I want to do:

$("img").bind('load', function() {
  // do stuff
});

But the load event doesn't fire when the image is loaded from cache. The jQuery docs suggest a plugin to fix this, but it doesn't work

  • 11
    Since your question things have changed. The broken plugin was moved to a gist and later to a repo with a small working plugin jQuery.imagesLoaded. They fix all the little browser quirks. – Lode Nov 10 '11 at 12:28
  • Above mentioned JQuery library worked just fine for me. Thanks! – plang Dec 10 '12 at 10:42
  • Thank you for the plugin, it worked fine. – onimojo Dec 20 '12 at 18:01

14 Answers 14

up vote 534 down vote accepted

If the src is already set, then the event is firing in the cached case, before you even get the event handler bound. To fix this, you can loop through checking and triggering the event based off .complete, like this:

$("img").one("load", function() {
  // do stuff
}).each(function() {
  if(this.complete) {
      $(this).load(); // For jQuery < 3.0 
      // $(this).trigger('load'); // For jQuery >= 3.0 
  }
});

Note the change from .bind() to .one() so the event handler doesn't run twice.

  • 6
    Your solution worked perfect for me but I want to understand something, when this code "if(this.complete)" will run, after the image content loads or before? because as I can understand from this .each that you are looping on all $("img") and may be the image content is empty and the load will not happen. hmmmm, I think I have something missing, it will be nice if you can describe that is going on to understand it better. thanks. – Amr Elgarhy May 18 '11 at 0:23
  • 31
    Since your answer things have changed. There now is a small working plugin jQuery.imagesLoaded. They fix all the little browser quirks. – Lode Nov 10 '11 at 12:30
  • 2
    I would add a setTimeout(function(){//do stuff},0) within the 'load' function ... the 0 gives the browser system (DOM) one extra tick to ensure that everything is properly updated. – dsdsdsdsd Jul 13 '13 at 10:29
  • 13
    @Lode - it's a HUGE plugin, not small at all by any scale!! – vsync May 5 '14 at 17:36
  • 4
    since JQuery 3 method .load() does not trigger event and has 1 required argument, use .trigger("load") instead – ForceUser Feb 7 at 15:59

Can I suggest that you reload it into a non-DOM image object? If it's cached, this will take no time at all, and the onload will still fire. If it isn't cached, it will fire the onload when the image is loaded, which should be the same time as the DOM version of the image finishes loading.

Javascript:

$(document).ready(function() {
    var tmpImg = new Image() ;
    tmpImg.src = $('#img').attr('src') ;
    tmpImg.onload = function() {
        // Run onload code.
    } ;
}) ;

Updated (to handle multiple images and with correctly ordered onload attachment):

$(document).ready(function() {
    var imageLoaded = function() {
        // Run onload code.
    }
    $('#img').each(function() {
        var tmpImg = new Image() ;
        tmpImg.onload = imageLoaded ;
        tmpImg.src = $(this).attr('src') ;
    }) ;
}) ;
  • 1
    You should try to attach the load handler before it's added, also this won't work but for one image, the OPs code works for many :) – Nick Craver Oct 6 '10 at 21:37
  • Thanks, I have added an updated version which I hope addresses these two issues. – Gus Oct 6 '10 at 21:56
  • #img is an ID not an element selector :) Also this.src works, no need to use jQuery where it isn't needed :) But creating another image seems like overkill in either case IMO. – Nick Craver Oct 6 '10 at 21:57
  • 8
    $('#img').each(? Something very wrong there – Popnoodles Aug 26 '14 at 14:31
  • it should be $('img') . but solution is gr8 in 2k15 also – Dimag Kharab Feb 22 '15 at 5:47

My simple solution, it doesn't need any external plugin and for common cases should be enough:

/**
 * Trigger a callback when the selected images are loaded:
 * @param {String} selector
 * @param {Function} callback
  */
var onImgLoad = function(selector, callback){
    $(selector).each(function(){
        if (this.complete || /*for IE 10-*/ $(this).height() > 0) {
            callback.apply(this);
        }
        else {
            $(this).on('load', function(){
                callback.apply(this);
            });
        }
    });
};

use it like this:

onImgLoad('img', function(){
    // do stuff
});

for example, to fade in your images on load you can do:

$('img').hide();
onImgLoad('img', function(){
    $(this).fadeIn(700);
});

