3

In Julia, what is the fastest way to do:

enter image description here

where $y_t$ is an $n$-dimensional column vector of variables at time t.

In Julia code, one option is:

A = zeros(n,n);
for j=1:T
    A = A + Y(j,:)'*Y(j,:);
end

where

Y = [y_1' 
    ... 
    y_T']` 

is a (Txn)matrix.

But, is there a faster way ? Thanks.

2

If you know the components of y_t in advance, the simplest, easiest, and likely fastest way is simply:

A = Y*Y'

Where the different values of y_t are stored as columns in the matrix Y.

If you don't know the component of y_t in advance, you can use BLAS:

n = 100;
t = 1000;
Y = rand(n,t);

outer_sum = zeros(n,n);

for tdx = 1:t
    BLAS.ger!(1.0, Y[:,tdx], Y[:,tdx], outer_sum)
end

See this post (for a similar example) in case you're new to BLAS and would like help interpreting the arguments in this function here.

One of the key things here is to store the y_t vectors as columns rather than as rows of Y because accessing columns is much faster than accessing rows. See the Julia performance tips for more info on this.

Update for the second option (where it isn't known in advance what the components of Y will be, BLAS will sometimes but not always be fastest. The big determining factor is the size of the vector you're using. Calling BLAS incurs a certain overhead and so is only worthwhile in certain settings. Julia's native matrix multiplication will automatically chose whether to use BLAS, and will generally do a good job with it. But, if you know ahead of time that you're dealing with a situation where BLAS will be optimal, then you can save the Julia optimizer some work (and thus speed up your code) by specifying it ahead of time.

See the great response by roygvib below. It presents a LOT of creative and instructive ways to compute this sum of dot products. Many will be faster than BLAS in certain situations. From the time trials that roygvib presents, it looks like the break-even point is around n = 3000.

3

For comparison, I have tried several codes for computing the A matrix (which I hope to be what OP wants...), including built-in matrix multiplication, BLAS.ger!, and explicit loops:

print_(x) = print(rpad(x,12))

# built-in vector * vector'
function perf0v( n, T, Y )
    print_("perf0v")
    out = zeros(n,n)
    for t = 1 : T
        out += slice( Y, :,t ) * slice( Y, :,t )'
    end
    return out
end

# built-in matrix * matrix'
function perf0m( n, T, Y )
    print_("perf0m")
    out = Y * Y'
    return out
end

# BLAS.ger!
function perf1( n, T, Y )
    print_("perf1")
    out = zeros(n,n)
    for t = 1 : T
        BLAS.ger!( 1.0, Y[ :,t ], Y[ :,t ], out )
    end
    return out
end

# BLAS.ger! with sub
function perf1sub( n, T, Y )
    print_("perf1sub")
    out = zeros(n,n)
    for t = 1 : T
        BLAS.ger!( 1.0, sub( Y, :,t ), sub( Y, :,t ), out )
    end
    return out
end

# explicit loop
function perf2( n, T, Y )
    print_("perf2")
    out = zeros(n,n)
    for t  = 1 : T,
        i2 = 1 : n,
        i1 = 1 : n
        out[ i1, i2 ] += Y[ i1, t ] * Y[ i2, t ]
    end
    return out
end

# explicit loop with simd
function perf2simd( n, T, Y )
    print_("perf2simd")
    out = zeros(n,n)
    for i2 = 1 : n,
        i1 = 1 : n
        @simd for t = 1 : T
            out[ i1, i2 ] += Y[ i1, t ] * Y[ i2, t ]
        end
    end
    return out
end

# transposed perf2
function perf2tr( n, T, Yt )
    print_("perf2tr")
    out = zeros(n,n)
    for t  = 1 : T,
        i2 = 1 : n,
        i1 = 1 : n
        out[ i1, i2 ] += Yt[ t, i1 ] * Yt[ t, i2 ]
    end
    return out
end

# transposed perf2simd
function perf2simdtr( n, T, Yt )
    print_("perf2simdtr")
    out = zeros(n,n)
    for i2 = 1 : n,
        i1 = 1 : n
        @simd for t = 1 : T
            out[ i1, i2 ] += Yt[ t, i1 ] * Yt[ t, i2 ]
        end
    end
    return out
end

#.........................................................

n = 100
T = 1000
@show n, T

Y = rand( n, T )
Yt = copy( Y' )

out = Dict()

for loop = 1:2
    println("loop = ", loop)

    for fn in [ perf0v, perf0m, perf1, perf1sub, perf2, perf2simd ]
        @time out[ fn ] = fn( n, T, Y )
    end
    for fn in [ perf2tr, perf2simdtr ]
        @time out[ fn ] = fn( n, T, Yt )
    end
end

# Check
error = 0.0
for k1 in keys( out ),
    k2 in keys( out )
    @assert sumabs( out[ k1 ] ) > 0.0
    @assert sumabs( out[ k2 ] ) > 0.0
    error += sumabs( out[ k1 ] - out[ k2 ] )
end
@show error

The result obtained with julia -O --check-bounds=no test.jl (ver0.4.5) is:

(n,T) = (100,1000)
loop = 2
perf0v        0.056345 seconds (15.04 k allocations: 154.803 MB, 31.66% gc time)
perf0m        0.000785 seconds (7 allocations: 78.406 KB)
perf1         0.155182 seconds (5.96 k allocations: 1.846 MB)
perf1sub      0.155089 seconds (8.01 k allocations: 359.625 KB)
perf2         0.011192 seconds (6 allocations: 78.375 KB)
perf2simd     0.016677 seconds (6 allocations: 78.375 KB)
perf2tr       0.011698 seconds (6 allocations: 78.375 KB)
perf2simdtr   0.009682 seconds (6 allocations: 78.375 KB)

and for some different values of n & T:

(n,T) = (1000,100)
loop = 2
perf0v        0.610885 seconds (2.01 k allocations: 1.499 GB, 25.11% gc time)
perf0m        0.008866 seconds (9 allocations: 7.630 MB)
perf1         0.182409 seconds (606 allocations: 9.177 MB)
perf1sub      0.180720 seconds (806 allocations: 7.657 MB, 0.67% gc time)
perf2         0.104961 seconds (6 allocations: 7.630 MB)
perf2simd     0.119964 seconds (6 allocations: 7.630 MB)
perf2tr       0.137186 seconds (6 allocations: 7.630 MB)
perf2simdtr   0.103878 seconds (6 allocations: 7.630 MB)

(n,T) = (2000,100)
loop = 2
perf0v        2.514622 seconds (2.01 k allocations: 5.993 GB, 24.38% gc time)
perf0m        0.035801 seconds (9 allocations: 30.518 MB)
perf1         0.473479 seconds (606 allocations: 33.591 MB, 0.04% gc time)
perf1sub      0.475796 seconds (806 allocations: 30.545 MB, 0.95% gc time)
perf2         0.422808 seconds (6 allocations: 30.518 MB)
perf2simd     0.488539 seconds (6 allocations: 30.518 MB)
perf2tr       0.554685 seconds (6 allocations: 30.518 MB)
perf2simdtr   0.400741 seconds (6 allocations: 30.518 MB)

(n,T) = (3000,100)
loop = 2
perf0v        5.444797 seconds (2.21 k allocations: 13.483 GB, 20.77% gc time)
perf0m        0.080458 seconds (9 allocations: 68.665 MB)
perf1         0.927325 seconds (806 allocations: 73.261 MB, 0.02% gc time)
perf1sub      0.926690 seconds (806 allocations: 68.692 MB, 0.51% gc time)
perf2         0.958189 seconds (6 allocations: 68.665 MB)
perf2simd     1.067098 seconds (6 allocations: 68.665 MB)
perf2tr       1.765001 seconds (6 allocations: 68.665 MB)
perf2simdtr   0.902838 seconds (6 allocations: 68.665 MB) 

Hmm, so the built-in matrix * matrix (Y * Y') was fastest. It seems that BLAS gemm is called at the end (from the output of @less Y * Y').

  • Whether BLAS is most efficient depends on size of matrices/vectors, larger size tends to favor BLAS. – Michael Ohlrogge Aug 5 '16 at 0:52
  • Also in your time trials, why not also include Y*Y'? – Michael Ohlrogge Aug 5 '16 at 1:03
  • 1
    Among the above patterns, Y * Y' was fastest (probably because of BLAS). I didn't know that this is calculated automatically by BLAS up to now... Thanks :) – roygvib Aug 5 '16 at 1:34
  • 1
    it depends, it isn't always done with BLAS. My understanding is that Julia will try to determine which is most efficient. There is some overhead to calling BLAS, and so it doesn't always make sense. As a first guess, Julia's built-in functions tend to be pretty good, but if you know ahead of time that BLAS will be best then you can save a bit of time by not making Julia need to apply its logic to make a decision (which usually but won't always be best). – Michael Ohlrogge Aug 5 '16 at 1:44
  • Nice work putting together all the time trials! – Michael Ohlrogge Aug 5 '16 at 1:45
1

For the sake of completion, here is another, vectorised approach:

Assume Y is as follows:

julia> Y = rand(1:10, 10,5)
10×5 Array{Int64,2}:
 2   1   6   2  10
 8   2   6   8   2
 2  10  10   4   6
 5   9   8   5   1
 5   4   9   9   4
 4   6   3   4   8
 2   9   2   8   1
 6   8   5  10   2
 1   7  10   6   9
 8   7  10  10   8

julia> Y = reshape(Y, 10,5,1); # add a singular 3rd dimension, so we can 
                               # be allowed to shuffle the dimensions

The idea is that you create one array which is defined in dimensions 1 and 3, and only has one column, and you array-multiply this by an array which is defined in dimensions 2 and 3, but only has one row. Your 'Time' variable varies along dimension 3. This essentially results in the individual kronecker products from each timestep, concatenated along the time (i.e. 3rd) dimension.

julia> KroneckerProducts = permutedims(Y, [2,3,1]) .* permutedims(Y, [3,2,1]);

Now it wasn't clear to me if your end result was meant to be an "nxn" matrix, resulting from the sum of all timings at each 'kronecker' position

julia> sum(KroneckerProducts, 3)
5×5×1 Array{Int64,3}:
[:, :, 1] =
 243  256  301  324  192
 256  481  442  427  291
 301  442  555  459  382
 324  427  459  506  295
 192  291  382  295  371

or simply the sum of all the elements in that massive 3D array

julia> sum(KroneckerProducts)
8894

Choose your preferred poison :p

I'm not sure this will be faster than Michael's approach above, since the permutedims step is presumably expensive, and for very large arrays it may actually be a bottleneck (but I don't know how it's implemented in Julia ... maybe it's not!), so it may not necessarily perform better than a simple loop iterating for each timestep, even though it's "vectorised code". You can try both approaches and see for yourself what is fastest for your particular arrays!

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