simply camel cased like parameterName

b. Access Modifiers

I don't know the use of your Oval and circle but I assume you'd want to access them outside of Oval and Circle.

I think it would be the best to reference you to here to read some more about the topic: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms173121.aspx

I've re-written your code to include all those tips (and also fix your issue)

public class Oval:Shape
{       
    //Constructor
    public Oval(double majorAxis, double minorAxis)
    {
        MajorAxis=majorAxis;
        MinorAxis=minorAxis;
    } 
    
    protected double MajorAxis{ get; set; }     
    protected double MinorAxis{ get; set; }     
}    

public class Circle:Oval
{       
    //Constructor
    public Circle(double radius): base(radius,radius)
    {
        radius = Circle_Radius;  
    }
    
    public double Radius
    {
        get
        {
            return MajorAxis;
        }
        set
        {
            MajorAxis = value;
            MinorAxis = value;
        }       
    }
}
13

Since Circle inherits from Oval, when you create a Circle the default constructor for Oval is called in your case. Since that constructor accepts 2 parameters, you need to explicitly call the constructor and provide them:

class Circle : Oval
{
    private double radius;
    public Circle(double Circle_Radius) : base(0, 0) // change to whatever values
    {
      radius = Circle_Radius;  
    }
}

So A Circle is an Oval, so it has major_axis and minor_axis values. You just didn't provide them as they are required values to create an Oval.

Of course you can add a default public constructor for Oval with no parameters, but that makes you create a Oval with no major_axis and minor_axis and both seems required by the only constructor in the current status of your code. So, you need to rethink how to design your classes.

3
  • If in case, you don't want to provide the values to the constructor of Class Oval , then you can define a parameterless constructor in the Oval Class. public Oval() { major_axis = 0; minor_axis = 0; } – Richa Garg Aug 4 '16 at 5:06
  • 2
    @RichaGarg I hesitated in stating that myself because this way you are able to create an Oval with no major and minor axis. Which doesn't seem the case the OP wanted. This raised questions about designing for inheritance, but things are just not that clear for me. – Zein Makki Aug 4 '16 at 5:09
  • 1
    yes you are right! Everything depends on design. However, by this approach, we can define some default values to major and minor axis. – Richa Garg Aug 4 '16 at 5:12
1

You need to update your base class constructor to the following:

class Oval:Shape
{
    private double major_axis, minor_axis;
    public Oval(double Major_Axis, double Minor_Axis)
    {
      major_axis = Major_Axis;
      minor_axis = Minor_Axis;
    } //Constructor
}
class Circle:Oval
{
    private double radius;
    public Circle(double Circle_Radius):base(12.2,12.2) // pass value to base class constructor
    {
      radius = Circle_Radius;  
    } //constructor
}~```
-2
class Oval : Shape   
{        
    #region Constants
    private const double dblPIE = 3.14d;
    #endregion

    #region Member_Variables
    private double m_dblMajorRad = 0.0d;
    private double m_dblMinorRad = 0.0d;
    #endregion


    #region Constructors
    /// <summary>
    /// default constructor
    /// </summary>
    public Oval()
    {

    }
    /// <summary>
    /// initializes Major Radius and Minor Radius of oval
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="dblOvalMajorRad"></param>
    /// <param name="dblOvalMinorRad"></param>
    public Oval(double dblOvalMajorRad, double dblOvalMinorRad)
    {
        m_dblMajorRad = dblOvalMajorRad;
        m_dblMinorRad = dblOvalMinorRad;
    }
    #endregion
}

class Circle : Oval
{
    #region Constants
    private const double dblPIE = 3.14d;
    #endregion

    #region Member_Variables
    private double m_dblRadius = 0.0d;
    #endregion

    #region Constructors
    /// <summary>
    /// initializes radius
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="dblRadius"></param>
    public Circle(double dblRadius)
    {
        m_dblRadius = dblRadius;
    }
    #endregion
}
2
  • 3
    Posting code only as an answer is not a good practice on StackOverflow. My answer directs you toward the real problem, so I find no reason for you to revert it back as not accepted. Also, the solution your provided is stated in the comments of my answer and also it is stated why it is not a good option. – Zein Makki Aug 5 '16 at 5:09
  • @Dhiraj-sardal You need to state in words describing the code you have modified. – Ron Zhang Jan 24 '20 at 2:47

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