9

I'm currently trying to debug a piece of simple code and wish to see how a specific variable type changes during the program.

I'm using the typeinfo header file so I can utilise typeid.name(). I'm aware that typeid.name() is compiler specific thus the output might not be particularly helpful or standard.

I'm using GCC but I cannot find a list of the potential output despite searching, assuming a list of typeid output symbols exist. I don't want to do any sort of casting based on the output or manipulate any kind of data, just follow its type.

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

int main()
{ 
    int a = 10;
    cout << typeid(int).name() << endl;
}

Is there a symbol list anywhere?

  • it might be worth noting that it's GCC bundled with MinGW. – aLostMonkey Oct 7 '10 at 16:10
  • 1
    if you just want to follow types, then how about if (typeid(a) == typeid(int)) { /* action */ }? – Donotalo Oct 7 '10 at 16:10
  • What are you trying to do? What do you mean by symbol list exactly? – sellibitze Oct 7 '10 at 16:16
  • 2
    "... variable type changes...". Er... In C++ variable types never change. Variable always have the type it was first declared with. – AnT Oct 7 '10 at 16:19
  • possible duplicate of Unmangling the result of std::type_info::name – Mike Seymour Oct 7 '10 at 16:25
15

I don't know if such a list exists, but you can make a small program to print them out:

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

#define PRINT_NAME(x) std::cout << #x << " - " << typeid(x).name() << '\n'

int main()
{
    PRINT_NAME(char);
    PRINT_NAME(signed char);
    PRINT_NAME(unsigned char);
    PRINT_NAME(short);
    PRINT_NAME(unsigned short);
    PRINT_NAME(int);
    PRINT_NAME(unsigned int);
    PRINT_NAME(long);
    PRINT_NAME(unsigned long);
    PRINT_NAME(float);
    PRINT_NAME(double);
    PRINT_NAME(long double);
    PRINT_NAME(char*);
    PRINT_NAME(const char*);
    //...
}
  • many thanks, not too sure why this didn't cross my mind. This works perfectly. – aLostMonkey Oct 7 '10 at 16:26
  • 5
    template< typename T > void PRINT_NAME() { std::cout << … } – Potatoswatter Oct 7 '10 at 16:52
  • @Potatoswatter and how do you stringify T ? you're solution is less powerful than Bens's. – v.oddou Apr 18 '13 at 2:20
  • example on ideone – UniversE May 17 '13 at 7:42

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