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I have to read a text file from my Java application.

The file contains many rows and this file is updated every X minutes from an external unknown application that appends new lines to the file.

I have to read all the rows from the file and then I have to delete all the records that I've just read.

Is it possibile to let me read the file row by row, deleting each row I read and at the same time allowing the external application to append other rows to the file?

This file is located in a Samba shared folder so I'm using jCIFS to read/write the file and BufferedReader Java class.

thanks in advance

  • Changing a file which is written to by an application which is not under your control is a bad idea. Why do you need to delete? Perhaps it would be enough just to maintain a marker of how many lines you have read so far, without changing the file? – RealSkeptic Aug 4 '16 at 15:25
  • This is the sort of thing that Socket Writing and RESTful POST commands were made for. – Susannah Potts Aug 4 '16 at 15:26
  • @RealSkeptic I need to delete or update the lines that I've just read because I think that's the easiest way to mark the rows as "already processed". After processing a row, I have to store in a MySQL table so I don't need to leave the rows in the file anymore. – Roberto Milani Aug 4 '16 at 16:03
  • @SusannahPotts I know but unfortunately the external application is not under my control :) – Roberto Milani Aug 4 '16 at 16:04
  • @RobertoMilani This is true, I just couldn't hold that thought to myself. – Susannah Potts Aug 4 '16 at 16:05
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I don't know the perfect solution to your problem, but I would solve it differently:

  • rename the file (give it a unique name with an timestamp)
  • the appender job will then automatically re-create it
  • process your time-stamped files (no need to delete them, keep them in place so you can later check what happened)
  • "the appender job will then automatically re-create it" -> Not sure, for example if it do it only at launch. – N0un Aug 4 '16 at 15:23
  • @N0un not sure, true, but worth a shot. – Sean Patrick Floyd Aug 4 '16 at 15:24
  • @SeanPatrickFloyd Unless a client expects their application to be doing this in a very specific way in a production environment. – Susannah Potts Aug 4 '16 at 15:25
  • 2
    @SusannahPotts well yeah, at the end of the day, talking to each other can save lives – Sean Patrick Floyd Aug 4 '16 at 15:26
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Problem is we don't know how the external application write and/or reuse this file. It could be a problem if you delete rows while the external application use a counter to run correctly...

There is no good solution unless you know how the other app works.

0

Is it possibile to let me read the file row by row, deleting each row I read and at the same time allowing the external application to append other rows to the file?

Yes, you can open the same file for reading and writing from multiple processes. In Linux, for example, you will get two separate file descriptors for the same file. For file writes under the size of PIPE_BUF, or 4096 bytes in Linux, it is safe to assume the operations are atomic, meaning the kernel is handling the locking and unlocking to prevent race conditions.

Assuming Process A is writing to the file has opened it as APPEND, then each time Process A tells the kernel to write() it will first seek to the size of the file (the end of the file). That means you can safely delete data in the file from Process B as long it is done in between the write operations of Process A. And as long as the write operations from Process A don't exceed PIPE_BUF, Linux guarantees they will be atomic, i.e. Process A can spam write operations and process B can constantly delete/write data, and no funky behavior will result.

Java provides you with implemented File Locks. But it's important to understand that it is only "advisory," not "mandatory." Java does not enforce the restriction, both processes must implement a check to see if another process holds the lock.

  • Locking? Linux will handle it? Can you show documentation which confirms this assertion? – RealSkeptic Aug 4 '16 at 15:31
  • @RealSkeptic I can't find an official post from Linus Torvald. But if you google it you will find an abundance of evidence in books, websites, and Operating Systems courses. Here is one example. Also, more stackoverflow support. – Mike S Aug 4 '16 at 15:52
  • For file writes under the size of PIPE_BUF, or 4096 bytes in Linux, it is safe to assume the operations are atomic, meaning the kernel is handling the locking and unlocking to prevent race conditions. Usually true - but in this case it's a shared file system that's apparently being updated across network connections. Reading from a file being written to is hard enough to do reliably with low-level C code on a local file - doing it in Java across a network and modifying the file concurrently with the writing process is going to be extremely difficult at best. – Andrew Henle Aug 4 '16 at 16:27
  • Especially as input is usually buffered to an unknown size which may well be after that limit. – RealSkeptic Aug 4 '16 at 16:37
  • @RealSkeptic inputs are buffered at high levels, like programming languages or network protocols. The kernel is not so carefree because accuracy and atomicity are extremely important. The kernel will not buffer these writes, it will either block until unlocked or return an errno, depending on whether O_NONBLOCK flag is set. – Mike S Aug 4 '16 at 17:20

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