Or as alternative, if you prefer a jquery plugin-like approach:

/**
 * Trigger a callback when 'this' image is loaded:
 * @param {Function} callback
 */
(function($){
    $.fn.imgLoad = function(callback) {
        return this.each(function() {
            if (callback) {
                if (this.complete || /*for IE 10-*/ $(this).height() > 0) {
                    callback.apply(this);
                }
                else {
                    $(this).on('load', function(){
                        callback.apply(this);
                    });
                }
            }
        });
    };
})(jQuery);

and use it in this way:

$('img').imgLoad(function(){
    // do stuff
});

for example:

$('img').hide().imgLoad(function(){
    $(this).fadeIn(700);
});
  • urm.. and what if my images have a size set with css? – Simon_Weaver Sep 27 '14 at 21:49
  • Set width, max-height and leave height:auto, often it's necessary to set both width and height only if you need to stretch the image; for a more robust solution I would use a plugin like ImagesLoaded – guari Aug 11 '15 at 21:21
  • Am I right that wrapping selector in $() - i.e., $(selector).each(...) - is redundant, given that you already have called the function with a jQuery object - onImgLoad($('img'),...)? – Dan Nissenbaum May 18 '16 at 3:38
  • 1
    yes it was a mistyping, jsdoc was ok, I corrected the line example – guari May 20 '16 at 11:12
  • 1
    This does have a (small) race condition. The image can be loading in a different thread to the script and so can load between the check of complete and attaching the onload event, in which case nothing will happen. Normally JS is synchronous with the rendering and so you don't have to worry about race conditions but this is an exception. html.spec.whatwg.org/multipage/… – Mog0 Sep 10 at 15:17

Do you really have to do it with jQuery? You can attach the onload event directly to your image as well;

<img src="/path/to/image.jpg" onload="doStuff(this);" />

It will fire every time the image has loaded, from cache or not.

  • 5
    It is cleaner without inline javascript – hazelnut Dec 8 '13 at 23:24
  • Hi, Bjorn, will the onload handler fire when the image is loaded a second time from cache? – SexyBeast Jun 22 '14 at 11:54
  • @Cupidvogel no it won't. – Ads May 19 '15 at 6:16
  • 3
    Dude, you saved my life, I've tried at least a dozen other solutions and yours is the only one that actually worked. I'm seriously thinking about creating 10 more accounts to vote your answer up 10 more times. Seriously thanks! – Carlo Aug 22 '15 at 9:52
  • 1
    I've never understood people's aversion to inline JS. Image loading happens separately and out of sequence from the rest of the page loading process. Therefore, this is the only valid solution to getting immediate feedback about image loading completion. However, if someone needs to wait for jQuery to load and that happens later, then they will have to not use the simple solution here and use one of the other solutions (Piotr's is probably the best option since it isn't dependent on pseudo-hacks but guari's height() check might be important too). A processing queue could be useful as well. – CubicleSoft Mar 17 '17 at 14:13

I just had this problem myself, searched everywhere for a solution that didn't involve killing my cache or downloading a plugin.

I didn't see this thread immediately so I found something else instead which is an interesting fix and (I think) worthy of posting here:

$('.image').load(function(){
    // stuff
}).attr('src', 'new_src');

I actually got this idea from the comments here: http://www.witheringtree.com/2009/05/image-load-event-binding-with-ie-using-jquery/

I have no idea why it works but I have tested this on IE7 and where it broke before it now works.

Hope it helps,

Edit

The accepted answer actually explains why:

If the src is already set then the event is firing in the cache cased before you get the event handler bound.

  • 3
    I've tested this is in a lot of browsers and haven't found it failing anywhere. I used $image.load(function(){ something(); }).attr('src', $image.attr('src')); to reset the original source. – Maurice Aug 29 '13 at 9:54
  • this is elegant, easy to read, and easy to remember. – code_monk Dec 11 '14 at 5:33
  • I've found that this approach does not work on iOS, at least for Safari/601.1 and Safari/602.1 – cronfy Aug 24 '17 at 10:21
  • Would be awesome to find out why, what browser is it in? – Sammaye Aug 24 '17 at 10:56
  • Oh sorry you said safari lol – Sammaye Aug 24 '17 at 10:56

You can also use this code with support for loading error:

$("img").on('load', function() {
  // do stuff on success
})
.on('error', function() {
  // do stuff on smth wrong (error 404, etc.)
})
.each(function() {
    if(this.complete) {
      $(this).load();
    } else if(this.error) {
      $(this).error();
    }
});
  • This one worked best for me. I think the key is to set the load handler first and then call it later in the each function. – GreenRaccoon23 Jul 27 '16 at 14:54

A modification to GUS's example:

$(document).ready(function() {
    var tmpImg = new Image() ;
    tmpImg.onload = function() {
        // Run onload code.
    } ;

tmpImg.src = $('#img').attr('src');
})

Set the source before and after the onload.

