3

I'm writing some code and I have that feeling of urgh that I get when it feels ugly and inelegant but I can't see an immediate way to avoid it.

I have a json object that I'm getting from a third party. I know what to expect but I can't be sure that each element will definitely be there so I need to check that it exists like this:

if (object.has(ELEMENT)) {
  JsonObject element = object.get(ELEMENT);
}

The problem is that I sometimes have to go pretty deep into the object and it begins to feel ugly when I get so many nested ifs. Here is an example:

private boolean lineExists(JsonArray orders, Line lineItem) {
    final String LINE_ITEMS = "lineItems";
    final String ELEMENTS = "elements";
    final String NOTE = "note";
    boolean exists = false;

    log.debug("Checking if line item already exists in order...");

    // if there is no order payload then the order hasn't already been posted so there can't be a duplicate line item
    if (orders != null) {
        for (int i = 0; i < orders.size(); i++) {
            JsonObject order = orders.get(i).getAsJsonObject();
            if (order.has(LINE_ITEMS)) {
                JsonObject lineItems = order.get(LINE_ITEMS).getAsJsonObject();
                if (lineItems.has(ELEMENTS)) {
                    JsonArray elements = lineItems.get(ELEMENTS).getAsJsonArray();
                    for (int j = 0; j < elements.size(); j++) {
                        JsonObject existingLine = elements.get(j).getAsJsonObject();
                        if (existingLine.has(NOTE)) {
                            String note = existingLine.get(NOTE).getAsString();
                            // the note may change after this comparison so just check if the ID is contained in the
                            // note
                            if (note.contains(lineItem.getNote())) {
                                exists = true;

                                log.warn("Line item with note containing '{}' already exists in order.",
                                        lineItem.getNote());
                            }
                        }
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    return exists;
}

I know I can split some of the tests out into their own method like this:

private boolean lineExistCheck(JsonObject order) {
    final String LINE_ITEMS = "lineItems";
    final String ELEMENTS = "elements";

    return order.has(LINE_ITEMS) && order.get(LINE_ITEMS).getAsJsonObject().has(ELEMENTS);
}

I'm just wondering if there is a design pattern or a way of thinking that would help me write better code in this circumstance.

  • Thanks for the late but always welcome accept! – GhostCat Nov 25 '16 at 10:28
  • @GhostCat Totally thought I'd already done that! Sorry about the delay (oops). – SBmore Nov 25 '16 at 10:42
  • No need to feel sorry. When you are longer around, such unexpected things are really something you enjoy; it kinda feels like "free lunch" (you see, the "effort" took place quite some weeks ago; and now there is some surprising gain out of that ;-) – GhostCat Nov 25 '16 at 11:39
3

You want to read about the single layer of abstraction principle.

In essence, the idea would be that each thing that requires you to indent to the right ... should better go into its own method. So, you do not only put your tests into separate methods; you go even further.

And side note: using final like that ... doesn't buy you anything. In my eyes (but that is an opinion on style!) this is just waste that makes your CPU burn cycles for no good reason. Going one step further; it might make more sense to turn those local constants into global static ones.

The other thing (which is of course tricky, given the fact that you are working on a JsonObject) ... this code is a "nice" counter example to Tell Dont Ask. The point is: your code is querying the internal status of other objects; to make decisions based on that. In essence, that is procedural programming. In real OO, you don't ask an object for some information to then do something; nope; you simply tell that object to do whatever is needed. But as said; this doesn't really help here; given the fact that you are dealing with a generic JsonObject; and not a "real" object that has a known and well-defined interface you could be using to "tell" it what to do.

  • Thank you for the documentation and the code review. – Stéphane Eintrazi Aug 8 '16 at 11:48
  • Thank you @GhosttCat for the suggestions. I'm looking into the SLA principle now and hope to implement it in my projects. I also didn't know I was using final keyword incorrectly so I'll be doing some reading on the proper time to use that as well. – SBmore Aug 11 '16 at 7:56
  • You are very welcome! – GhostCat Aug 11 '16 at 9:15
1

What about creating a wrapper over JsonObject that would have methods for getLineItems / getElements all of which would return an empty array in case there are no line items or elements. In this case, you can write your code without checking whether specific properties exist.

In C# one would use a library that implements the conversion between JsonObject and your domain class, see this small example to get an idea. I am pretty sure a similar functionality exists in some library for Java.

