5

I have a C# WebApi project and i am using FluentValidation.WebApi package for validation of client inputs.

Below is my model class code which has C# property named "IsPremium". This same property has json name "isLuxury" for all the clients.

[Serializable, JsonObject, Validator(typeof(ProductValidator))]
public class Product
{
    [JsonProperty("isLuxury")]
    public bool? IsPremium { get; set; }
}

And my validator class looks like:

public class ProductValidator : AbstractValidator<Product>
    {
        public ProductValidator()
        {
            RuleFor(product => product.isPremium).NotNull();
        }
    }

So for a request like: http://localhost:52664/api/product

Request body:{ "isLuxury": "" }

I get following error:

{
  "Message": "The request is invalid.",
  "ModelState": {
    "product.isPremium": [
      "'is Premium' must not be empty."
    ]
  }
}

Fluent here is picking C# property name which makes no sense to the client as it knows it as "isLuxury". How can i force fluent to pick names from json property and not from c# property to give better validations like "'isLuxury' must not be empty."?

If not possible, i will have to rename all my C# properties to have same name as these json exposed to all the clients. Please suggest if you have any other better way to solve this problem.

11
  • 1
    You could I think do that by Overriding the Default Property Name to use the Json property name. – stuartd Aug 8 '16 at 13:12
  • even this solves problem partially, since i get "product.isPremium": ["'isLuxury' must not be empty."] - now product.isPremium makes no sense to the end user of api. can i change that too? – Sahil Sharma Aug 8 '16 at 13:18
  • got it, i had to use- OverridePropertyName. thanks for your help. – Sahil Sharma Aug 8 '16 at 13:24
  • -1, I mentioned way to solve your problem my answer to one of your previous questions. Please, read documentation before you ask new question. – Evgeny Levin Aug 8 '16 at 13:54
  • yeah my bad.. didn't read your previous answer properly. will make sure to read the documentation first. thanks for the direction. – Sahil Sharma Aug 8 '16 at 14:36
9

Modify the validator class with the OverridePropertyName method

public class ProductValidator : AbstractValidator<Product>
    {
        public ProductValidator()
        {
            RuleFor(product => product.isPremium).NotNull().OverridePropertyName("isLuxury");
        }
    }

Referring: https://github.com/JeremySkinner/FluentValidation/wiki/d.-Configuring-a-Validator#overriding-the-default-property-name

Alternatively you can call the WithName method which does a similar thing. If you want to completely rename the property, I'd use the OverridePropertyName method.

3
  • Calling WithName sufficient, if you call OverridePropertyName for same property – Evgeny Levin Aug 8 '16 at 14:13
  • Rather reverse is true. Calling OverridePropertyName sufficient if we want to call WithName for the same property. – Sahil Sharma Aug 8 '16 at 14:30
  • Anyway, there is no need to call both methods, in any situation. – Evgeny Levin Aug 8 '16 at 14:35

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