I'm currently trying to implement testing for a calculator that I'm building (using composite pattern.) The first method should add $75, which works fine, however when the second method runs, "service" is reset and has $0 as job cost. If I combine both methods into one, then everything works as I expect it to. How do I retain value in service field?

[TestClass()]
public class JobTests
{
    private Service service;
    private LaborTime laborTime;
    private LaborRates laborRates;

    [TestInitialize]
    public void init()
    {
        service = new EmergencyService();
    }

    [TestMethod()]
    // add one hour of service at $75/50 rate
    public void Job_OnFullCost_Is75()
    {
        // Arrange
        laborTime = new LaborTime(
            checkIn: new DateTime(year: 2016, month: 7, day: 20, hour: 10, minute: 0, second: 0),
            checkOut: new DateTime(year: 2016, month: 7, day: 20, hour: 11, minute: 0, second: 0)
        );
        laborRates = new LaborRates(75, 50);
        service = new Labor(service, laborTime, laborRates);

        // Act
        var expected = 75.0M;
        var actual = service.JobCost;

        // Assert
        Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
    }

    [TestMethod()]
    // add another hour to the service, at same rate of $175/60
    public void Job_OnFullCost_Is125()
    {
        // Arrange
        laborTime = new LaborTime(
            checkIn: new DateTime(year: 2016, month: 7, day: 20, hour: 12, minute: 0, second: 0),
            checkOut: new DateTime(year: 2016, month: 7, day: 20, hour: 13, minute: 0, second: 0)
        );
        LaborRates laborRates = new LaborRates(75, 50);
        service = new Labor(service, laborTime, laborRates);
        //service.IsContinuation = true;

        // Act
        var expected = 125.0M;
        var actual = service.JobCost;

        // Assert
        Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
    }
}
  • [TestInitialize] is called for each test method so it will reset for each test method. Have you tried just initializing the service private Service service = new EmergencyService(); – Nkosi Aug 4 '16 at 20:12
  • That's good to know. I changed the code but it still isn't working. – haosmark Aug 4 '16 at 20:13
  • 2
    My advice would be to not make a unit test that is dependent on another one. Make two tests. One that adds the first hour. Then, the second test that adds the first hour, and then adds the second hour. – Wyatt Earp Aug 4 '16 at 20:17
  • 1
    You should also note that test methods are not executed in a defined order so it could be the that the method that is failing is executing first when it is expecting the other method to have been executed – Nkosi Aug 4 '16 at 20:17
  • @Nkosi VSTest has ordered tests. But I agree with all of you that it's not the way to go – Matías Fidemraizer Aug 4 '16 at 20:28
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Since unit tests are not guaranteed to all be run together, or to be run in a specific order, it's best practice to avoid adding a temporal dependency between them (i.e. requiring them to be run in a specific order in order to work right).

Instead, extract out the "hard parts" of adding labor into a separate helper method, and make your two methods test specific scenarios.

[TestClass()]
public class JobTests
{
    private Service service;

    [TestInitialize]
    public void init()
    {
        service = new EmergencyService();
    }

    [TestMethod()]
    // add one hour of service at $75/50 rate
    public void Job_OnFullCost_Is75()
    {
        // Arrange
        AddHourOfService(75, 50);

        // Act
        var expected = 75.0M;
        var actual = service.JobCost;

        // Assert
        Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
    }

    [TestMethod()]
    // add another hour to the service, at same rate of $175/60
    public void Job_OnFullCost_Is125()
    {
        // Arrange
        AddHourOfService(75, 50);
        AddHourOfService(75, 50);

        // Act
        var expected = 125.0M;
        var actual = service.JobCost;

        // Assert
        Assert.AreEqual(expected, actual);
    }

    private void AddHourOfService(int cost, int time)
    {
        var laborTime = new LaborTime(
        checkIn: new DateTime(year: 2016, month: 7, day: 20, hour: 10, minute: 0, second: 0),
        checkOut: new DateTime(year: 2016, month: 7, day: 20, hour: 11, minute: 0, second: 0)
    );
        var laborRates = new LaborRates(75, 50);
        service = new Labor(service, laborTime, laborRates);
    }
}

Besides removing temporal coupling between tests, this also has the nice side-effect of making the tests' purpose obvious straight from the code. You no longer need comments like "add one hour of service at $75/50 rate" because AddHourOfService(75, 50) makes it pretty obvious that's what happens. Letting code self-document this way is good because it's too easy for comments to get out of sync with your code (as you can see by your second comment which says "$175/60" when that's clearly not what the test is doing).

  • Good point and good idea. Thank you. – haosmark Aug 4 '16 at 20:32

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