14

I came across this exercise of checking whether or not the simple brackets "(", ")" in a given string are matched evenly.

I have seen examples here using the stack command which I haven't encountered yet. So I attempted a different approach. Can anyone tell me where I am going wrong?

def matched(str):
    ope = []
    clo = []
    for i in range(0,len(str)):
        l = str[i]
        if l == "(":
            ope = ope + ["("]
        else:
            if l == ")":
                clo = clo  + [")"]
            else:
                return(ope, clo)
    if len(ope)==len(clo):
        return True
    else:
        return False

The idea is to pile up "(" and ")" into two separate lists and then compare the length of the lists. I also had another version where I had appended the lists ope and clo with the relevant I which held either ( or ) respectively.

8
  • What problem are you having with your code. It's not the most elegant solution, but there doesn't seem to be much wrong with it... You might want to fix the indent on the def though. Aug 8, 2016 at 16:10
  • Well, I aint getting a sensible output. Here is a sample. matched("((jkl)78(A)&l(8(dd(FJI:),):)?)") = (['(', '('], [])
    – Vishesh
    Aug 8, 2016 at 16:11
  • 1
    The specific problem you are having is from the fact that you have that return call immediately as soon as a non () character is found, and you have it return the two lists of ( and ) Aug 8, 2016 at 16:22
  • 3
    If you want to solve the problem correctly you also have to address the case of a string like "( ( ) ) ) (", which contains an equal number of ( and ), but isn't matched correctly. Aug 8, 2016 at 16:31
  • 2
    Basically, in order to check whether they are properly matched you will need to keep track of the current nesting level, i.e. inside how many open parentheses you are at this very moment. One of the easiest ways to do that is by keeping track or open parentheses on a stack, as per my answer below.
    – kreld
    Aug 8, 2016 at 16:39

30 Answers 30

18

A very slightly more elegant way to do this is below. It cleans up the for loop and replaces the lists with a simple counter variable. It also returns false if the counter drops below zero so that matched(")(") will return False.

def matched(str):
    count = 0
    for i in str:
        if i == "(":
            count += 1
        elif i == ")":
            count -= 1
        if count < 0:
            return False
    return count == 0
5
  • 13
    This does not check whether the parentheses actually match, only whether the number of opening and closing parentheses is the same. Also, return count == 0 is more concise and more legible than the last four lines
    – kreld
    Aug 8, 2016 at 16:34
  • Sorry that is true, but it does check if the parens actually match through the if count<0: statement. Aug 8, 2016 at 16:36
  • Well, kreld's answer seems to be the most efficient, but your answer and Lukasz's was mostly what I was looking for, so will accept it.
    – Vishesh
    Aug 8, 2016 at 16:39
  • 1
    when you have "( ) ) (", your code return 1, but it expects 2.
    – NinjaG
    Mar 29, 2018 at 5:15
  • You need to check if "count" gets value less than 0. In this case, is not balanced Mar 24 at 12:18
14

This checks whether parentheses are properly matched, not just whether there is an equal number of opening and closing parentheses. We use a list as a stack and push onto it when we encounter opening parentheses and pop from it when we encounter closing parentheses.

The main problem with your solution is that it only counts the number of parentheses but does not match them. One way of keeping track of the current depth of nesting is by pushing opening parentheses onto a stack and popping them from the stack when we encounter a closing parenthesis.

def do_parentheses_match(input_string):
    s = []
    balanced = True
    index = 0
    while index < len(input_string) and balanced:
        token = input_string[index]
        if token == "(":
            s.append(token)
        elif token == ")":
            if len(s) == 0:
                balanced = False
            else:
                s.pop()

        index += 1

    return balanced and len(s) == 0
3
  • Thanks. I am looking at all the different answers here, though my original question was to find out the error in my own.
    – Vishesh
    Aug 8, 2016 at 16:31
  • I have no clear idea about the stack functionality, so was trying to avoid it.
    – Vishesh
    Aug 8, 2016 at 16:33
  • This example is just an implementation of the stack, so if it isn't hard to understand, you could probably pick that up easily. Aug 8, 2016 at 16:35
11

