The "hello, world" of template meta-programming can be considered the factorial code:

template <unsigned int n>
struct factorial {
    enum { value = n * factorial<n - 1>::value };
};

template <>
struct factorial<0> {
    enum { value = 1 };
};

So we can get the factorial by doing

cout << factorial<4>::value << endl; //It will print 24

But if I do:

int N = 4;
cout << factorial<N>::value << endl; //COMPILE ERROR

Is there a way to give dynamically values to a templated function in C++?

  • There are a few tricks you can apply. See this post for details. This Youtube video also describes an even better solution, though for a different problem. – Xirema Aug 5 '16 at 17:07
  • Also: there are a lot of people downvoting this post for inadequately explained reasons. The question seems legit. – Xirema Aug 5 '16 at 17:08
  • 2
    @Xirema: If you want to evaluate a template at compile time, based on a value given at runtime, you need a time machine. If that isn't immediately clear, you shouldn't be sitting in front of a computer. – IInspectable Aug 5 '16 at 17:11
  • @IInspectable I advise you look at the links I provided, as you'll see that's not what they're doing. They're simply providing O(1) access to the values at runtime. – Xirema Aug 5 '16 at 17:12
  • @Xirema: Retrieving the result of a function with linear complexity with O(1) necessitates, that the value cannot be calculated at runtime. – IInspectable Aug 5 '16 at 17:15
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This might work for you.

#include<iostream>
#include<array>
#include<utility>

//Only >=c++14 supports doubles in constexpr, so we're sticking to integers.
template<unsigned int I>
struct FAC {
    static constexpr uint64_t val = I * FAC<I-1>::val;
};

template<>
struct FAC<0> {
    static constexpr uint64_t val = 0;
};

template<>
struct FAC<1> {
    static constexpr uint64_t val = 1;
};

template<size_t ... I>
uint64_t factorial_impl(std::index_sequence<I...>, const unsigned int i) {
    constexpr std::array<uint64_t, sizeof...(I)> a = {FAC<I>::val...};

    return a[i];
}

uint64_t factorial(const unsigned int i) {
    return factorial_impl(std::make_index_sequence<22>(), i); //Can't store factorial values above index 22 without using floating-point values
}

int main() {
    std::cout << "Which factorial do you want? [1-22]: ";
    unsigned int index = 0;
    std::cin >> index;
    std::cout << "Value of " << index << " is " << factorial(index) << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

If you'd rather it work with doubles, you'll need a c++14-compliant compiler, but this slight modification should work:

#include <iostream>
#include<array>
#include<utility>

template<unsigned int I>
struct FAC {
    static constexpr double val = I * FAC<I-1>::val;
};

template<>
struct FAC<0> {
    static constexpr double val = 0;
};

template<>
struct FAC<1> {
    static constexpr double val = 1;
};

template<size_t ... I>
double factorial_impl(std::index_sequence<I...>, const unsigned int i) {
    constexpr std::array<double, sizeof...(I)> a = {FAC<I>::val...};

    return a[i];
}

double factorial(const unsigned int i) {
    return factorial_impl(std::make_index_sequence<170>(), i); //Values above 170 are infinite.
}

int main() {
    std::cout << "Which factorial do you want? [1-170]: ";
    unsigned int index = 0;
    std::cin >> index;
    std::cout << "Value of " << index << " is " << factorial(index) << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

No, you cannot do that. The whole point of template meta-programming is to do some computation at compile-time. The entire recursive chain of expansions from your factorial example is done by the compiler, so it must know the value of n in order to complete the computation.

When you do not know the value of n until runtime, the "regular" style of programming applies, so the invocation factorial<N>::value becomes unnecessary.

The best you can is this:

constexpr int N = 4;
std::cout << factorial<N>::value << std::endl;

But you won't be able to modify N at run-time, so I guess it doesn't help much more than for a small example.

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