110

How can I view symbols in a .o file? nm does not work for me. I use g++/linux.

8
  • 5
    nm is exactly what you'd use. Can you explain how it doesn't work for you ?
    – nos
    Commented Oct 7, 2010 at 10:57
  • 1
    It says : nm: Lib1.o: File format not recognized
    – nakiya
    Commented Oct 7, 2010 at 10:59
  • 4
    @nakiya: Run file Lib1.o and tell us what the output is.
    – DarkDust
    Commented Oct 7, 2010 at 11:03
  • 4
    @nakiya You can't run an .o file. And if you compile a header file you produce precompiled headers with recent gcc versions, not object files. You should compile .cpp files not header files.
    – nos
    Commented Oct 7, 2010 at 11:09
  • 2
    @nakiya: You cannot run it, you should really type the text "file Lib1.o" in your shell. The tool called file tells you the file type of Lib1.o, that is whether it really is an object file. I doubt it.
    – DarkDust
    Commented Oct 7, 2010 at 11:10

5 Answers 5

129

Instead of nm, you can use the powerful objdump. See the man page for details. Try objdump -t myfile or objdump -T myfile. With the -C flag you can also demangle C++ names, like nm does.

2
  • 2
    I tried ObjDump also. Same result : objdump: Lib1.o: File format not recognized
    – nakiya
    Commented Oct 7, 2010 at 11:07
  • 4
    try objdump -t Lib1.o
    – mustafa
    Commented Apr 23, 2014 at 8:50
17

Have you been using a cross-compiler for another platform? If so, you need to use the respective nm or objdump commmand.

For example, if you have used XXX-YYY-gcc to compile the .o file, you need to use XXX-YYY-nm or XXX-YYY-objdump to process the files.

10

Just run: nm you_obj_file.o | c++filt

5

You can use nm -C .o/lib/exe, for example:

xiongyu@ubuntu:~/tmp/build$ nm -C libfile1.a 

file1.cpp.o:
0000000000000000 T f()
0000000000000000 W int fun<int>(int)

using nm -C it will be more readable, if you just use nm:

xiongyu@ubuntu:~/tmp/build$ nm libfile1.a 

file1.cpp.o:
0000000000000000 T _Z1fv
0000000000000000 W _Z3funIiET_S0_

as we see it's not so readable.

Below is what my file1.cpp like:

xiongyu@ubuntu:~/tmp/build$ vi ../file1.cpp 
#include "head.h"
void f()  {
     int i = fun<int>(42);
}
4

There is a command to take a look at which functions are included in an object file or library or executable:

nm
2
  • 8
    The OP stated directly that he cannot use nm. Commented Mar 13, 2016 at 21:31
  • 1
    @ivan_pozdeev While that's true, I imagine some people (me at least) come to this question from just searching how to view symbols in object files, and in my case nm worked perfectly for my needs, so I think this is a fine answer given the circumstances.
    – Newbyte
    Commented Jan 26, 2022 at 15:45

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.