My solution here works for brackets, parentheses & braces

openList = ["[", "{", "("]
closeList = ["]", "}", ")"]


def balance(myStr):
    stack = []
    for i in myStr:
        if i in openList:
            stack.append(i)
        elif i in closeList:
            pos = closeList.index(i)
            if (len(stack) > 0) and (openList[pos] == stack[len(stack) - 1]):
                stack.pop()
            else:
                return "Unbalanced"
    if len(stack) == 0:
        return "Balanced"


print(balance("{[()](){}}"))
1
  • +Nice effort. if ((len(stack) > 0) and (openList[pos] == stack[len(stack)-1])): can be shortened to if len(stack) > 0 and openList[pos] == stack[-1]:. len(stack) == 0 to not stack. A dict can also be used instead of 2 lists. Sep 24, 2021 at 21:07
6

Most blatant error done by you is:

    if l == ")":
        clo = clo  + [")"]
    else:
        return(ope, clo)  # here

By using return, you exit from function when first char not equal to "(" or ")" is encountered. Also some indentation is off.

Minimal change which allows your code to run (although it won't give correct answers for all possible input strings) is:

def matched(str):
    ope = []
    clo = []
    for i in range(0,len(str)):
        l = str[i]
        if l == "(":
            ope = ope + ["("]
        elif l == ")":
            clo = clo  + [")"]
    if len(ope)==len(clo):
        return True
    else:
        return False
1
  • Thanks. Most people have given their versions, but I was interested in knowing where I messed up.
    – Vishesh
    Aug 8, 2016 at 16:31
4

The problem with your approach is that you don't consider the order. Following line would pass: ))) (((. I'd suggest to keep the count of open and closed parenthesis:

  • counter starts from 0
  • every ( symbol increments counter
  • every ) symbol decrements counter
  • if at any moment counter is negative it is an error
  • if at the end of the line counter is 0 - string has matching parenthesis
1
  • I already posted this, and it also does not address the actual problem they were encountering in their code, which was the early return statement. Aug 8, 2016 at 16:23
3
a = "((a+b)*c)+(b*a))"

li = list(a)
result = []

for i in range(0, len(a)):

    if a[i] == "(":
        result.append(i)
    elif a[i] == ")":
        if len(result) > 0:
            result.pop()
        else:
            li.pop(i)

for i in range(0, len(result)):
    li.pop(result[i])

print("".join(li))
1
  • Nice. This works only for one not missing or one extra.
    – ASHu2
    Jun 27, 2019 at 5:55
3

this code works fine

def matched(s):
  p_list=[]
  for i in range(0,len(s)):
    if s[i] =='(':
      p_list.append('(')
    elif s[i] ==')' :
      if not p_list:
        return False
      else:
        p_list.pop()
  if not p_list:
    return True
  else:
    return False
5
  • Won't this raise an error for trying to access p_list[-1] if p_list is of length 0 instead of returning false. This needs to be wrapped in a try except to catch indexerror as false. Aug 8, 2016 at 16:33
  • if p_list is of length 0 , then the statement del p_list[-1] will not be executed . am i right? @Henry Prickett-Morgan Aug 8, 2016 at 16:41
  • Try it out in the python shell. If you do p_list=[] and then del p_list[-1] you get an IndexError Aug 8, 2016 at 16:49
  • yes that is true. but that condition is bypassed with the if statement 'if notp_list' Aug 9, 2016 at 2:01
  • Wow I need to get my brain checked or something you're right Aug 9, 2016 at 16:43
2

You can do this in a couple of lines using accumulate (from itertools). The idea is to compute a cumulative parenthesis level going through the string with opening parentheses counting as level+1 and closing parentheses counting as level-1. If, at any point, the accumulated level falls below zero then there is an extra closing parenthesis. If the final level is not zero, then there is a missing closing parenthesis:

from itertools import accumulate
def matched(s):
    levels = list(accumulate((c=="(")-(c==")") for c in s))
    return all( level >= 0 for level in levels) and levels[-1] == 0
2
  • I really like your solution! But is the last check (levels[-1]) needed? If yes, can you give me an example? Mar 24 at 12:25
  • 1
    It is needed to ensure that all opening parentheses are closed: e.g. (()
    – Alain T.
    Mar 24 at 14:05
1

if the parenthesis sequence is not an issue (strings like )( ) this code is faster :

def matched_parenthesis(s):
    return s.count('(') == s.count(')')

Tested with 15KB string, it is ~20μs v.s. 1ms iterating over the whole string.

