10

I have a C# WebApi project and i am using FluentValidation.WebApi package for validation of client inputs.

Below is my model class code which has C# property named "IsPremium". This same property has json name "isLuxury" for all the clients.

[Serializable, JsonObject, Validator(typeof(ProductValidator))]
public class Product
{
    [JsonProperty("isLuxury")]
    public bool? IsPremium { get; set; }
}

And my validator class looks like:

public class ProductValidator : AbstractValidator<Product>
    {
        public ProductValidator()
        {
            RuleFor(product => product.isPremium).NotNull();
        }
    }

So for a request like: http://localhost:52664/api/product

Request body:{ "isLuxury": "" }

I get following error:

{
  "Message": "The request is invalid.",
  "ModelState": {
    "product.isPremium": [
      "'is Premium' must not be empty."
    ]
  }
}

Fluent here is picking C# property name which makes no sense to the client as it knows it as "isLuxury". How can i force fluent to pick names from json property and not from c# property to give better validations like "'isLuxury' must not be empty."?

If not possible, i will have to rename all my C# properties to have same name as these json exposed to all the clients. Please suggest if you have any other better way to solve this problem.

11
  • 1
    You could I think do that by Overriding the Default Property Name to use the Json property name.
    – stuartd
    Commented Aug 8, 2016 at 13:12
  • even this solves problem partially, since i get "product.isPremium": ["'isLuxury' must not be empty."] - now product.isPremium makes no sense to the end user of api. can i change that too? Commented Aug 8, 2016 at 13:18
  • got it, i had to use- OverridePropertyName. thanks for your help. Commented Aug 8, 2016 at 13:24
  • -1, I mentioned way to solve your problem my answer to one of your previous questions. Please, read documentation before you ask new question. Commented Aug 8, 2016 at 13:54
  • yeah my bad.. didn't read your previous answer properly. will make sure to read the documentation first. thanks for the direction. Commented Aug 8, 2016 at 14:36

4 Answers 4

16

Modify the validator class with the OverridePropertyName method

public class ProductValidator : AbstractValidator<Product>
    {
        public ProductValidator()
        {
            RuleFor(product => product.isPremium).NotNull().OverridePropertyName("isLuxury");
        }
    }

Referring: https://github.com/JeremySkinner/FluentValidation/wiki/d.-Configuring-a-Validator#overriding-the-default-property-name

Alternatively you can call the WithName method which does a similar thing. If you want to completely rename the property, I'd use the OverridePropertyName method.

3
  • Calling WithName sufficient, if you call OverridePropertyName for same property Commented Aug 8, 2016 at 14:13
  • Rather reverse is true. Calling OverridePropertyName sufficient if we want to call WithName for the same property. Commented Aug 8, 2016 at 14:30
  • Anyway, there is no need to call both methods, in any situation. Commented Aug 8, 2016 at 14:35
1

As Sahil said, use the OverridePropertyName method. If you also use it in conjunction with this, it automatically figures out the JSON property name:

private string GetJsonPropertyName<T>(string propertyName)
{
    string jsonPropertyName =
        typeof(T).GetProperties()
        .Where(p => p.Name == propertyName)
        .Select(p => p.GetCustomAttribute<JsonPropertyAttribute>())
        .Select(jp => jp.PropertyName)
        .FirstOrDefault();

    if (null == jsonPropertyName)
    {
        throw new ArgumentException($"Type {nameof(T)} does not contain a property named {propertyName}");
    }

    return jsonPropertyName;
}

Which is then used like this:

RuleFor(product => product.IsPremium)
    .NotNull()
    .OverridePropertyName(
        GetJsonPropertyName<Product>(nameof(Product.IsPremium))
    );
0

If your validator validate JSON object (DTO), you can create an abstract implementation of AbstractValidator<T> which contains the JSON property path instead of the C# property path.

