6

We received code from a subcontractor that does essentially the following:

class Callable
{
public:
    void operator()(int x)
    {
        printf("x = %d\n", x);
    }
};

template<typename T>
class UsesTheCallable
{
public:
    UsesTheCallable(T callable) :
            m_callable(NULL)
    {
        m_callable = &callable;
    }

    ~UsesTheCallable() {}

    void call() { (*m_callable)(5); }

private:
    T* m_callable;
};

This strikes me as being undefined code...they pass in the T by value to the UsesTheCallable constructor then assign the m_callable member to the address of the argument, which should go out of scope at tne end of the constructor, and so anytime I call UsesTheCallable::call(), I'm acting on an object that no longer exists.

So I tried it with this main method:

int main(int, char**)
{
    UsesTheCallable<Callable>* u = NULL;

    {
        Callable c;
        u = new UsesTheCallable<Callable>(c);
    }

    u->call();

    delete u;

    return 0;
}

I make sure that the Callable object goes out of scope before I call UsesTheCallable::call(), so I should be calling the function on memory that I don't actually own at that point. But the code works, and Valgrind reports no memory errors, even if I put some member data into the Callable class and make the operator() function act on that member data.

Am I correct that this code is undefined behavior? Is there any difference in the "defined-ness" of this code based on whether or not Callable has member data (e.g. a private int variable or something)?

  • Just because something "works" does not mean the behavior you saw was undefined. It could "work" now, and you add some random unrelated line of code and it stops working. – iheanyi Aug 4 '16 at 18:44
  • @iheanyi: Well, the OP seems to know that, or they wouldn't be asking us whether the code had UB. – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 4 '16 at 18:44
  • @iheanyi I realize that. I just wanted to make sure it was undefined before telling our subcontractor that they have no clue what they're doing – villapx Aug 4 '16 at 18:45
  • 3
    @villapx: You may now safely go ahead and do that. :) Although, perhaps give them a chance to own up to a simple typo or brief lapse in judgement first. You should definitely review the rest of the code you've received from them, though. As it happens, I've been a subcontractor for your company in the past (not this subcontractor!!) and, well, mistakes do happen (okay I'd never make code this bad!). – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 4 '16 at 18:46
  • @LightnessRacesinOrbit Interesting! It's a small world we live in indeed – villapx Aug 4 '16 at 19:03
7

Yes this is undefined behavior. After the closing brace of the constructor callable is destroyed and you have a dangling pointer.

The reason you are not seeing adverse effects is that you really aren't using the instance after it goes out of scope. The function call operator is stateless so it is not trying to access the memory that it no longer owns.

If we add some state to the callable like

class Callable
{
    int foo;
public:
    Callable (int foo = 20) : foo(foo) {}
    void operator()(int x)
    {
        printf("x = %d\n", x*foo);
    }
};

and then we use

int main()
{
    UsesTheCallable<Callable>* u = NULL;
    {
        Callable c(50);
        u = new UsesTheCallable<Callable>(c);
    }
    u->call();
    delete u;
    return 0;
}

Then you could see this bad behavior. In that run it outputs x = 772773112 which is not correct.

  • 1
    You again! .... ;) – Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 4 '16 at 18:42
  • 1
    One of us is stalking the other me thinks ;) – NathanOliver Aug 4 '16 at 18:43
  • "You will see bad behavior." Not necessarily. That could still print 50. – Barry Aug 4 '16 at 18:55
  • @Barry Is it better now? I did not phrase that right the first time. – NathanOliver Aug 4 '16 at 18:57
  • It's better - but it still implies that you can verify UB-ness by simply writing code examples. T.C.'s yelled at me in the past for this :) – Barry Aug 4 '16 at 19:00
7
m_callable = &callable;

Am I correct that this code is undefined behavior?

Yes, this is bullsh!t, for the reason you give.

But the code works

Yeah, well, that's what happens with UB…

and Valgrind reports no memory errors

…particularly when the memory you're operating on still "belongs" to your process. There's nothing for Valgrind to detect here; it doesn't validate C++ scopes, only "physical" memory accesses. And the program doesn't crash because nothing's yet had much of a chance to mangle the memory that used to be taken up by c.

"Physical" in the sense that I'm referring to the OS and its memory management, rather than C++'s abstract concepts. It could actually be virtual memory or whatever.

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