And for me the order is not an issue as the underlying protocol guaranties that the string is well-formed.

1

In case u also need to find the position of the first mismatching bracket from left u can use the below code which also cover certain edge cases:

def isBalanced(expr):
    opening=set('([{')
    new=set(')]}{[(')
    match=set([ ('(',')'), ('[',']'), ('{','}') ])
    stack=[]
    stackcount=[]
    for i,char in enumerate(expr,1):
        if char not in new:
            continue
        elif char in opening:
            stack.append(char)
            stackcount.append(i)
        else:
            if len(stack)==0:
                print(i)
                return False
            lastOpen=stack.pop()
            lastindex=stackcount.pop()
            if (lastOpen, char) not in match:
                print (i)
                return False
    length=len(stack)
    if length!=0:
      elem=stackcount[0]
      print (elem)
    return length==0
string =input()
ans=isBalanced(string)
if ans==True:
    print("Success")
1

if "(" ,")" these two characters are not present then we don't want to return true or false just return no matching found. if matching found i just checking the count of both characters are same then return true, else return false

def matched(str):
   count1=0
   count2=1
   for i in str:
       if i =="(":
           count1+=1:
       elif i==")":
           count2+=1:
       else:
           print "no matching found for (,)"
   if count1==count2:
        return True
   else:
        return False
2
  • Hello, can you please add some explanation on what you did (and why your solution should be better than the others) ?
    – NatNgs
    Jan 12, 2018 at 13:30
  • @NatNgs i have added brief explanation
    – Arjun P P
    Jan 12, 2018 at 13:45
1

Simplest of all , though all of you guys have done good:

def wellbracketed(s):
    left=[]
    right=[]
    for i in range(0,len(s)):``
        if s[i]=='(':
            left=left+['(']
        elif s[i]==')':
            if len(left)!=0:
                right=right+[')']
        else:
            return False

    return(len(left)==len(right))
1
  • IMO removing 0 from range because it's unecessary and iterating over the string itself instead of an index would be much more pythonic. Also, '_' in the name between words is considered good style (well_bracketed). Jul 7, 2018 at 17:08
1

here's another way to solve it by having a counter that tracks how many open parentheses that are difference at this very moment. this should take care all of the cases.

def matched(str):
    diffCounter = 0
    length = len(str)
    for i in range(length):
        if str[i] == '(':
            diffCounter += 1
        elif str[i] == ')':
            diffCounter -= 1
    if diffCounter == 0:
        return True
    else:
        return False
0
1

An alternative to check for balanced nested parentheses:

def is_balanced(query: str) -> bool:
    # Alternative: re.sub(r"[^()]", "", query)
    query = "".join(i for i in query if i in {"(", ")"})
    while "()" in query:
        query = query.replace("()", "")
    return not query


for stmt in [
    "(()()()())",    # True
    "(((())))",      # True
    "(()((())()))",  # True
    "((((((())",     # False
    "()))",          # False
    "(()()))(()",    # False
    "foo",           # True
    "a or (b and (c or d)",  # False
    "a or (b and (c or d))"  # True
    "a or (b and (c or (d and e)))",  # True
]:
    print(stmt)
    print("Balanced:", is_balanced(stmt))
    print()

It works by:

  1. Removing everything but parentheses
  2. Recursively remove innermost parentheses pairs
  3. If you're left with anything besides the empty string, the statement is not balanced. Otherwise, it is.
0
input_str = "{[()](){}}"
strblance=""

for i in input_str:

    if not strblance:
        strblance = strblance+i
    elif (i is '}' and strblance[len(strblance)-1] is '{') \
        or ( i is']'and strblance[len(strblance)-1] is '[') \
        or ( i is ')'and strblance[len(strblance)-1] is '('):
            strblance = strblance[:len(strblance)-1]
    else:
        strblance = strblance+i

if not strblance:

    print ("balanced")

else:

    print ("Not balanced")
1
  • 1
    You should add a few explanations how this solves the mentioned problem.
    – moggi
    Sep 19, 2017 at 11:22
0

More advanced example in which you additionally need to check a matching of square brackets '[]' and braces '{}' pars.

string = '([]{})'

def group_match(string):

    d = {
    ')':'(',
    ']':'[',
    '}':'{'
    }

    list_ = []

    for index, item in enumerate(string):
        if item in d.values():
            list_.append(item)

        elif (item in d.keys()) and (d.get(item) in list_):
            list_.pop()

    return len(list_) == 0
1
  • How this answer correlates to the question?
    – NinjaG
    Apr 24, 2018 at 16:12
0

The simplest code ever!!

def checkpar(x):
    while len(''.join([e for e in x if e in "()"]).split('()'))>1: x=''.join(x.split('()'))
    return not x
2
  • your piece of code is not working as you expect or you didn't read the question right : string.split('()') will split a string like "left () right" but not "(left (right))" Jul 26, 2017 at 11:20
  • Fixed it. I removed all characters that aren't parenthesis Feb 17, 2018 at 6:38
0

you can check this code.
This code don't use stack operations.

def matched(s):
  count = 0
  for i in s:
    if i is "(":
      count += 1
    elif i is ")":
      if count != 0:
        count -= 1
      else:
        return (False)

  if count == 0:
    return (True)
  else:
    return (False)
0
    #function to check if number of closing brackets is equal to the number of opening brackets
    #this function also checks if the closing bracket appears after the opening bracket
    def matched(str1):
        if str1.count(")")== str1.count("("):
            p1=str1.find("(")
            p2=str1.find(")")
            if p2 >= p1:
                str1=str1[p1+1:p2]+ str1[p2+1:]
                if str1.count(")")>0 and str1.count("(")>0:
                    matched(str1)
                return True
            else:
                return False
        else:
            return False

    matched(str1)
0
parenthesis_String = input("Enter your parenthesis string")
parenthesis_List = []
for p in parenthesis_String:
    parenthesis_List.append(p)
print(parenthesis_List)

if len(parenthesis_List)%2 != 0:
    print("Not Balanced Wrong number of input")

for p1 in parenthesis_List:
    last_parenthesis = parenthesis_List.pop()
    print(last_parenthesis)
    if (p1 == '{' and last_parenthesis == '}' or p1 == '[' and last_parenthesis == ']' or p1 == '(' and last_parenthesis == ')'):
        print("Balanced")
    else:
        print("Not balanced")
0
0

A little different one.

expression = '{(){({)}}'
brackets = '[](){}'
stack  = []
balanced = False
for e in expression:
    if e in brackets and stack: # Popping from the stack if it is closing bracket
        if stack [-1] == brackets[brackets.index(e)-1]:
            stack.pop()
            balanced = True
            continue # it will go to the new iteration skipping the next if below
    if e in brackets: # Push to stack if new bracket in the expression
        stack .append(e)
        balanced = False
balanced = 'Balanced' if balanced and not stack  else 'Unbalanced'
print(balanced, stack)
0

just modified Henry Prickett-Morgan's code a little bit to handle it more sensibly, namely taking into account that the number of "(" matches that of ")" but string starts with ")" or ends with "(" which are apparently not right.


def ValidParenthesis(s):
    count = 0
    if s[0] == ')' or s[-1] == '(':
      return False
    else:
      for c in s:
        if c == '(':
          count += 1
        elif c == ')':
          count -= 1
        else:
          continue
      return count == 0

0

The best way to understand this snippet is to follow along with all kind of scenarios.