public abstract class JsonAbstractValidator<T> : AbstractValidator<T>
{
    protected JsonAbstractValidator()
    {
    }

    protected override void OnRuleAdded(IValidationRule<T> rule)
    {
        var jsonPropertyPath = GetJsonPropertyPath(rule.Expression);

        rule.PropertyName = jsonPropertyPath;
        SetDisplayName(rule, jsonPropertyPath);

        base.OnRuleAdded(rule);
    }

    private static void SetDisplayName(IValidationRule<T> rule, string name)
    {
        // The SetDisplayName() method is not available in the IValidationRule<T>.
        // A feature request has been submitted on the GitHub of FluentValidation to avoid using reflection:
        // https://github.com/FluentValidation/FluentValidation/issues/2179
        var setDisplayNameMethod = rule.GetType().GetMethod("SetDisplayName", new[] { typeof(string) }) !;

        setDisplayNameMethod.Invoke(rule, new object[] { name });
    }

    private static string GetJsonPropertyPath(LambdaExpression expression)
    {
        var body = expression.Body;

        if (body is UnaryExpression unaryExpression)
        {
            body = unaryExpression.Operand;
        }

        if (body is not MemberExpression memberExpression)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("The argument is not expression to access to a property.", nameof(expression));
        }

        var path = new List<string>();

        while (true)
        {
            if (memberExpression.Member is not PropertyInfo property)
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("The argument is not expression to access to a property.", nameof(expression));
            }

            path.Add(GetJsonPropertyName(property));

            if (memberExpression.Expression is ParameterExpression)
            {
                break;
            }

            var nextMemberExpression = memberExpression.Expression as MemberExpression;

            if (nextMemberExpression is null)
            {
                throw new ArgumentException("The argument is not expression to access to a property.", nameof(expression));
            }

            memberExpression = nextMemberExpression;
        }

        path.Reverse();

        return string.Join('.', path);
    }

    private static string GetJsonPropertyName(PropertyInfo property)
    {
        var attribute = property.GetCustomAttribute<JsonPropertyNameAttribute>();

        if (attribute is not null)
        {
            return attribute.Name;
        }

        return property.Name;
    }
}

Next, you just have to update your validator to inherit from the JsonAbstractValidator<T> class:

public class ProductValidator : JsonAbstractValidator<Product>
{
    public ProductValidator()
    {
        RuleFor(product => product.IsPremium).NotNull();
    }
}

By inheriting with the JsonAbstractValidator<Product> you should have the following error message: "'isLuxury' must not be empty."

NOTE: My JsonAbstractValidator<T> class use [JsonPropertyName] attribute of the System.Text.Json feature. If you use the Newtonsoft.Json implementation, replace the GetJsonPropertyName() method with the following implementation:

private static string GetJsonPropertyName(PropertyInfo property)
{
    var attribute = property.GetCustomAttribute<JsonPropertyAttribute>();

    if (attribute is not null)
    {
        return attribute.PropertyName;
    }

    return property.Name;
}
0

You can use global resolvers for all models in your application as described here.

It is better to register them on application start (during DI initialization)

In this example, I use System.Text.Json as a default serializer. Feel free to replace JsonPropertyNameAttribute with JsonPropertyAttribute if you use Newtonsoft.Json as a serializer.

using System.Reflection;
using System.Text.Json;
using System.Text.Json.Serialization;
using FluentValidation;
using Microsoft.Extensions.DependencyInjection;

namespace MyApplication.Models;

public static class Registration
{
    public static void AddValidationSupport(this IServiceCollection services)
    {
        SetPropertyResolvers();

        services.AddValidatorsFromAssembly(typeof(Registration).Assembly);
    }

    private static void SetPropertyResolvers()
    {
        ValidatorOptions.Global.PropertyNameResolver = (_, member, _) =>
        {
            var jsonPropertyNameAttribute = member?
                .GetCustomAttributes<JsonPropertyNameAttribute>()
                .FirstOrDefault();

            if (jsonPropertyNameAttribute != null)
            {
                return jsonPropertyNameAttribute.Name; // Render custom JSON property name
            }

            return member != null
                ? JsonNamingPolicy.CamelCase.ConvertName(member.Name) // To camel case
                : null; // Render default display name
        };

        // Use the same value for Display Name. Can be overridden by calling an `WithName` extension.
        ValidatorOptions.Global.DisplayNameResolver = ValidatorOptions.Global.PropertyNameResolver;
    }
}

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