24

I would like to encrypt a string in .NET Core using a key. I have a client / server scenario and would like to encrypt a string on the client, send it to the server and decrypt it.

As .NET Core is still in a early stage (e.g. Rijndael is not yet available), what are my options?

  • 2
    As per the comment here, it's looking to be implemented in version 1.1. Till then, you could use AES as shown here – keyboardP Aug 5 '16 at 17:53
31

You really shouldn't ever use Rijndael/RijndaelManaged in .NET. If you're using it with a BlockSize value of 128 (which is the default) then you're using AES, as I explained in a similar question.

The symmetric encryption options available in .NET Core are:

  • AES (System.Security.Cryptography.Aes.Create())
  • 3DES (System.Security.Cryptography.TripleDES.Create())

And for asymmetric encryption

  • RSA (System.Security.Cryptography.RSA.Create())

Especially on .NET Core the factories are the best way to go, because they will give back an object which works on the currently executing operating system. For example, RSACng is a public type but only works on Windows; and RSAOpenSsl is a public type but is only supported on Linux and macOS.

  • I'm working with .Net Core with System.Security.Cryptograph, and it appears the Aes "Create()" function is missing. I've included the "System.Security.Cryptography.Algorithms": "4.3.0" to my project.json, am I missing a reference? This is the compile error below. Error CS0426 The type name 'Create' does not exist in the type 'Aes' – phanf Feb 11 '17 at 21:23
  • 1
    @phanf apisof.net/catalog/System.Security.Cryptography.Aes.Create() says it was there in all versions of .NET Core. Are you perhaps using a different type of the same name? – bartonjs Feb 11 '17 at 22:10
  • Also not able to find create() methods on various classes in this package. Latest dotnet core on macsosx. – kevinc May 9 '17 at 11:05
24

There is already an answer to this but I think that we can provide a simpler solution.

If you simply want to protect your data, there is an implementation for this in .NET Core which relieves you from the headaches of encryption; DataProtectionProvider.

In Startup.cs:

public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services)
{
    services.AddDataProtection(); //Add this
    [..]
    services.AddMvc();
}

If you would like, it is possible to specify algorithms (using Microsoft.AspNetCore.DataProtection) used for encryption and validation, like this:

services.AddDataProtection()
       .UseCryptographicAlgorithms(new AuthenticatedEncryptionSettings()
       {
           EncryptionAlgorithm = EncryptionAlgorithm.AES_256_GCM,
           ValidationAlgorithm = ValidationAlgorithm.HMACSHA256
       });

Then encrypt/decrypt using a service as such:

public class CipherService : ICipherService
{
    private readonly IDataProtectionProvider _dataProtectionProvider;
    private const string Key = "my-very-long-key-of-no-exact-size";

    public CipherService(IDataProtectionProvider dataProtectionProvider)
    {
        _dataProtectionProvider = dataProtectionProvider;
    }

    public string Encrypt(string input)
    {
        var protector = _dataProtectionProvider.CreateProtector(Key);
        return protector.Protect(input);
    }

    public string Decrypt(string cipherText)
    {
        var protector = _dataProtectionProvider.CreateProtector(Key);
        return protector.Unprotect(cipherText);
    }
}

Edit As mentioned in the comments below it might be a good idea to understand that using the DataProtectionProvider like this will only work on the same machine with keys stored on local disk.

  • 2
    Is this able to be used in .NET MVC as well? – LatentDenis May 30 '17 at 19:23
  • 13
    It's worth noting that the keys here are stored on the machine (by default), so it can only be decrypted by the machine that encrypted it. Use distributed DataProtection like Microsoft.AspNetCore.DataProtection.Redis to share keys if you need to be able to decrypt it on multiple instances of an app or different services (like in Single Sign On). – hofnarwillie Aug 27 '17 at 22:31
  • 13
    The "my-very-long-key-of-no-exact-size" is not an excrpytion key, just a unique name for the protector. The actual keys are stored as files on disk by default (so watch out if on a web farm) – alastairtree Mar 1 '18 at 13:50
  • 4
    You should edit your answer since someone will have a bad day when they deploy this code on more then one instance and one instance and the key will not be the same. – user1852503 Sep 12 '18 at 10:34
  • 4
    Microsoft recommends to not use this for long lived protected data. – Nick Turner Feb 21 at 16:25
14

