36

I want to write the equivalent in react:

if (this.props.conditionA) {
    <span>Condition A</span>
} else if (this.props.conditionB) {
    <span>Condition B</span>
} else {
    <span>Neither</span>
}

So maybe

render() {
    return (<div>
        {(function(){
            if (this.props.conditionA) {
                return <span>Condition A</span>
            } else if (this.props.conditionB) {
                return <span>Condition B</span>
            } else {
                return <span>Neither</span>
            }
        }).call(this)}
    </div>)
}

But that seems overly complex. Is there a better way?

2
  • Do you really want a wrapper div around the span? Commented Aug 7, 2016 at 4:23
  • @FelixKling this is meant to be representative of something more complex, but no the div is not exactly essential
    – Henry
    Commented Aug 7, 2016 at 4:26

7 Answers 7

121

Why do you say that the ternary is not expressive enough?

render() {
  return <span>
    {this.props.conditionA ? "Condition A" 
      : this.props.conditionB ? "Condition B" 
      : "Neither"}
  </span>;
}
8
  • 2
    Yeah good point, this is actually pretty tidy. I've used the ternary expression (in jsx) but started to find it cumbersome, maybe I need a better example before I can explain why.
    – Henry
    Commented Aug 7, 2016 at 5:25
  • 6
    This is a bad practice, nesting ternary operators can quickly become unreadable: eslint.org/docs/rules/no-nested-ternary Commented Jun 18, 2018 at 8:59
  • @SherloxFR That is debatable github.com/eslint/eslint/issues/3480#issuecomment-189960121 Commented Jun 18, 2018 at 10:48
  • @YosefWeiner I think it's actually better to make two {} blocks with ternary (or just &&), even if some people are not able to find a way around it, it is possible and from far more readable, the readability of a code isn't something debatable, even if I understand some people can struggle finding solutions to this eslint rule. Commented Jun 19, 2018 at 10:26
  • 1
    Thanks @Yosef Weiner, saved me hours of headaches :D Beautiful code with ternary ;)
    – heyooo12
    Commented Nov 16, 2021 at 17:32
16

If you don't need the <div>, just return the <span> elements:

render() {
  if (this.props.conditionA) {
    return <span>Condition A</span>;
  } else if (this.props.conditionB) {
    return <span>Condition B</span>;
  } else {
    return <span>Neither</span>;
  }
}

You can even move the last return statement out of the else block.


In general, you don't have to embed everything inside JSX. It's perfectly fine to compute values beforehand, just like you do elsewhere:

render() {
  let content;
  if (this.props.conditionA) {
    content = <span>Condition A</span>;
  } else if (this.props.conditionB) {
    content = <span>Condition B</span>;
  } else {
    content = <span>Neither</span>;
  }

  return <div>{content}</div>;
}

You have to do that whenever you need / want to use a statement.

1
  • 1
    I like the let content approach, && and ternary expression is just a tad hard to read
    – Chris Chen
    Commented Oct 7, 2017 at 10:07
13

Calculating the value, binding to a variable, then outputting later is better. If you do want complex logic inline, you could use && and ||:

render() {
    return (<div>
        {
          this.props.conditionA && <span>Condition A</span>
          || this.props.conditionB && <span>Condition B</span>
          || <span>Neither</span>
        }
    </div>)
}

Edit:

As others pointed out, you can also remove that wrapping div and still use this approach:

render() {
  return (
    this.props.conditionA && <span>Condition A</span>
    || this.props.conditionB && <span>Condition B</span>
    || <span>Neither</span>
  );
}
1
  • I like this - for some components, it's nice to have it all 'in front of you', as opposed to referring to other variables and/or components. I hear what you're saying though, be careful with the cognitive overhead.
    – Henry
    Commented Aug 7, 2016 at 4:28
1

If your condition is as simple as what you expressed, I think you can still use ternary as @SkinnyJ mentioned above. It's quite elegant, but I get your concern if there are lot of these conditions to check. There's one other way to solve this problem: using switch statement.

const props = {
  conditionA: "this is condition a"
};

let value;

switch (Object.keys(props)[0]) {
  case "conditionA":
    value = "Condition A";
    break;
  case "conditionB":
    value = "Condition B";
    break;
  default:
    value = "Neither";
}

console.log(value);

There are a couple of assumptions being made here. That the object is not null and that it has only one property.

But if those are true, for scenarios like this, switch might be more performant. This might be of interest for you:

Javascript switch vs if else

1

If any one still facing this issue, please paste below line in your eslintrc.js file.

"no-nested-ternary" : "off" 

This will allow you to start using nested ternary in your jsx code.

0

Indeed, that is not the way.

var element;
if (this.props.conditionA) {
    element = (<span>Condition A</span>)
} else if (this.props.conditionB) {
    element = (<span>Condition B</span>)
} else {
    element = (<span>Neither</span>)
} 
...
    {element}
0

I haven't seen the answer the React team recommends and that's using the double ampersand.

Example.

render() {
  return (<div>
      { (!conditionA && !conditionB) && <span>Neither</span>}
      { conditionA && <span>Condition A</span>}
      { conditionB && <span>Condition B</span>}
  </div>)
}
0

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