  • Like @Gus's answer, this won't work for multiple images...and there's no need to set the src before the attaching the onload handler, once afterwards will suffice. – Nick Craver Oct 6 '10 at 21:38
  • @Nick The question doesn't say anything about multiple images... – Chuck Conway Oct 6 '10 at 21:42
  • 4
    Sure it does, $("img") selects all <img> elements... – Nick Craver Oct 6 '10 at 21:44
  • @Nick Doh! I missed that. – Chuck Conway Oct 6 '10 at 21:47

By using jQuery to generate a new image with the image's src, and assigning the load method directly to that, the load method is successfully called when jQuery finishes generating the new image. This is working for me in IE 8, 9 and 10

$('<img />', {
    "src": $("#img").attr("src")
}).load(function(){
    // Do something
});
  • For those that use Ruby on Rails, with remote request, using __rjs.erb templates, this is the only solution I've found. Because using partials in js.erb, it looses de binding ($("#img".on("load")... and for images is NOT possible to delegate the "on" method: $("body").on("load","#img",function()... – Albert Català Jan 27 '16 at 2:51

Just re-add the src argument on a separate line after the img oject is defined. This will trick IE into triggering the lad-event. It is ugly, but it is the simplest workaround I've found so far.

jQuery('<img/>', {
    src: url,
    id: 'whatever'
})
.load(function() {
})
.appendTo('#someelement');
$('#whatever').attr('src', url); // trigger .load on IE

A solution I found https://bugs.chromium.org/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=7731#c12 (This code taken directly from the comment)

var photo = document.getElementById('image_id');
var img = new Image();
img.addEventListener('load', myFunction, false);
img.src = 'http://newimgsource.jpg';
photo.src = img.src;

I can give you a little tip if you want do like this:

<div style="position:relative;width:100px;height:100px">
     <img src="loading.jpg" style='position:absolute;width:100px;height:100px;z-index:0'/>
     <img onLoad="$(this).fadeIn('normal').siblings('img').fadeOut('normal')" src="picture.jpg" style="display:none;position:absolute;width:100px;height:100px;z-index:1"/>
</div>

If you do that when the browser caches pictures, it's no problem always img shown but loading img under real picture.

I had this problem with IE where the e.target.width would be undefined. The load event would fire but I couldn't get the dimensions of the image in IE (chrome + FF worked).

Turns out you need to look for e.currentTarget.naturalWidth & e.currentTarget.naturalHeight.

Once again, IE does things it's own (more complicated) way.

You can solve your problem using JAIL plugin that also allows you to lazy load images (improving the page performance) and passing the callback as parameter

$('img').asynchImageLoader({callback : function(){...}});

The HTML should look like

<img name="/global/images/sample1.jpg" src="/global/images/blank.gif" width="width" height="height" />

If you want a pure CSS solution, this trick works very well - use the transform object. This also works with images when they're cached or not:

CSS:

.main_container{
    position: relative;
    width: 500px;
    height: 300px;
    background-color: #cccccc;
}

.center_horizontally{
  position: absolute;
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  background-color: green;
  left: 50%;
  top: 0;
  transform: translate(-50%,0);
}

.center_vertically{
  position: absolute;
  top: 50%;
  left: 0;
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  background-color: blue;
  transform: translate(0,-50%);
}

.center{
  position: absolute;
  top: 50%;
  left: 50%;
  width: 100px;
  height: 100px;
  background-color: red;
  transform: translate(-50%,-50%);
}

HTML:

<div class="main_container">
  <div class="center_horizontally"></div>
  <div class="center_vertically"></div>
  <div class="center"></div>
  </div>
</div

Codepen example

Codepen LESS example

  • Could you give an example of how this works with image loading? – Hastig Zusammenstellen Nov 18 '16 at 9:40

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