Here is a trivial sample without authentication:

var text = "Hello World";
var buffer = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(text);

var iv = GetRandomData(128);
var keyAes = GetRandomData(256);


byte[] result;
using (var aes = Aes.Create())
{
    aes.Key = keyAes;
    aes.IV = iv;

    using (var encryptor = aes.CreateEncryptor(aes.Key, aes.IV))
    using (var resultStream = new MemoryStream())
    {
        using (var aesStream = new CryptoStream(resultStream, encryptor, CryptoStreamMode.Write))
        using (var plainStream = new MemoryStream(buffer))
        {
            plainStream.CopyTo(aesStream);
        }

        result = resultStream.ToArray();
    }
}

For key generation:

private static byte[] GetRandomData(int bits)
{
    var result = new byte[bits / 8];
    RandomNumberGenerator.Create().GetBytes(result);
    return result;
}
  • You can also avoid use of streams if your byte[] is small enough, and use encryptor.TransformFinalBlock(buffer, 0, buffer.Length) – Jim W says reinstate Monica Jan 30 '17 at 17:54
  • Less code, less objects to create, what's not to like? – Jim W says reinstate Monica Feb 19 '17 at 21:15
  • this just shifts the problem. now you have to store the key & iv somewhere secure. – Mike D. Nov 1 at 1:07
7

I have a different approach where I want to encrypt a string with a key and get a scrambled string which I can decrypt by the same key again. See the following extension methods:

    public static string Encrypt(this string text, string key)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(key))
            throw new ArgumentException("Key must have valid value.", nameof(key));
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(text))
            throw new ArgumentException("The text must have valid value.", nameof(text));

        var buffer = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(text);
        var hash = new SHA512CryptoServiceProvider();
        var aesKey = new byte[24];
        Buffer.BlockCopy(hash.ComputeHash(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(key)), 0, aesKey, 0, 24);

        using (var aes = Aes.Create())
        {
            if (aes == null)
                throw new ArgumentException("Parameter must not be null.", nameof(aes));

            aes.Key = aesKey;

            using (var encryptor = aes.CreateEncryptor(aes.Key, aes.IV))
            using (var resultStream = new MemoryStream())
            {
                using (var aesStream = new CryptoStream(resultStream, encryptor, CryptoStreamMode.Write))
                using (var plainStream = new MemoryStream(buffer))
                {
                    plainStream.CopyTo(aesStream);
                }

                var result = resultStream.ToArray();
                var combined = new byte[aes.IV.Length + result.Length];
                Array.ConstrainedCopy(aes.IV, 0, combined, 0, aes.IV.Length);
                Array.ConstrainedCopy(result, 0, combined, aes.IV.Length, result.Length);

                return Convert.ToBase64String(combined);
            }
        }
    }

    public static string Decrypt(this string encryptedText, string key)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(key))
            throw new ArgumentException("Key must have valid value.", nameof(key));
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(encryptedText))
            throw new ArgumentException("The encrypted text must have valid value.", nameof(encryptedText));

        var combined = Convert.FromBase64String(encryptedText);
        var buffer = new byte[combined.Length];
        var hash = new SHA512CryptoServiceProvider();
        var aesKey = new byte[24];
        Buffer.BlockCopy(hash.ComputeHash(Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(key)), 0, aesKey, 0, 24);

        using (var aes = Aes.Create())
        {
            if (aes == null)
                throw new ArgumentException("Parameter must not be null.", nameof(aes));

            aes.Key = aesKey;

            var iv = new byte[aes.IV.Length];
            var ciphertext = new byte[buffer.Length - iv.Length];