in_data = ['{','[','(']
out_data = ['}',']',')']

def check_match(statements):
    stack = []
    for ch in statements:
        if ch in in_data:
            stack.append(ch)
        if ch in out_data:
            last = None
            if stack: 
                last = stack.pop()
            if last is '{' and ch is '}':
                continue
            elif last is '[' and ch is ']':
                continue
            elif last is '(' and ch is ')':
                continue
            else:
                return False
    if len(stack) > 0:
        return False
    else:
        return True

print(check_match("{www[eee}ee)eee"))
print(check_match("(ee)(eee[eeew]www)"))
print(check_match("(ss(ss[{ss}]zs)zss)"))
print(check_match("([{[[]]}])"))
0
def matched(str):
    braces = {"{": "}", "(": ")", "[": "]"}
    stack = []
    for c in str:
        if c in braces.keys():
            stack.append(c)
        elif c in braces.values():
            if not stack:
                return False
            last_brace = stack.pop()
            if braces[last_brace] != c:
                return False
    if stack:
        return False
    return True

print(matched("()"))
>> True
print(matched("(}"))
>> False
print(matched("}{"))
>> False
print(matched("}"))
>> False
print(matched("{"))
>> False
print(matched("(ff{fgg} [gg]h)"))
>> True
0

Given a string s containing just the characters '(', ')', '{', '}', '[' and ']', determine if the input string is valid.

def isValid(s):
    stack = []
    for i in s:
        if i in open_list:
            stack.append(i)
        elif i in close_list:
            pos = close_list.index(i)
            if open_list[pos] == stack[len(stack)-1]:
                stack.pop()
            else:
                return False
    if len(stack) == 0:
        return True
    else:
        return False

print(isValid("{[(){}]}"))
0
s='{[]{()}}}{'
t=list(s)
cntc=0
cnts=0
cntp=0
cntc=min(t.count("{"),t.count("}"))
cnts=min(t.count("["),t.count("]"))
cntp=min(t.count("("),t.count(")"))
print(cntc+cnts+cntp)
0

for a balanced string, we can find an opening brace followed by it closing brace. if you do this basic check you could remove the checked substring and check the remaining string. At the end, if the string is not empty then it is not balanced.

def is_balanced(s: str) -> bool:
    while any([x in s for x in ["", "", ""]]):
        s=s.replace("{}", "").replace("[]","").replace("()","")
    return s==""
-1
def parenthesis_check(parenthesis):
    chars = []
    matches = {')':'(',']':'[','}':'{'}
    for i in parenthesis:
        if i in matches:
            if chars.pop() != matches[i]:
                return False
        else:
            chars.append(i)
    return chars == []        
1
  • If you try to implement and Semaphores..... then your answer becomes unique answer! Now it is flagged for very low quality.
    – ZF007
    Mar 19, 2018 at 11:09
-1
foo1="()()())("  

def bracket(foo1):
    count = 0
    for i in foo1:
        if i == "(":
           count += 1
        else:
           if count==0 and i ==")":
               return False
           count -= 1

   if count == 0:
       return True
   else:
       return False

bracket(foo1)
1
  • 2
    How this answer correlates to the question?
    – sg7
    Mar 26, 2018 at 2:31
-1

Although I'm not proposing a fix to your implementation, I suggest a cleaner and more pythonic version of the @kreld solution:

def check_parentheses(expr):
    s = []
    for c in expr:
        if c in '(':
            s.append(c)
        elif c in ')':
            if not len(s):
                break
            else:
                s.pop()
    else:
        return not len(s)
    return False

# test -----------------------------------------------------------------
test_expr = [')(', '(()', '())', '(', ')', '((', '))', '(()())', '(())',
             '()', '()(())']
for i, t in enumerate(test_expr, 1):
    print '%i\t%s\t%s' % (i, t, check_parentheses(t))

# output ---------------------------------------------------------------
1       )(      False
2       (()     False
3       ())     False
4       (       False
5       )       False
6       ((      False
7       ))      False
8       (()())  True
9       (())    True
10      ()      True
11      ()(())  True

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