1

Java 8 streaming API can help with straightening those nested loops. Without knowing which JSON library did you use and not wanting to find out I translated your structure into nested Lists and Maps:

JsonArray {
  JsonObject {
    String => JsonObject {    // LINE_ITEMS
      String => JsonArray {   // ELEMENTS
        JsonArray {
          JsonObject {
            String => String  // NOTE
          }
        }
      }
    } 
  }

is equivalent to

List<
  Map<String,                // LINE_ITEMS
    Map<String,              // ELEMENTS
      List<
        Map<
          String, String     // NOTE
         >
       >
     >
  >
>

I didn't refactor the code further (like making the strings constants into final static variables, which is highly advisable) only concentrated on this very issue: removing the nested loops:

private static boolean lineExists(Optional<List<Map<String, Map<String, List<Map<String, String>>>>>> ordersOrNull, Line lineItem) {
  final String LINE_ITEMS = "lineItems";
  final String ELEMENTS = "elements";
  final String NOTE = "note";
  MutableBoolean exists = new MutableBoolean(false);

  // if there is no order payload then the order hasn't already been posted so there can't be a duplicate line item
  ordersOrNull.ifPresent(orders -> {
    orders.stream().filter(order -> order.containsKey(LINE_ITEMS))
      .map(order -> order.get(LINE_ITEMS))
      .filter(lineItems -> lineItems.containsKey(ELEMENTS))
      .flatMap(lineItems -> lineItems.get(ELEMENTS).stream())
      .filter(element -> element.containsKey(NOTE) && element.get(NOTE).contains(lineItem.getNote()))
      .map(existingLine  -> existingLine.get(NOTE))
      .findAny()
      .ifPresent(n -> {
        System.out.println(String.format("Line item with note containing %s already exists in order.", lineItem.getNote()));
        exists.set();
    });
  });
  return exists.get();
}

I used an Optional to remove the null check and make it clear that a null can happen, I used a MutableBoolean to set the result value, since local variables used inside lambdas must be effectively final.

If you ask there is a MutableBoolean in apache commons-lang, but it doesn't really matter in the context of the question - it is just an implementation detail. The sole purpose of this snippet is to demonstrate how streaming API completely removes the need for nested loops and conditional statements.

For the sake of completness here is my sample implementation:

public static class MutableBoolean {
  boolean value;
  public MutableBoolean(boolean initialValue) {
    this.value = initialValue;
  }
  public void set() {
    value = true;
  }
  public void reset() {
    value = false;
  }
  public boolean get() {
    return value;
  }
}

And a very basic programm to test the code above:

interface Line {
  String getNote();
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
  Line line1 = new Line() {
    public String getNote() {
      return "nothing";
    }
  };
  Line line2 = new Line() {
    public String getNote() {
      return "something";
    }
  };

  Map<String, String> existingLine  = new HashMap<>();
  existingLine.put("note", "something");
  List<Map<String, String>> elements = new ArrayList<>();
  elements.add(existingLine);
  Map<String, List<Map<String, String>>> lineItems = new HashMap<>();
  lineItems.put("elements", elements);
  Map<String, Map<String, List<Map<String, String>>>> order = new HashMap<>();
  order.put("lineItems", lineItems);
  List<Map<String, Map<String, List<Map<String, String>>>>> orders = new ArrayList<>();
  orders.add(order);

  System.out.println(lineExists(Optional.of(orders), line1));
  System.out.println(lineExists(Optional.of(orders), line2));
}
  • Hi @Tomasz, thank you for this thorough reply, it's really interesting and helpful. I'm currently developing for the Google App Engine so unfortunately can't use Lambda expressions in my code, but it's something I'm interested in learning going forward so I'll be revisiting this post in the future. Thanks again. – SBmore Aug 11 '16 at 7:46
0

Definitely investigate https://github.com/daveclayton/json-schema-validator

Write a schema for your json objects and validate them against the schema. You don't want to be writing validation code for every different json object in every application you produce.

Here is a simple example of validating a message String against a schema String (once you've created a schema of course).

public void validate(String schema, String msg) {
        JsonNode schemaNode = JsonLoader.fromString(schema);
        JsonNode msgNode = JsonLoader.fromString(msg);

        JsonSchemaFactory factory = JsonSchemaFactory.byDefault();
        JsonSchema jsonSchema = factory.getJsonSchema(schemaNode);

        ProcessingReport report = jsonSchema.validate(msgNode);
        if (!report.isSuccess()) {
            throw new RuntimeException(report.toString());
        }
}

There's more you can do with the report, but this gives you an idea of how trivial it should be to validate any json message against any schema, just as you would do with xml.

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.