            Array.ConstrainedCopy(combined, 0, iv, 0, iv.Length);
            Array.ConstrainedCopy(combined, iv.Length, ciphertext, 0, ciphertext.Length);

            aes.IV = iv;

            using (var decryptor = aes.CreateDecryptor(aes.Key, aes.IV))
            using (var resultStream = new MemoryStream())
            {
                using (var aesStream = new CryptoStream(resultStream, decryptor, CryptoStreamMode.Write))
                using (var plainStream = new MemoryStream(ciphertext))
                {
                    plainStream.CopyTo(aesStream);
                }

                return Encoding.UTF8.GetString(resultStream.ToArray());
            }
        }
    }
  • I like what you've posted and am interested in using the same method but have a couple of questions: What does combined contain before being base64 encoded and why would we want to do this instead of just using result? – Professor of programming Nov 7 '18 at 17:23
  • 1
    The array combined contains bytes or rather 8-bit unsigned integers. This is totally fine depending on what you want to do with it. In my use case I needed a valid string representation of those encrypted data. Encoding using UTF-8 or something similar wouldn't work because not every byte value has a valid UTF-8 representation. Base64 on the other hand is exactly designed to represent binary data as ASCII string. Have a look at Wikipedia if you're interested. If you don't need a string the code can be easily changed to return just the bytes. – iss0 Nov 8 '18 at 18:25
  • 2
    The cipertext produced is not deterministic, different runs of Encrypt() with same key and plaintext produce different ciphertexts – Richard Anderssen Jul 4 at 16:59
3

The data protection system is enabled by default for ASP.NET Core applications. You don't even need to do anything in your StartUp method unless you want to reconfigure the default key storage location or the life time of keys. In which case you'd do the following in your ConfigureServices method:

services.ConfigureDataProtection(dp =>
    {
        dp.PersistKeysToFileSystem(new DirectoryInfo(@"c:\keys"));
        dp.SetDefaultKeyLifetime(TimeSpan.FromDays(14));
    });

Because the data protection system is in the application's services collection by default, it can be made available via dependency injection. Here's how you can inject the IDataProtectionProvider into a controller and then use it to create an instance of an IDataProtector in the controller's constructor:

public class HomeController : Controller
{
    IDataProtector _protector;

    public HomeController(IDataProtectionProvider provider)
    {
        _protector = provider.CreateProtector(GetType().FullName);
    }
}

You can then call the protector to encrypt content like this:

public IActionResult Index()
{
    var model = _service.GetAll().Select(c => new ContractViewModel {
        Id = _protector.Protect(c.Id.ToString()),
        Name = c.Name }).ToList();
    return View(model);
}

I hope this helps :)

  • Your approach was mentioned above from Marcus already, but you will find a lots of comment there, which say, that real keys are saved at the file system and you are not able to use the same encrypted values in other environments for decryption purposes – Tobias Raphael Dieckmann Mar 26 at 19:59
0

You can do by using System.Security.Cryptography

 string keyString = "encrypt123456789";
            var key = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(keyString);//16 bit or 32 bit key string

            using (var aesAlg = Aes.Create())
            {
                using (var encryptor = aesAlg.CreateEncryptor(key, aesAlg.IV))
                {
                    using (var msEncrypt = new MemoryStream())
                    {
                        using (var csEncrypt = new CryptoStream(msEncrypt, encryptor, CryptoStreamMode.Write))
                        using (var swEncrypt = new StreamWriter(csEncrypt))
                        {
                            swEncrypt.Write(text);
                        }

                        var iv = aesAlg.IV;

                        var decryptedContent = msEncrypt.ToArray();

                        var result = new byte[iv.Length + decryptedContent.Length];

                        Buffer.BlockCopy(iv, 0, result, 0, iv.Length);
                        Buffer.BlockCopy(decryptedContent, 0, result, iv.Length, decryptedContent.Length);

                        return Convert.ToBase64String(result);
                    }
                }
            }

For Decryption

var fullCipher = Convert.FromBase64String(cipherText);

            var iv = new byte[16];
            var cipher = new byte[16];

            Buffer.BlockCopy(fullCipher, 0, iv, 0, iv.Length);
            Buffer.BlockCopy(fullCipher, iv.Length, cipher, 0, iv.Length);
            var key = Encoding.UTF8.GetBytes(keyString);//same key string

            using (var aesAlg = Aes.Create())
            {
                using (var decryptor = aesAlg.CreateDecryptor(key, iv))
                {
                    string result;
                    using (var msDecrypt = new MemoryStream(cipher))
                    {
                        using (var csDecrypt = new CryptoStream(msDecrypt, decryptor, CryptoStreamMode.Read))
                        {
                            using (var srDecrypt = new StreamReader(csDecrypt))
                            {
                                result = srDecrypt.ReadToEnd();
                            }
                        }
                    }

                    return result;
                }
            }

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